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Fri Jun 22, 2012, 04:20 AM

Libraries target growing e-book audience

Most U.S. libraries lend e-books, but most people don't know about it: Only 22 percent realize the fast-growing digital format is available, according to a new survey. And even fewer people 12 percent of e-book readers have borrowed an e-book from the library in the past year, according to a poll released today by the Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project.
"I'm a little surprised," Patrick Wall, director of the University City Public Library, said Thursday when told about the survey.
"Libraries are all trying to educate patrons."
The St. Louis Public Library has hundreds of requests for e-books every month, said Barb Knotts, manager for electronic collections.
In just the past 18-24 months, she said, e-book lending has surpassed the demand for audiobooks. Library card holders don't even have to go to the library to check out an e-book. Most systems allow patrons to download e-books from the library's website.
"It takes time to build any audience," Knotts said. "Libraries are now using social media to alert people about new titles."
The Pew survey delves into the tangle of issues libraries face with the evolving e-book world.
Some of those might be higher than patron ignorance on a library's list of concerns:
E-books can cost libraries many times what a print book does.
Last year's big summer release, "A Dance With Dragons," by George R.R. Martin, was offered to the University City library at $19.95 for a hardcover, but a single e-book cost $85.


Read more: http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/metro/fb6bf996-b0ef-57ab-b5a8-910d76415b02.html#ixzz1yVZWSxVG

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Libraries target growing e-book audience (Original post)
Sherman A1 Jun 2012 OP
HiPointDem Jun 2012 #1
Le Taz Hot Jun 2012 #2
cali Jun 2012 #3
Le Taz Hot Jun 2012 #9
RegieRocker Jun 2012 #4
joshcryer Jun 2012 #5
ellenfl Jun 2012 #6
Sherman A1 Jun 2012 #7
yewberry Jun 2012 #8

Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 04:21 AM

1. our library has this. i've never tried it though.

 

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 04:42 AM

2. I've been doing this ever since

I got my (cheap, knock-off from Big Lots) E-reader. I still check out actual book books from the library but it's nice to have the option of either/both.

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Response to Le Taz Hot (Reply #2)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 05:05 AM

3. does your knock off work well? I'm in love with my kindle. Never thought I would be, but it's just

 

been great. Haven't used a library for it though. Must start.

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Response to cali (Reply #3)

Sat Jun 23, 2012, 05:56 AM

9. Wellllll, it depends

on the day, solstice, longitude and latitude . . . seriously, most times it works fine but other times it insists on freezing when I turn the page. But it was only $60.00 so I can't complain.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 06:06 AM

4. Great post! Thx for the info.

 

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 06:16 AM

5. The end of paper books is near.

And I love it.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 12:42 PM

6. e-books cost more? how will that translate to the library? eom

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Response to ellenfl (Reply #6)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 03:19 PM

7. I think it's the license the

library uses on the book that costs more as they are allowed to share the copies with their audience as opposed to an individual who simply buys one download book.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Fri Jun 22, 2012, 03:49 PM

8. I think it must be very popular where I am.

I'm a frequent borrower of ebooks. My local library has a pretty large selection, but it can be frustrating to find ebooks that are actually available. There are waiting lists for almost everything, and I don't even bother with new releases. At the same time, though, I've never left the library site without a few books.

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