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Thu May 30, 2013, 08:15 PM

HAPPY COWS

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply HAPPY COWS (Original post)
DainBramaged May 2013 OP
BainsBane May 2013 #1
Auntie Bush May 2013 #2
sinkingfeeling May 2013 #3
yellerpup May 2013 #4
IrishAyes Jun 2013 #6
yellerpup Jun 2013 #8
IrishAyes Jun 2013 #9
longship May 2013 #5
IrishAyes Jun 2013 #7

Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Thu May 30, 2013, 08:18 PM

1. Happy cows make tastier milk

and meat.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Thu May 30, 2013, 09:19 PM

2. Never saw such happy cows before.

I live in cow country and they seem to just stand there and munch on grass or lay around in the sun or shade...not much else.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri May 31, 2013, 08:05 AM

3. The way we always raised cattle. I miss the 'old' days.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri May 31, 2013, 10:34 AM

4. What beautiful, playful girls.

Now I miss the farm, and Cleo, my pet Holstein heifer. When I was a child I spent hours and hours with cows all summer long pretending that I was one of the herd. They taught me the rules of how to behave around 1) different species; 2) bigger heavier animals than myself. They tolerated my greetings to newborn calves, shared their salt lick... I miss that tribe.

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Response to yellerpup (Reply #4)

Sat Jun 1, 2013, 05:16 PM

6. I can relate to that

Summers on the farm, I'd take a book out to the pasture and read to the cows. Although the book had nothing to do with it, cows will come and form a protective, attentive circle around you if you sit quietly.

My favorite cow story, however, involved an old lady (not me!) who was going to be away from the farm awhile, so she hired a couple older boys to come take care of the milk cow twice a day. After offering them a good dollar, she set the hook with another tip: the milk cow didn't really like men so they'd have to wear a dress when doing the work. Otherwise the cow would fight them. Turned out to be true. I don't know that the story itself is true, but cows certainly have their own personalities and quirks.

No, maybe my favorite cow story is one I can vouch for because I'm the perpetrator. Wound up at an aunt and uncle's farm one summer, which was a big mistake because Uncle Azur was a real fire and brimstone preacher who believed in corporal punishment. But he didn't dare do anything himself because he knew what my dad would do to him. So he'd hand Aunt Star a belt and send her with me into the bedroom for my punishment. She'd yell at me, slam the door shut, and then whale away on the bed, making a great noise while I pretended to beg for mercy. By the time we came out, we both had tears streaming down our faces (from silent laughter) and the old coot would be satisfied that justice had been done.

I didn't consider justice done, however, until the Sunday I feigned illness and begged off going to church with them. Didn't want to hear another sermon about women's wicked ways. As I sat on the front porch, inspiration struck. The milk cow in the front pasture bordering the highway was NAKED! Determined to teach her the error of her ways, I took a pair of Uncle Azur's bib overalls off the clothesline, cut them to fit the job, and somehow managed to attach them to a very mellow old cow so that her bag wouldn't show.

She just kept munching along as if nothing in her world had changed at all. I stayed on the porch, rocking away and waiting for church to let out, knowing that most of the attendees would pass by in plain sight on their way home. They must've approved, because quite a few honked their horns in passing and waved at me. I waved back, happy as a clam. When Uncle Azur's truck appeared, though, I could hear him swearing at the top of his lungs so I ran and hid.

But I'll guarantee you one thing, they took me home that day and I was never forced to visit again, not even under parental supervision. I guess he banned me.

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Response to IrishAyes (Reply #6)

Sun Jun 2, 2013, 07:29 PM

8. What a wonderful story!

You were a very savvy and resourceful girl and your Aunt Star appreciated you. I recall the feeling of freedom when my Aunt Betty expelled me from her Bible class. She said, "If you are going to ask those kind of questions, you don't belong here." Amen. I am a fan of Temple Grandin, too. Her observations allowed me to connect to a kitty we rescued back in 1991, but didn't closely bond with for years until I understood that he was a little more autistic than my other pets. When I began to whisper instead of chat to him and became more mindful of quick movements and loud noises he began to open up. He even purred occasionally. He lived to be almost 17 years old and never sat on my lap. He loved me and we loved each other. Such a quiet, sweet soul.

I can imagine your Uncle Azur, apoplectic, at the sight of his milk cow strutting around in her more-naked-than-naked state. Savory story. You were a clever, clever girl.

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Response to yellerpup (Reply #8)

Sun Jun 2, 2013, 07:49 PM

9. Well, I followed Will Rogers' advice as given in your signature.

Congratulations to you as well on surviving your Aunt Betty. We all have people like that in our family tree; sometimes a whole tribe of them.

I think one early event was pivotal in innoculating me against fundamentalist interpretations of the Bible or much of anything else, for that matter. Somewhere in Joshua, he's supposedly instructed to kill all the horses because their use in war would undermine absolute faith in God's ability to win the day. That's a cockamamie notion in the first place, and I have no intention of blaming the Almighty for it. But worse, the book claims that God said to hamstring the horses - surely one of the cruelest ways to dispose of them. Not on my dumbest day was I about to swallow that, not even at 5 years old. So of course it got my radar up for other possible contradictions.

When I first moved here, I was so lonesome that I made the mistake of accepting an invitation to a home bible study. Didn't go too well. They were not fond of my offering 'alternate interpretations', because of course they worshipped their beliefs rather than God. Finally one evening a particular woman started an anti-Obama screed; I stood up, slapped my hands down hard on the table, and read her the riot act, starting off with "Cork it, sister!" I suppose that's one reason people call me difficult. I question and disagree with them and don't put up with much ragging on the President.

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Response to DainBramaged (Original post)

Fri May 31, 2013, 05:15 PM

5. Temple Grandin!

Temple Grandin is an autistic person whose life was documented in an HBO biopic starring Claire Danes. Her whole life has been devoted to the ethical treatment of animals, especially cattle.

Here's the Wiki for the film:
http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Temple_Grandin_(film)

When I rented the movie from my local movie rental, I was awed by the production values and Grandin's story, awesomely portrayed by Danes. Then, I watched the film again with the director's and Temple Grandin's commentary and it gave me a new look into what the story was really about.

Highly recommended. HBO has been making great cinema for some time. This is a gem. And it is all about cattle, and autism, and ethics, and a person who rises way above expectations.

Temple Grandin has also given a TED talk, and it is classic autism advocacy by a person who knows what it is about.


Sorry, didn't mean to highjack the thread with autism advocacy, but Grandin, above all, seems to understand cows. So, I thought it might be helpful to this post.

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Response to longship (Reply #5)

Sat Jun 1, 2013, 05:18 PM

7. It is most helpful and welcome

Some of us just plain old love animals, period, and she's a hero to us.

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