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Divernan

Divernan's Journal
Divernan's Journal
July 3, 2015

"OK, now Hillary Clinton seems to have some problems in Iowa"

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-fix/wp/2015/07/02/ok-now-hillary-clinton-is-starting-to-have-some-problems-in-iowa/

The photo above was taken in Madison, Wis., a little more than 100 miles from the border of Iowa, where a reported 10,000 people came to hear Bernie Sanders speak Wednesday. The polling strength of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) in Iowa is almost certainly in part due to the proximity of his state, so all of those excited Wisconsinites aren't what Clinton's team wants to see.

The new poll from Quinnipiac University shows Clinton's lead in the state down to 19 points. It was 45 points in Quinnipiac polling in May.

What's interesting is that this is not the same scenario as we see in Bloomberg's polling. Clinton has seen a tangible erosion of support among men and the very liberal -- to the point that she actually trails among the latter group. But she's also seen a big drop in support from women in the state. That's a 12-point drop among women, in a poll with a margin of error of 3.6 points. It's real.

When we were tossing cold water on the Bloomberg poll, we aggregated the anyone-but-Hillary vote to compare it to the front-runner. Here, you can see that the not-Hillary vote has markedly increased -- meaning that the number of people voting against Clinton isn't just switching between candidates, but that people are moving away from her. The contingent of people who prefer a not-Clinton candidate is at 44 percent. That's ... not good for Clinton. (M)ore polls like this one -- and more photos like the one at the top -- and Clinton staffers will need to start ordering Ambien by the crate.
July 3, 2015

Letter from Bernie re last night in Madison, WI.

Nancy -

We made a bit of history last night in Madison, Wisconsin.

Ten thousand people showed up at an event of ours — that’s more people who have come together for a presidential campaign event than any other candidate has had in 2015.

This is important.

It’s important because despite what the media would have you think, politics is not a game or a soap opera. Politics is ultimately about people coming together to improve the lives of all Americans, and not just a handful of wealthy campaign contributors.

And on July 29th, I am asking Americans from across the country to come together for a series of conversations about how we can organize an unprecedented grassroots movement that takes on the greed of Wall Street and the billionaire class.

Add your name and let me know if you’re interested in hosting or attending an organizing meeting for our campaign on July 29th, and we’ll be in touch with more information early next week.
The truth is that the big money interests, Wall Street, and corporate America have so much power that no president, no matter how great he or she may be, can defeat them unless there is an organized grassroots movement.

They have the money, but we have the people. And if we stand together, there’s nothing we cannot accomplish.


We can provide healthcare to every man, woman, and child as a right.

We can make certain that every person can get all the education they need regardless of income
And on July 29th, I am asking Americans from across the country to come together for a series of conversations about how we can organize an unprecedented grassroots movement that takes on the greed of Wall Street and the billionaire class.

We can create millions of jobs by rebuilding our crumbling roads and bridges.
We can have the best child care system in the world.

But change will not come without political participation. That's why it's so important that we come together in our communities to organize for the change we want to see in America.

Let me know that you’re willing to host or attend an organizing meeting on July 29th and we’ll be in touch with more information early next week.

I am more than aware that our opponents will be able to outspend us.

But we are going to win this election.

Bernie Sanders

https://go.berniesanders.com/page/s/organizing-meetings?source=em150702&utm_medium=email&utm_source=berniesanders&utm_campaign=organizingmeetings&utm_content=madison

July 2, 2015

Latest Iowa straw Poll: Sanders more than doubles, from 15 to 33%

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is gaining ground on former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in the Iowa Democratic Caucus and now trails the front-runner 52 - 33 percent among likely Democratic Caucus participants, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released today. Vice President Joseph Biden has 7 percent.

This compares to a 60 - 15 percent Clinton lead over Sanders in a May 7 survey of likely Democratic caucus-goers by the independent Quinnipiac (KWIN-uh-pe-ack) University.

In today's survey, former Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley has 3 percent with one percent for former U.S. Sen. James Webb of Virginia. Another 5 percent are undecided.

Among Democrats 7 percent say they would definitely not support Biden, Webb or former Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee and 6 percent say they would not support Clinton.

"Secretary Hillary Clinton should not be biting her fingernails over her situation in the Iowa caucus, but her lead is slipping and Sen. Bernie Sanders is making progress against her. Her 52 percent score among likely caucus-goers is still OK, but this is the first time she has been below 60 percent in Quinnipiac University's Iowa survey," said Peter A. Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Poll.

"But Sen. Sanders has more than doubled his showing and at 33 percent he certainly can't be ignored, especially with seven months until the actual voting. Iowa Democratic caucus-goers are generally considered more liberal than primary voters in most other states, a demographic that helps his insurgency against Secretary Clinton who is the choice of virtually the entire Democratic establishment." http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/quinnipiac-university-poll/iowa/release-detail?ReleaseID=2259

July 2, 2015

HuffPo Front Page Lead: "BERNIMANIA" (THEIR ALL CAPS, NOT MINE!)

Wednesday's rally was Sanders' largest yet, and may be the biggest of the 2016 cycle overall. Clinton's campaign launch drew approximately 5,500 people to New York City's Roosevelt Island, while about 3,000 supporters attended Jeb Bush's kickoff in Miami.

Sanders' progressive messages resonated strongly in Wisconsin's liberal, capital city. "The big money interests — Wall Street, corporate America, all of these guys — have so much power that no president can defeat them unless there is an organized grassroots movement making them an offer they can't refuse," he said as the crowd erupted in cheers, the AP reported.

"When you deny the right of workers to come together in collective bargaining, that's extremism," Sanders said, going after Wisconsin Gov. and White House hopeful Scott Walker. "When you tell a woman that she cannot control her own body, that's extremism.


The HuffPo lead article includes some impressive photos tweeted by reporters of the huge crowd.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/01/bernie-sanders-madison_n_7709966.html
July 2, 2015

The Hill: Sanders Draws MASSIVE Crowd in Wisconsin

http://thehill.com/blogs/ballot-box/dem-primaries/246732-sanders-draws-massive-crowd-in-wisconsin

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders drew 10,000 supporters, the largest crowd of his campaign thus far, according to reports.

"Tonight, we have more people at any meeting for a candidate of president of the United States than any other candidate,” Sanders told his fans at Veterans Memorial Coliseum in Madison, Wis., according to the Associated Press.

Sanders used the occasion to slam Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, a likely Republican White House hopeful, for Walker’s battles against state labor unions.

Sanders continued beating his populist drum, to the delight of his supporters. "The big money interests — Wall Street, corporate America, all of these guys — have so much power that no president can defeat them unless there is an organized grassroots movement making them an offer they can't refuse," he said.

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