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BeyondGeography

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Gender: Male
Hometown: NY
Member since: Tue Dec 30, 2003, 12:41 AM
Number of posts: 36,824

Journal Archives

Patria (HBO)

Brilliant and binge-worthy.

Two Basque families torn apart by nationalism and ETA violence:

“The personal aspect is key to the series,” says “Patria” producer Miguel Salvat.

“Patria” focuses on a 60-something woman, Bittori, who has cancer, who returns to her native village in the Basque Country Gipuzkoa and seeks reconciliation with her best friend, after they were torn part by the Basque conflict.

“Patria’ is not about ETA. It’s a journey towards an embrace,” Gabilondo told the Spanish press at San Sebastian.

“The novel describes how normal people lived, people who weren’t politicians, in the military nor police, nor terrorists,” Gabilondo told Variety.

“It turns on the suffering on the street, how everybody was worried about what was going out, and didn’t talk, couldn’t really comment, or feel, without running the risk of being said to be on this side of the fence, and being used.”

https://hollywoodfact.com/hbo-patria-footage-focus-on-basque-conflict-variety/


Elena Irureta’s performance as Bittori is spellbinding, and she has a lot of company on the cast. Even the intro is a work of art:


Posted by BeyondGeography | Mon Mar 1, 2021, 12:54 AM (2 replies)

A third of CPAC wants to cancel Trump

https://twitter.com/MtnGrl4/status/1366124530536603648
Posted by BeyondGeography | Sun Feb 28, 2021, 05:14 PM (12 replies)

Andrew Yang comes to aid of photographer attacked on Staten Island Ferry

https://twitter.com/videos_boomer/status/1365454444456865793
STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. — Andrew Yang, a former Democratic presidential candidate and current frontrunner in the race for NYC mayor, came to the rescue of a photojournalist who was attacked Friday on the Staten Island Ferry.

Yang was traveling on the 11 a.m. boat from Manhattan to Staten Island for a tour of the borough, accompanied by his press staff and a few members of the media, including Getty photographer Spencer Platt.

When a ferry passenger carrying what appeared to be a metal pole approached the photographer, shoved him, and threateningly raised the implement, Yang sprang into action.

“I think most people would have the same impulse I had,” Yang said of the incident. “To try and do anything that you can to protect somebody who might be threatened or endangered.”

The man recognized Yang, who engaged and calmed him, speaking with him briefly and allowing the photographer to get away from the tense situation...

https://www.silive.com/nycmayor/2021/02/andrew-yang-comes-to-aid-of-photographer-attacked-on-staten-island-ferry.html
Posted by BeyondGeography | Sat Feb 27, 2021, 04:02 AM (26 replies)

House passes $1.9 trillion Covid relief bill with $1,400 checks, vaccine funding

Source: NBC News

WASHINGTON — The House voted early Saturday to pass President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion Covid-19 relief package, a step to implementing his vision for bringing the pandemic under control just days after the U.S. crossed the tragic milestone of 500,000 deaths.

The Democratic-controlled House voted 219 to 212 to approve the bill, which includes $1,400 direct payments, a $400-a-week federal unemployment bonus, a per-child allowance of up to $3,600 for one year and billions of dollars to distribute the coronavirus vaccines and to assist schools and local governments.

The vote split largely on partisan lines, with every Republican voting against the measure and just two Democrats joining them — Jared Golden of Maine and Kurt Schrader of Oregon.

The bill now goes to the Senate, where a provision to raise the minimum wage is likely to be removed. But the rest of the package is in good shape to pass as Democrats are using a process that doesn't require Republican support.

Read more: https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/congress/house-vote-biden-s-1-9-trillion-covid-relief-bill-n1258883
Posted by BeyondGeography | Sat Feb 27, 2021, 03:48 AM (12 replies)

Hawley (T-MO) announces bill to require $15 minimum wage for billion-dollar corporations

https://twitter.com/_StephanieMyers/status/1365290980002328583
Posted by BeyondGeography | Fri Feb 26, 2021, 09:36 AM (20 replies)

Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Former Saudi Oil Minister, Dies at 90

Ahmed Zaki Yamani, Saudi Arabia’s powerful oil minister and architect of the Arab world’s drive to control its own energy resources in the 1970s and its subsequent ability to affect oil production, fuel prices and international affairs, died in London. He was 90.

