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Sherman A1

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Gender: Male
Current location: U.S.
Member since: Sat May 13, 2006, 07:37 AM
Number of posts: 32,362

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Andrew Yang was groomed for a high-paying job at an elite law firm. He lasted five months.

NEW YORK - Andrew Yang's office phone rang at 6 p.m. on a Friday.

He reached for it, then stopped. The staffing coordinator at his New York law firm was calling. If he answered, he knew, he'd be at his desk all weekend editing some dull stack of documents.

It was fall of 1999, and Yang, 24, was in the job he had steered toward his whole life. Phillips Exeter Academy, Brown University, Columbia Law - the perfect elite track to land at Davis Polk & Wardwell, one of the country's premier law firms. His Taiwanese immigrant parents were thrilled. Counting salary and bonus, he was making about $150,000 a year.

But now he looked at the phone, and the nagging whisper in his head was suddenly a screaming alarm: He was in the wrong job. He wanted to be the person creating businesses and deals, not the person writing the contracts.

https://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Andrew-Yang-was-groomed-for-a-high-paying-job-at-14568039.php

Lawyers for officer awarded nearly $20 million offered to settle case in April for $850,000


CLAYTON — St. Louis County Police Sgt. Keith Wildhaber offered to settle his discrimination lawsuit for $850,000 plus a promotion to lieutenant six months before a jury awarded him nearly $20 million, the Post-Dispatch has learned.

On Wednesday, County Counselor Beth Orwick said that the Board of Police Commissioners had refused to settle the case, but did not indicate the amount that had been discussed.

Reached on Thursday, the board’s former chairman, Roland Corvington, declined to comment. The other four members of the police board, Laurie Westfall, Lawrence Wooten, Mark Gaertner and Art Johnson, did not respond to calls and texts from a reporter.

Wildhaber’s attorneys at the Riggan Law Firm sent the terms of the settlement to former St. Louis County Counselor Peter Krane and Assistant County Counselor Mike Hughes on April 5, 2019, according to sources familiar with the case.

https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/lawyers-for-officer-awarded-nearly-million-offered-to-settle-case/article_a1b6f09c-1c80-526d-ba2a-f1d306bf4dbd.html#tracking-source=home-top-story

On Chess: Grand Chess Tour Resumes In Romania Event

After a two-month break, the Grand Chess Tour is back on the chess calendar, starting in Romania and moving on to India for the first time in tour history.

With just two events left before the London finals, it’s crunch time for those players who still hope to qualify for London.

Thus far, world champion Magnus Carlsen has been dominating the tour and is leading with an impressive 54.5 points, having won two of the four events he played and tying for first in one.

He is followed by world No. 3 and the winner of the 2019 Sinquefield Cup, Ding Liren, with 37.8 points. Both players have already punched their tickets to London, while there is still a tight race for the remaining two places.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/chess-grand-chess-tour-resumes-romania-event

Lead Consultant To Airport Privatization Group Responds To Criticism Of Lambert Documentary

Travis Brown is at the center of a controversy over the release Thursday of a three-part documentary about the history of St. Louis Lambert International Airport.

Brown is the executive producer of “Hard Landing At Lambert,” and he owns the media advocacy company — First Rule — that produced and paid for it. He’s also the lead consultant to the city’s Airport Advisory Working Group, which is considering privatizing Lambert.

During a regular meeting Thursday, members of that group grilled Brown over his dual positions.

Head of the working group Paul Payne reiterated concerns he brought up last week, after first learning about the documentary.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/lead-consultant-airport-privatization-group-responds-criticism-lambert-documentary

Belleville's Old Homes Are Attracting New Residents: Here's Who's Moving In And Why

BELLEVILLE — Emily Smith is fascinated by older homes. It’s an interest she’s had since she was a child. As an 8-year-old, she carried around a disposable camera in her backpack just to snap pictures of buildings she liked.

“I’ve always had a fascination with old homes and their character, and the craftsmanship and how it’s like basically living in a piece of art,” she said.

Smith, 32, now lives in a historic home on Abend Street, walking distance from Belleville’s downtown Main Street. She relocated to the area from Charlotte, North Carolina, with her two sons when her husband was stationed at Scott Air Force Base two years ago.

“When we had the opportunity to purchase an old home, I jumped at it,” she said. “I knew this was going to be the time to do it.”

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/belleville-s-old-homes-are-attracting-new-residents-here-s-who-s-moving-and-why

St. Louis MLS Stadium Plan Has Expanded, Team Owners To Buy 30 Acres

A Major League Soccer stadium is coming to the western edge of downtown St. Louis — and it’s going to be bigger than originally thought.

