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Sherman A1

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Gender: Male
Current location: U.S.
Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 07:37 AM
Number of posts: 34,063

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Missouri S&T Military Historian Reflects On Legacy And Lessons Of D-Day 75 Years Later


Seventy-five years ago, Allied forces invaded northern France in a sweeping campaign that proved to be a key turning point during World War II.

Joining Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day was military historian John McManus. He is a professor of history at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, and the author of “The Dead and Those Who Are About To Die: D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach” among other books about the war.

While traveling in Europe for events related to the 75-year mark, McManus spoke with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin, delving into what occurred on June 6, 1944, why it still resonates and what people today can learn from studying and reflecting on the tragedy of war.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-st-military-historian-reflects-legacy-and-lessons-d-day-75-years-later

Missouri S&T Military Historian Reflects On Legacy And Lessons Of D-Day 75 Years Later


Seventy-five years ago, Allied forces invaded northern France in a sweeping campaign that proved to be a key turning point during World War II.

Joining Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day was military historian John McManus. He is a professor of history at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, and the author of “The Dead and Those Who Are About To Die: D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach” among other books about the war.

While traveling in Europe for events related to the 75-year mark, McManus spoke with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin, delving into what occurred on June 6, 1944, why it still resonates and what people today can learn from studying and reflecting on the tragedy of war.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-st-military-historian-reflects-legacy-and-lessons-d-day-75-years-later

Missouri S&T Military Historian Reflects On Legacy And Lessons Of D-Day 75 Years Later

Seventy-five years ago, Allied forces invaded northern France in a sweeping campaign that proved to be a key turning point during World War II.

Joining Thursday’s St. Louis on the Air in commemoration of the 75th anniversary of D-Day was military historian John McManus. He is a professor of history at Missouri S&T in Rolla, Missouri, and the author of “The Dead and Those Who Are About To Die: D-Day: The Big Red One at Omaha Beach” among other books about the war.

While traveling in Europe for events related to the 75-year mark, McManus spoke with St. Louis Public Radio’s Jeremy D. Goodwin, delving into what occurred on June 6, 1944, why it still resonates and what people today can learn from studying and reflecting on the tragedy of war.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/missouri-st-military-historian-reflects-legacy-and-lessons-d-day-75-years-later

Must make universal basic income 'right of citizenship' in US: 2020 hopeful Yang

Must make universal basic income 'right of citizenship' in US: 2020 hopeful Yang

Andrew Yang Interview on Bloomberg Politics.

Referendums To Overturn New Abortion Ban Rejected By Missouri Secretary Of State

Updated at 2 p.m. on Thursday with comments from Lowell Pearson and Jay Ashcroft:

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft rejected bids to place a newly signed abortion ban up for a statewide vote in 2020, citing the fact that a provision in the measure goes into effect right away.

At least one group seeking to overturn the eight-week ban is pledging to go to court against the GOP statewide official’s action.

Both the American Civil Liberties Union of Missouri and Joplin businessman David Humphreys, a major Republican donor, are seeking to overturn what’s known as HB 126. Missouri’s Constitution sets up a process to put any piece of legislation signed into law up for a statewide referendum. However, the constitution prohibits referendums for laws that are “necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health or safety.”

That’s boilerplate language for what’s known as an emergency clause, which makes either an entire law or part of a law go into effect immediately after a governor signs it. In the bill Parson signed last month, there’s an emergency clause for a provision requiring notification to both parents in some circumstances if a minor is seeking an abortion. And Ashcroft cited that for rejecting two of three referendum proposals submitted to his office.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/referendums-overturn-new-abortion-ban-rejected-missouri-secretary-state

Andrew Yang to be on Real Time with Bill Maher Friday, June 7

Bill and his roundtable guests - Andrew Yang, Rep. Katie Porter, Charles Blow, Clint Watts & Bret Easton Ellis - will answer viewer questions after Friday's show.

Submit your questions in the comments section below. Selected questions will be answered on the Real Time Youtube Channel immediately following the premiere. Please be aware that concise (50 words or less) single-topic questions have the best chance of being selected, so the shorter and more specific you can be, the better.

http://www.real-time-with-bill-maher-blog.com/index/2019/6/4/submit-your-overtime-questions-for-june-7-2019?

A solution for childhood obesity? Universal basic income


A new study links an extra $1,000 a year paid through Alaska's Permanent Fund Dividend to a 4.5% reduction in the rate of obesity in children.

The annual dividend to residents generated by Alaska's oil riches also reduced total medical costs statewide by up to $10 million, the study estimated.

Various tests of a universal basic income are underway in the U.S. and other countries.

Sure, the extra money is helpful. But the most intriguing benefit from a universal basic income -- a regular cash transfer to all individuals regardless of their employment status or income level -- could be that it may help reduce childhood obesity.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/universal-basic-income-could-help-solve-childhood-obesity/

A solution for childhood obesity? Universal basic income

A new study links an extra $1,000 a year paid through Alaska's Permanent Fund Dividend to a 4.5% reduction in the rate of obesity in children.

The annual dividend to residents generated by Alaska's oil riches also reduced total medical costs statewide by up to $10 million, the study estimated.

Various tests of a universal basic income are underway in the U.S. and other countries.

Sure, the extra money is helpful. But the most intriguing benefit from a universal basic income -- a regular cash transfer to all individuals regardless of their employment status or income level -- could be that it may help reduce childhood obesity.

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/universal-basic-income-could-help-solve-childhood-obesity/
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