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Rocknation

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Hometown: New Jersey
Home country: USA
Member since: 2001
Number of posts: 44,203

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An Amazing Summation Of Christie (Written Thirty-Five Years Ago)

about a character that was invented nearly one hundred years ago:

The Great Gatsby...is a very great American novel with a considerable bearing...on any story in which social idea...reality, spirit, and money are understood in their relation to each other...

A half century ago...(Gatsby) was already inventing American society although he mistakenly supposed that it existed, and that it was Daisy and Tom Buchanan. What defined his life was not our present-day belief that money buys class, but the far more radical conviction that if money was legitimately come by, it was class, and...(therefore) conferred moral stature. When he died, Gatsby was still seeking not only a means of self-realization but a means of social incarnation as well...

(The Great Gatsby's author) F. Scott Fitzgerald was not afraid of the word "vulgar"...


-- Diana Trilling, Mrs. Harris: The Death Of The Scarsdale Diet Doctor, 1981

Substitute Governor Soprano for Gatsby, Donald Trump for Tom Buchanan, Bruce Springsteen for Daisy Buchanan, and you've got a remake in the making!


rocktivity

Here's how I originally heard the joke

"Would you sleep with me for a million dollars?"
"Yes."
"Would you sleep with me for five dollars?"
"Hell, no! What do you think I am?"
"We've ESTABLISHED what you are. Now we're just negotiating the price."

Misogynistic and vile? Hell, yes -- because the joke trades on the inconvenient truth that people who exchange money for sex (traditionally male) have moral, social, and legal ascendancy over people (traditionally female) who exchange sex for money. But if you substitute loyalty, integrity, or ambition (especially political ambition) for the sex, and any kind of reward or favoritism for the money, the joke also functions in the "respectable" world. I actually heard an MSNBC commentator say it of a politician, "Well, now we know what he is -- AND we know his price!"


rocktivity

This is not the campaign that Hillary Clinton and the party envisioned...

Huffington Post: Sen. Bernie Sanders' victory over Hillary Clinton in the New Hampshire Democratic presidential primary all but guarantees the party what it wanted to avoid: a long, costly, and potentially damaging primary fight to determine the nominee...

(But) even amid the dour news on Tuesday night, there was confident talk. "We'll do well in March. And that's where the ballgame is," Clinton campaign Chairman John Podesta said. The (Clinton) campaign released a three-page memo...touting (her) strength in the upcoming states and noting, rightly, that there were far more delegates to gain there...

(T)he memo read..."In total, 1,875 delegates will be awarded in the first 15 days of March, including nearly 900 on Super Tuesday alone. When you take into account the large number of Super Delegate commitments we’ve secured, as well as Hillary’s commanding lead in the polls in delegate-rich states, she is in a very strong position to become the nominee."

That Clinton's team has to rely on sharp analytics and delegate math-crunching to make the case for her winning the nomination is, in and of itself, remarkable. She wasn't supposed to be in this type of protracted struggle, certainly not against someone who wasn't even a Democrat...


Easy on the melodrama, Huffpo -- two primary contests, one of which was held in a candidate's back yard, do not a "protracted struggle" make. But it does mean that it's time to get this out of the mothballs:




As for Hillary's treasury of superdelegate commitments, here's another little artifact from 2008:




I'm not saying that Hillary's approach can't work, just that it didn't work last time.


rocktivity

Newton isn't sorry for acting like sore loser

Courier-Tribune: Cam Newton isn’t apologizing for acting like a “sore loser” after the Super Bowl. The league’s MVP has been widely criticized for walking out of a three-minute press conference after a 24-10 loss to the Denver Broncos on Sunday in which he answered questions with mostly one- and two-word responses while sulking in his chair wearing a black Carolina Panthers hoodie over his head.

“Show me a good loser and I’ll show you a loser,” Newton said Tuesday as players cleaned out their lockers at the team’s downtown stadium.

“If I offended anybody that’s cool, but I know who I am and I’m not about to conform nor bend for anybody’s expectations because yours or anybody’s expectations would never exceed mine...Who are you to say that your way is right? I have all of these people who are condemning and saying this, that and the third, but what makes your way right?”

Panthers coach Ron Rivera said while he prefers his fifth-year quarterback would have handled the situation a little better, he understands where he is coming from and what he felt at the time. “That’s who he is. He hates to lose, that’s the bottom line,” Rivera said. “That is what you love in him. I would much rather have a guy who hates to lose than a guy who accepts it. The guy who accepts it, you might as well just push him out of your locker room because you don’t want him around..."

Show me a bad loser, and I'll show you a possibly psychotic overgrown brat. And a bad leader. AND a loser....


rocktivity

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