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Sherman A1

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Gender: Male
Current location: U.S.
Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 06:37 AM
Number of posts: 35,275

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Solar-powered benches installed in Jefferson City

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. - The Jefferson City Parks and Recreation Department has installed the first of five solar-powered benches equipped with LED lighting and charging ports.

Amy Schroeder, Jefferson City's community relations manager, said the solar powered seating promotes environmental sustainability, the lighting and phone charging provides a level of safety and security and the banner space promotes the city's services and amenities.

Each bench costs just under $5,000 for a total of $24,950.

https://www.abc17news.com/news/solar-powered-benches-installed-in-jefferson-city/1072411211

AdventHealth Tampa 1st In Florida To Automate Lab Tests

TAMPA, FL - From AdventHealth Tampa: AdventHealth Tampa is leading the way as the first hospital in the Florida to go live with the innovative cobas® 8100 Roche automated system. AdventHealth Tampa performs more than five million lab tests per year and with the innovative cobas® 8100 system, the laboratory team provides an industry leading turnaround time of less than 30 minutes for a lab test. The fully automated system allows hospital staff to cut down on the time it takes for doctors and patients to receive diagnostic and blood work results.

Leaders will cut the ribbon on the fully automated lab and offer demonstrations on Tuesday, April 16 at 10 a.m.

"AdventHealth Tampa is on the forefront of leading-edge innovation and technology," said Brian Adams, President and CEO of AdventHealth Tampa. "This lab expansion allows us to continue to set the standard in our community to provide exceptional service to every patient, every time."

https://patch.com/florida/seminoleheights/s/gowpf/adventhealth-tampa-1st-florida-automate-lab-tests?

More automation.....How long before there are staff cuts?

Walmart experiments with AI to monitor stores in real time

LEVITTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Who’s minding the store? In the not-too-distant future it could be cameras and sensors that can tell almost instantly when bruised bananas need to be swapped for fresh ones and more cash registers need to open before lines get too long.

Walmart, which faces fierce competition from Amazon and other online retailers, is experimenting with digitizing its physical stores to manage them more efficiently, keep costs under control and make the shopping experience more pleasant. On Thursday, the retail giant officially opens its Intelligent Retail Lab inside a 50,000-square-foot Neighborhood Market grocery store on Long Island.

Thousands of cameras suspended from the ceiling, combined with other technology like sensors on shelves, will monitor the store in real time so workers can quickly replenish products or fix other problems.

The technology, shown first to The Associated Press, will also be able to spot spills, track when shelves need to be restocked and know when shopping carts are running low. Cameras, for example, can determine how ripe bananas are from their color, and workers will get an alert on their phone if they need to be replaced.

https://apnews.com/d416ba3945d64975994805db55467744

Treasurer Promotes Savings Accounts For Missourians With Disabilities

Missouri Treasurer Scott Fitzpatrick marked his 100th day in office by visiting St. Louis Children’s Hospital Wednesday to promote a savings program for people with disabilities.

Gov. Mike Parson appointed Fitzpatrick to become treasurer in January. He succeeded Eric Schmitt, who resigned to become attorney general.

Fitzpatrick is seeking to get more people to sign up for ABLE accounts. Those allow Missouri residents with disabilities to save tax-free money without losing benefits such as Social Security Disability Insurance.

One of the things that Fitzpatrick is trying to do is get employers to directly deposit money from their paycheck into ABLE accounts. He recently secured such an arrangement with CoxHealth.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/treasurer-promotes-savings-accounts-missourians-disabilities

The Isley Brothers Arrive On The St. Louis Walk Of Fame


Soul music fans who turned on the radio in the 1960s and ‘70s were bound to hear a song from the influential group, The Isley Brothers. The world renowned band has released both ballads and funk anthems that have now shaped generations of music.

On Wednesday, Ronald and Ernie Isley joined the likes of Maya Angelou, Stan Musial, Nelly and other St. Louis celebrities with their addition to the St. Louis Walk of Fame. The brothers were honored at a ceremony outside of The Pageant.

“I’m glad to be amongst some of the great people: Tina Turner, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry. You know, it’s wonderful,” Ronald Isley said.

Both brothers moved to St. Louis in 1998, though the two originally hail from Cincinnati, Ohio. Ronald Isley said they go to church in the St. Louis area. He also said his son attends school in St. Louis.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/isley-brothers-arrive-st-louis-walk-fame

The Isley Brothers Arrive On The St. Louis Walk Of Fame

Soul music fans who turned on the radio in the 1960s and ‘70s were bound to hear a song from the influential group, The Isley Brothers. The world renowned band has released both ballads and funk anthems that have now shaped generations of music.