The ownership group of St. Louis’ MLS team released plans Thursday for a nearly 30-acre campus including a 22,500-seat stadium north of Market Street and team offices and practice facilities to the south.

MLS Commissioner Don Garber awarded St. Louis an expansion team in August. The team, which has not been named yet, will begin play in March 2020.

The cost of the expanded project is likely to surpass the $200 million estimate announced this summer. Jim Kavanaugh, a member of the team’s ownership group, said in August that the stadium costs and the league’s $200 million expansion fee would be paid for by the group.

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/st-louis-mls-stadium-plan-has-expanded-team-owners-buy-30-acres

EPA Says Workers Are Done Cleaning Up Carter Carburetor Superfund Site In St. Louis

After six years of building demolitions and excavations, workers have finished cleaning up the Carter Carburetor Superfund site in north St. Louis.

The site, the former location of an oil and diesel carburetor manufacturing plant, closed in 1984. Nearly a decade later, the Environmental Protection Agency included it in the federal Superfund program, which investigates and cleans up hazardous waste sites. It left behind high levels of heavy metals and toxic chemicals, like PCBs, that are known to cause cancer.

EPA placed the site Wednesday on the Administrator’s Emphasis List, a short list of Superfund sites that require the most immediate attention. The listing will expedite the process of making the 10-acre site ready for redevelopment, said Adam Ruiz, a Superfund program manager.

“It allows us to continue to evaluate any kind of obstacles that might be in the way to get the site down the road towards redevelopment,” Ruiz said. “Being on the list allows us to ensure there’s a timely resolution of those issues.”

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/epa-says-workers-are-done-cleaning-carter-carburetor-superfund-site-st-louis

Planned Parenthood's Chief Doctor Testifies Abortions At St. Louis Clinic Are Safe

The chief doctor at Planned Parenthood’s St. Louis clinic testified during a high-profile regulatory hearing on Wednesday that the abortions performed there are safe and that the facility has an above-average record of successful procedures.

State health officials earlier this year decided not to renew the license for Planned Parenthood’s abortion clinic, citing concerns about patient safety.

The four instances of patient care that caused state regulators alarm were in line with acceptable legal and medical standards of care, said Dr. Colleen McNicholas, chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood Reproductive Health Services. The clinic performs thousands of procedures a year, she said.

“There is no clarity about what they see as the problem,” McNicholas said. “I think we’ve repeatedly demonstrated that quality of care can’t be the problem because we continue to provide excellent care.”

https://news.stlpublicradio.org/post/planned-parenthoods-chief-doctor-testifies-abortions-st-louis-clinic-are-safe

The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey


The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey
OCTOBER 23, 2019 BY A PUBLIC AFFAIR

The universal basic income (UBI) movement is gaining momentum in the United States, where cities like Stockton, California have implemented pilot programs and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang is running on a platform heavily based on principles of UBI, including the idea of giving every American a “freedom dividend” of $1,000 per month.

On today’s episode, Ali explores the challenges and possibilities of UBI with Annie Lowrey, author of Give People Money. They discuss prevailing myths and stereotypes about low-income families and “personal responsibility,” the ways UBI addresses racial and gender inequities, what it means to have “enough,” and much more.

Annie Lowrey is a journalist and staff writer for The Atlantic. She has written for the New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and other publications. She is the author of Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World (Crown, 2018).

https://www.wortfm.org/the-case-for-universal-basic-income-with-annie-lowrey

The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey

The Case For Universal Basic Income With Annie Lowrey
OCTOBER 23, 2019 BY A PUBLIC AFFAIR

The universal basic income (UBI) movement is gaining momentum in the United States, where cities like Stockton, California have implemented pilot programs and 2020 presidential candidate Andrew Yang is running on a platform heavily based on principles of UBI, including the idea of giving every American a “freedom dividend” of $1,000 per month.

On today’s episode, Ali explores the challenges and possibilities of UBI with Annie Lowrey, author of Give People Money. They discuss prevailing myths and stereotypes about low-income families and “personal responsibility,” the ways UBI addresses racial and gender inequities, what it means to have “enough,” and much more.

Annie Lowrey is a journalist and staff writer for The Atlantic. She has written for the New York Times, The New York Times Magazine, Slate, and other publications. She is the author of Give People Money: How a Universal Basic Income Would End Poverty, Revolutionize Work, and Remake the World (Crown, 2018).

https://www.wortfm.org/the-case-for-universal-basic-income-with-annie-lowrey
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