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BeyondGeography

(39,495 posts)
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 05:09 PM Aug 2018

Millennials don't suck at voting

Turnout among 18-29 year olds was 50 percent in 2016. That's not terrible, historically speaking.

The first election 18-year-olds could vote, participation in that group was 58 percent (1972), which remains the all-time high.

2000 was the low point at 40 percent. Obama 08 pushed the number up to 52 percent and it went down to 49 percent in 2012. Of course, those are presidential year numbers.

60 percent of them (18-29) voted for Obama in 2012 and 55 percent went for HRC. In 2000, Gore and and Bush tied among 18-24 year-olds at 47 percent. Our buddy Ralph Nader got 5 percent.

Anyway, the kids are alright. I've got a couple of them myself. They vote. They march. They volunteer. One of them does complain about her tax bite though...Can't take these kids for granted.

9 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
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Millennials don't suck at voting (Original Post) BeyondGeography Aug 2018 OP
They turned out for Northam in VA. RandySF Aug 2018 #1
Do they realize that the ultimate candidate is determined in the primary? guillaumeb Aug 2018 #2
New article about millennials and voting today Awsi Dooger Aug 2018 #3
Some of them are ok. NCTraveler Aug 2018 #4
I still can't fathom that people think it's OK not to vote. kacekwl Aug 2018 #5
No they don't suck, but they lag behind other age groups frazzled Aug 2018 #6
This has always been the case, whatever labels you want to use BeyondGeography Aug 2018 #7
Yes, young people have always voted in smaller numbers than other age groups frazzled Aug 2018 #8
Two points BeyondGeography Aug 2018 #9

guillaumeb

(42,641 posts)
2. Do they realize that the ultimate candidate is determined in the primary?
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 05:23 PM
Aug 2018

Pointing out the need for more education in civics/politics.

 

Awsi Dooger

(14,565 posts)
3. New article about millennials and voting today
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 05:27 PM
Aug 2018
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/poll-millennials-disillusioned-about-midterm-elections-n904436

I read it a few hours ago. Lots of stuff. Basically the millennials only have a slightly positive view of the Democratic Party but very negative view of the Republican Party, only 26% to 60% unfavorable.

However, only slightly above half the millennials say they are likely to vote this year, while 8% say they definitely won't vote and 11% probably won't vote and 25% uncertain.

Most demographics view these midterms as roughly the same in importance to past midterms, but a plurality of Asian Americans and Latino Americans view these midterms as more significant than typical

kacekwl

(7,176 posts)
5. I still can't fathom that people think it's OK not to vote.
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 06:04 PM
Aug 2018

It's a banner election if 50% of voters vote. Blows my mind.

frazzled

(18,402 posts)
8. Yes, young people have always voted in smaller numbers than other age groups
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 06:35 PM
Aug 2018

I don’t understand your point. The main lesson is that young people could vote in greater numbers if they cared to. Yes, their numbers have risen and fallen slightly in various years (I think Clinton/Gore in 1992 did the best on youth turnout according to charts I’ve seen), but they’ve always been at the bottom of voter turnout by age.

Millennial currently make up 30% of the voting age population. But then that means 70% of the voting population are not millennials, and those voters vote in significantly larger numbers.

The only thing for sure is that millennials will grow older, and thus, like generations before them, vote more (and probably somewhat more moderately). And that a new generation of young voters will call them sell-outs. So the world turns.

BeyondGeography

(39,495 posts)
9. Two points
Wed Aug 29, 2018, 06:44 PM
Aug 2018

The numbers have been a LOT worse than at present (see 2000).

And they can have a big impact on results when you give them a candidate who excites them (Obama).

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