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Mon Aug 26, 2019, 05:23 PM

Advice needed: Cooking time with different measurements

Last edited Tue Aug 27, 2019, 10:30 AM - Edit history (1)

I'm making Pernil (Cuban/Central American Port Roast) for the first time.

The recipe is for a 7 pound piece of meat. I bought the closest weight, which was 9 pounds.

First roasting time is 90 minutes. So, I get it: 90 minutes for a 7 lb roast. Tell me if I'm right about calculating how much time in the oven for a 9 lb roast.

Do I divide 7 into 90 to get how long per pound? (12.85 per pound or 13 minutes and that means 1 hour and 55 minutes).

Am I close to correct?

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Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Advice needed: Cooking time with different measurements (Original post)
no_hypocrisy Aug 2019 OP
comradebillyboy Aug 2019 #1
trof Aug 2019 #8
mitch96 Aug 2019 #13
James48 Aug 2019 #2
sir pball Aug 2019 #5
rsdsharp Aug 2019 #14
no_hypocrisy Aug 2019 #3
procon Aug 2019 #4
sir pball Aug 2019 #7
Kali Aug 2019 #6
japple Aug 2019 #9
no_hypocrisy Aug 2019 #10
japple Aug 2019 #11
no_hypocrisy Aug 2019 #12

Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 05:28 PM

1. Your assumption is reasonable but a meat thermometer

can eliminate the guesswork.

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Response to comradebillyboy (Reply #1)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 07:26 PM

8. Bingo! No need to guess.

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Response to comradebillyboy (Reply #1)

Tue Aug 27, 2019, 08:22 AM

13. +1 I love my thermoworks temp guage

I also have a remote one I stick in and the meter is outside the oven. When it reaches the target temp, I'm done... YMMV>
m

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 05:33 PM

2. Pork roast?

Pork should be cooked to an internal temp of 185’F. That usually means 20-25 minutes per pound on a pork roast at 350’F.

I do not know your dish, but I believe it needs to be fully cooked. Good luck.

While beef roasts (rare) can be cooked at 12-15 min per pound, pork takes longer (25 min) and requires higher internal temp to be safe.

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Response to James48 (Reply #2)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 06:20 PM

5. It hasn't been recommended in ages to cook your pork to leather

145° has been the FDA recommendation for ten years or so now, 185° is wicked excessive and why lots of people think pork is a nasty dry meat. Even chicken is only 165°.

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Response to sir pball (Reply #5)

Tue Aug 27, 2019, 11:29 AM

14. Generally true, although it depends on the cut, and how you're cooking it.

For example, a pork shoulder, braised or smoked, needs to get to about 190 for the collagen to break down and the meat to get tender. Ribs also need a higher finish temp.

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 05:53 PM

3. Here's where it goes whack:

450 degrees/90 minutes

Then 375 degrees/2-1/2 hours

Then roast until 190 degrees/about 1 hour

Then roast 15 to 30 minutes at 500 degrees

No final internal temperature given.

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 06:11 PM

4. Use a meat thermometer for accuracy.

All ovens are different and none of them are precise when it comes to temperatures and that changes cooking times. The cut of meat, the quality such as marbeling, membranes, bones, aged, and fat layer will also affect cooking times. The cooking method, roasted, stewed, boiled or braised all will change your cooking time.

Insert a meat thermometer into the thickest part of the meat, but not near any bone. Check the temperature according to your personal tastes for either rare, medium or well done.

When your meat is done let it rest for about 10-15 minutes. Cover the roast with a sheet of foil and lay a towel over it. This gives the meat fibers times to absorb all the juices which will make the meat more flavorful and rich with juices.

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Response to procon (Reply #4)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 06:32 PM

7. Second the thermometer. Checked a couple.of recipes and

it looks like you want to pull it at around 170°. Well-done and easily shreddable, but still moist and tender.

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 06:30 PM

6. Meh just add 15 Minutes or so to each stage.

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 08:04 PM

9. Am wondering what cut of meat this is? Is it a fresh ham? A shoulder cut?

It makes a difference.

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Response to japple (Reply #9)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 08:16 PM

10. Picnic shoulder cut with bone

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Response to no_hypocrisy (Reply #10)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 08:36 PM

11. It makes a big difference in how you cook it.

How to Cook: “It’s a really great thing to roast,” says Mylan. It’s a relatively tough cut, well layered with fat, and is good for braising, slow and low roasting or barbecue. “Shoulders are good for when you’re going to cook for a long period of time and want it to stay moist,” he says. A typical preparation? Pulled pork.

https://modernfarmer.com/2014/03/pork-cuts-101-diagram/

and save the bone to make into soup. If you can't use it soon, freeze it for later. Boil the bone in a small pan of water and make broth that you use to flavor soup, beans or other vegetables. You can freeze it in small containers or ice cube trays that can be transferred into freezer bags after the cubes are solid.

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Response to japple (Reply #11)

Mon Aug 26, 2019, 10:00 PM

12. Thank you! Maybe a future split pea soup bone.

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