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Sherman A1

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Gender: Male
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Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 06:37 AM
Number of posts: 35,284

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Fort Leonard Wood Restores Building And Mural To Honor Segregation-Era Soldiers


The mostly nondescript Building 2101 at Fort Leonard Wood was the home of the Black Officers' Club before the Army was desegregated in 1948.

The building had been slated for demolition, but a preservation effort restored it. The goal is to honor African American soldiers who served in difficult times.

The restoration included a mural by Staff Sgt. Samuel Countee painted above the fireplace in 1945. Countee’s niece, Sammie Ellis, said the project honors the values of her uncle and his fellow soldiers.

“They were going forward to represent the country and defend it,” Ellis said. “And I believe what my uncle did exemplifies what we should all be about.”

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/fort-leonard-wood-restores-building-and-mural-honor-segregation-era-soldiers

Fort Leonard Wood Restores Building And Mural To Honor Segregation-Era Soldiers

The mostly nondescript Building 2101 at Fort Leonard Wood was the home of the Black Officers' Club before the Army was desegregated in 1948.

The building had been slated for demolition, but a preservation effort restored it. The goal is to honor African American soldiers who served in difficult times.

The restoration included a mural by Staff Sgt. Samuel Countee painted above the fireplace in 1945. Countee’s niece, Sammie Ellis, said the project honors the values of her uncle and his fellow soldiers.

“They were going forward to represent the country and defend it,” Ellis said. “And I believe what my uncle did exemplifies what we should all be about.”

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/fort-leonard-wood-restores-building-and-mural-honor-segregation-era-soldiers

Feral Hogs In The Mark Twain Forest Are Trouble, But Hunting Them May Not Be An Option

Feral hogs are causing major damage to the Mark Twain National Forest.

The animals dig up grasslands and crops, they eat eggs and baby wildlife, and scratching an itch on their backs can literally strip the bark off a tree.

Hunters want a chance to help out with this menace that can weigh over 200 pounds and produce 40 to 50 offspring a year. But the National Forest Service is considering outlawing feral hog hunts on public land in the Mark Twain.

Sherri Schwenke, forest supervisor at Mark Twain, said trapping is the most effective way to get rid of feral hogs.

Feral hogs are causing major damage to the Mark Twain National Forest.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/feral-hogs-mark-twain-forest-are-trouble-hunting-them-may-not-be-option

Galloway Jumps In 2020 Gubernatorial Contest, Setting Up Likely Matchup Against Parson

State Auditor Nicole Galloway officially launched her 2020 gubernatorial bid on Monday morning, emphasizing her record as Missouri’s lone Democratic statewide official and criticizing how a GOP-controlled government has operated.

While Galloway will likely have little competition capturing the Democratic nomination for governor, she will face a challenge from a state that leans toward the GOP — and the current governor's financial advantage.

Galloway’s announcement via a web video stressed her biography as a Fenton native and tenure as state auditor. She points out how her office uncovered government fraud and abuse and discovered misdeeds that sent public officials to jail.

She also criticized the GOP-controlled legislature for passing a ban on most abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy — and for trying to place a new state legislative redistricting system on the 2020 ballot after voters approved the measure along with other ethics overhauls in 2018.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/galloway-jumps-2020-gubernatorial-contest-setting-likely-matchup-against-parson

Why Some Parents, Healthcare Experts Worry Active Shooter Drills In Schools Do More Harm Than Good

Dianne Gordon, a mom who lives in Champaign, knew something was wrong with her daughter Rory the minute she stepped off the school bus one afternoon in April.

Rory, a seven-year-old who starts second grade at the Champaign Unit 4 School District this fall, was inconsolable, Gordon said.

“It was heartbreaking,” she said. “She was screaming and yelling. She loves school, and she kept yelling, ‘I don’t want to go back. I don’t want to go back.”

Gordon said Rory told her she was upset by a “bad guy” drill. Champaign Unit 4 school officials confirmed that students at Rory’s elementary school participated in a “hard lockdown drill.” An email sent to Gordon from the school’s principal states that the students were told to remain silent, keep their bodies quiet and calm and listen to their teachers.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/why-some-parents-healthcare-experts-worry-active-shooter-drills-schools-do-more-harm-good

Clay Wants To Clamp Down On Deadly Force By Police

Federal law enforcement officers would have less latitude to use deadly force under a bill U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay plans to introduce.

Clay, D-University City, wants to raise the threshold for when it is acceptable for federal officers to kill a person in confrontations. He said that other tactics — such as de-escalation strategies — should be employed first, and that deadly force should only be used as a last resort.

Through his bill, Clay would also try to force state and local law enforcement agencies to adopt higher standards for engaging in deadly force.

The legislation will call for federal funding to be withheld from local police departments and sheriffs who refuse to raise the bar for shooting or otherwise harming suspects during a confrontation, he said. States would have some discretion on what types of punishments would be in place for not meeting the higher standards.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/clay-wants-clamp-down-deadly-force-police

New BioSTL Building Aims To Grow Bioscience Hub In Cortex

A historic building in the Cortex innovation district is being transformed into a focal point for the St. Louis bioscience industry. At least that’s the intention of BioSTL President and CEO Donn Rubin.

“It’s part of my vision that when a guest to St. Louis comes for a meeting in the biosciences, they will be exposed to not just one company or one entrepreneur, but see an entire community of entrepreneurs — a beehive of startup activity.”

BioSTL this week moves into the rehabbed former Post-Dispatch printing plant, where it signed a 10-year lease as the anchor tenant. The company will take up about half of the 80,000-square-foot building, now known as the BioSTL building.

There, it will bring together its employees and the BioGenerator Labs, which have operated in Cortex for years. The 60 startups that BioSTL’s investment arm supports will make the move, too.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/new-biostl-building-aims-grow-bioscience-hub-cortex

Highway 63 Named Deadliest Road In Missouri

Highway 63, which stretches the length of Missouri and runs through Columbia, Jefferson City and Rolla, has the highest rate of fatal crashes over the past decade of any road in the state, according to a new report.

Fleet management company Geotab compiled data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Highway Administration to calculate the roads with the highest fatal-crash rate in each state.

Highway 63 saw 158 crashes and 179 fatalities in the past 10 years.

State Rep. Don Mayhew, R-Crocker, said he is not surprised by those numbers. He routinely drives a twisted, two-lane section of 63 to go back and forth from his home to Jefferson City.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/highway-63-named-deadliest-road-missouri

Andrew Yang Speaks at the Everytown Gun Safety Forum, Des Moines IA (August 10, 2019)

Andrew Yang Speaks at the Everytown Gun Safety Forum, Des Moines IA (August 10, 2019)

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