His death was announced on Tuesday by Saudi state television.

In an era of turbulent energy politics, Mr. Yamani, a Harvard-trained lawyer, spoke for Arab oil producers on a world stage as the industry weathered Arab-Israeli wars, a revolution in Iran and growing pains. The world’s demand for oil lifted the governments of Saudi Arabia and other Persian Gulf states into realms of unimaginable wealth. Crossing Europe, Asia and America to promote Arab oil interests, he met government leaders, went on television and became widely known. In a flowing Arabian robe or a Savile Row suit, speaking English or French, he straddled cultures, loving European classical music and writing Arabic poetry.

Mr. Yamani generally strived for price stability and orderly markets, but he is best known for engineering a 1973 oil embargo that led to soaring global prices, gasoline shortages and a quest for smaller cars, renewable energy sources and independence from Arab oil.

As the Saudi oil minister from 1962 to 1986, Mr. Yamani was the most powerful commoner in a kingdom that possessed some of the world’s largest oil reserves. For nearly 25 years, he was also the dominant official of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries, whose rising and falling production quotas rippled like tides through worldwide markets.

More at https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/23/business/ahmed-zaki-yamani-dead.html?action=click&module=News&pgtype=Homepage

Posted by BeyondGeography | Tue Feb 23, 2021, 07:55 AM (0 replies)

Marsha Blackburn reading questions provided by some wingnut source

Lazy Republicans can’t even make up their own bullshit.

Pathethic.
Posted by BeyondGeography | Mon Feb 22, 2021, 03:06 PM (2 replies)

AOC offers Texans FEMA assistance tips

Wag wonders if Cruz will give it a try:

https://twitter.com/NeedBirds/status/1363553607660937218

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez
@AOC
TEXANS: FEMA assistance is now available for you to apply at http://disasterassistance.gov
Make sure you take photos Camera with flash , keep all receipts Receipt, and document EVERYTHING you can to rebuild.

NeedBirds
@NeedBirds
Ted Cruz is going to take pictures of his airline tickets to try and get reimbursed, isn't he?
Posted by BeyondGeography | Sun Feb 21, 2021, 04:11 PM (0 replies)

Celia Cruz Sound Check (Guantanamera)

Posted by BeyondGeography | Tue Feb 16, 2021, 12:02 AM (0 replies)

Johnny Pacheco, Who Helped Bring Salsa to the World, Dies at 85

Johnny Pacheco, the Dominican-born bandleader who co-founded the record label that turned salsa music into a worldwide sensation, died on Monday in Teaneck, N.J. He was 85. His wife, Maria Elena Pacheco, who is known as Cuqui, confirmed the death, at Holy Name Medical Center. Mr. Pacheco lived in Fort Lee, N.J.

Fania Records, which he founded with Jerry Masucci in 1964, signed Latin music’s hottest talents of the 1960s and ’70s, including Celia Cruz, Willie Colón, Hector Lavoe and Rubén Blades. Mr. Pacheco, a gifted flutist, led the way on and off the stage, working as a songwriter, arranger and leader of the Fania All Stars, salsa’s first supergroup.

...From its humble beginnings in Harlem and the Bronx — where releases were sold from the trunks of cars — Fania brought an urbane sensibility to Latin music. In New York, the music had taken on the name “salsa” (Spanish for sauce, as in hot sauce), and the Fania label began using it as part of its marketing.

Guided by Mr. Pacheco, artists built a new sound based on traditional clave rhythms and the genre Cuban son (or son Cubano), but faster and more aggressive. Many of the lyrics — about racism, cultural pride and the tumultuous politics of the era — were far removed from the pastoral and romantic scenes in traditional Cuban songs.

In that sense, salsa was “homegrown American music, as much a part of the indigenous musical landscape as jazz or rock or hip-hop,” Jody Rosen wrote in The New York Times in 2006 on the occasion of the reissue of the Fania master tapes — after they had spent years gathering mold in a warehouse in Hudson, N.Y.

More at https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/15/arts/music/johnny-pacheco-dead.html

Posted by BeyondGeography | Mon Feb 15, 2021, 11:30 PM (2 replies)
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