On Wednesday, Ronald and Ernie Isley joined the likes of Maya Angelou, Stan Musial, Nelly and other St. Louis celebrities with their addition to the St. Louis Walk of Fame. The brothers were honored at a ceremony outside of The Pageant.

“I’m glad to be amongst some of the great people: Tina Turner, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry. You know, it’s wonderful,” Ronald Isley said.

Both brothers moved to St. Louis in 1998, though the two originally hail from Cincinnati, Ohio. Ronald Isley said they go to church in the St. Louis area. He also said his son attends school in St. Louis.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/isley-brothers-arrive-st-louis-walk-fame

Feeding Cahokia' Outlines New Findings About Agriculture, Women And Life In Ancient Civilization


Cahokia Mounds – the peaceful, sprawling historic site that sits just outside Collinsville, Illinois – was once home to thousands of people. Contemporary understandings of what life was like within the thriving ancient civilization continue to evolve and expand, and Washington University paleoethnobiologist Gayle Fritz’s new research is part of that.

Her new book “Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland” presents fresh findings about Cahokian agriculture – and about the role and status of the women who took the lead in this aspect of daily life.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, the professor emerita of anthropology joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl to talk about it.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/feeding-cahokia-outlines-new-findings-about-agriculture-women-and-life-ancient-civilization

'Feeding Cahokia' Outlines New Findings About Agriculture, Women And Life In Ancient Civilization


Cahokia Mounds – the peaceful, sprawling historic site that sits just outside Collinsville, Illinois – was once home to thousands of people. Contemporary understandings of what life was like within the thriving ancient civilization continue to evolve and expand, and Washington University paleoethnobiologist Gayle Fritz’s new research is part of that.

Her new book “Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland” presents fresh findings about Cahokian agriculture – and about the role and status of the women who took the lead in this aspect of daily life.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, the professor emerita of anthropology joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl to talk about it.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/feeding-cahokia-outlines-new-findings-about-agriculture-women-and-life-ancient-civilization

'Feeding Cahokia' Outlines New Findings About Agriculture, Women And Life In Ancient Civilization

Cahokia Mounds – the peaceful, sprawling historic site that sits just outside Collinsville, Illinois – was once home to thousands of people. Contemporary understandings of what life was like within the thriving ancient civilization continue to evolve and expand, and Washington University paleoethnobiologist Gayle Fritz’s new research is part of that.

Her new book “Feeding Cahokia: Early Agriculture in the North American Heartland” presents fresh findings about Cahokian agriculture – and about the role and status of the women who took the lead in this aspect of daily life.

On Wednesday’s St. Louis on the Air, the professor emerita of anthropology joined St. Louis Public Radio’s Jonathan Ahl to talk about it.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/feeding-cahokia-outlines-new-findings-about-agriculture-women-and-life-ancient-civilization

We should welcome workers' 'powerful victory' in the Stop & Shop strike

On Sunday evening, in what it called a “powerful victory,” the United Food & Commercial workers union (UFCW) reached a tentative agreement with Stop & Shop management to end a strike by 31,000 workers in over 240 grocery stores in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut, which began April 11. In hindsight, the 11-day strike, the largest retail strike in the U.S. since 2003, could turn out to be one of the most important work stoppages of the past few decades.

The workers struck to resist demands from the company – which is owned by Dutch giant, Royal Ahold Delhaize – for sweeping reductions in health care and pension benefits and reduced pay for Sunday work. But, according to the union, under Sunday’s three-year settlement, existing health care and pension plans and time-and-a-half for Sunday work are maintained.

Stop & Shop demands for health care and pension concessions from some of its lowest paid workers were not borne out of financial necessity. Ahold Delhaize is highly profitable in the United States. In 2018, it generated sales of $44 billion from all its U.S. food businesses (the company also owns the Food Lion, Giant, and Hannaford supermarket chains, and the Peapod grocery delivery service), with Stop & Shop supermarkets contributing about $8 billion of that total. The U.S. accounts for approximately two-thirds of the Dutch multinationals overall revenues. Rather, the company was seeking to claw back hard won worker benefits in order to be more like its non-union, low road rivals.

https://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/labor/440271-we-should-welcome-workers-powerful-victory-in-the-stop-shop-strike?
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