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Sat Mar 2, 2019, 04:17 PM

A Troubling Discovery in the Deepest Ocean Trenches

For the past decade, Jamieson, a marine biologist at Newcastle University, has been sending vehicles to the bottom of marine trenches, which can be as deep as the Himalayas are tall. Once there, these landers have collected amphipodsóscavenger relatives of crabs and shrimp that thrive in the abyss. Jamieson originally wanted to know how these animals differ from one distant trench to another. But a few years ago, almost on a whim, he decided to analyze their body for toxic, human-made pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, which have been banned for decades but which persist in nature for much longer.

The team found PCBs galore. Some amphipods were carrying levels 50 times higher than those seen in crabs from one of Chinaís most polluted rivers. When the news broke, Jamieson was inundated with calls from journalists and concerned citizens. And in every discussion, one question kept coming up: What about plastics?

Brooks eventually found plastic fibers and fragments in 72 percent of the amphipods that the team collected, from all six trenches that they had surveyed. In the least polluted of these sites, half of the amphipods had swallowed at least one piece of plastic. In the 6.8-mile-deep Mariana Trench, the lowest point in any ocean, all of the specimens had plastic in their gut.
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/deepest-ocean-trenches-animals-eat-plastic/583657/

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Reply A Troubling Discovery in the Deepest Ocean Trenches (Original post)
ProudLib72 Mar 2019 OP
CDerekGo Mar 2019 #1
SoCalDem Mar 2019 #2
defacto7 Mar 2019 #6
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #17
defacto7 Mar 2019 #19
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #29
defacto7 Mar 2019 #33
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #40
leftieNanner Mar 2019 #11
oldsoftie Mar 2019 #15
leftieNanner Mar 2019 #16
BobTheSubgenius Mar 2019 #31
oldsoftie Mar 2019 #36
tosh Mar 2019 #20
cstanleytech Mar 2019 #27
malaise Mar 2019 #3
ProudLib72 Mar 2019 #5
oldsoftie Mar 2019 #10
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #12
ProudLib72 Mar 2019 #37
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #39
ProudLib72 Mar 2019 #41
BSdetect Mar 2019 #4
Evolve Dammit Mar 2019 #25
diva77 Mar 2019 #7
Pantagruel Mar 2019 #8
oldsoftie Mar 2019 #13
airplaneman Mar 2019 #18
crazycatlady Mar 2019 #32
oldsoftie Mar 2019 #35
airplaneman Mar 2019 #43
crazycatlady Mar 2019 #44
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #9
Volaris Mar 2019 #23
littlemissmartypants Mar 2019 #28
certainot Mar 2019 #14
KT2000 Mar 2019 #21
Uncle Joe Mar 2019 #22
SunSeeker Mar 2019 #24
democratisphere Mar 2019 #26
bearssoapbox Mar 2019 #30
MLAA Mar 2019 #34
Blue_true Mar 2019 #42
Demovictory9 Mar 2019 #38

Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 04:30 PM

1. Simply Disturbing

But, where do we start in cleaning this up? I'm recycling everything, my carbon footprint is minimal to say the least (I drive less than 30 miles a week, at most 6000 miles a year) A/C set on 80, heat on 68, double pane windows, extra insulation. But, we have a government riddled with Politicians spouting nonsense denying climate change. Frustrating to say the least.

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Response to CDerekGo (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 04:41 PM

2. The next cataclysmic extinction may "help"

.. perhaps the ones who survive will thrive on plastics

Plastic is forever

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Response to SoCalDem (Reply #2)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:06 PM

6. No it's not. Only 800 to 2000 years!

You'll never find any plastics in the remains of ancient Mesopotamia!

Oh, wait....

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #6)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:44 PM

17. Bush made sure to ruin Mesopotamia and its relics.

What parts Saddam Hussein didnít poison out of existence.

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #17)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:57 PM

19. Tis true.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #19)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 07:02 PM

29. I watched the televised bombs and cried my paleontology, archaeology,

ancient sociology loving eyes out that night. As far as I'm concerned, civilization died that day.

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #29)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 07:31 PM

33. I feel exacty the same.

I was devestated when I heard IS destroyed Timbuktu and later Palmyra.

Here's a 30min podcast that is poignant and powerful. I definitely lost it the first time I heard it.

TheAncientWorld Efqa

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #33)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 10:31 PM

40. Exactly.

Very cool share. Thanks so much!

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Response to CDerekGo (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:37 PM

11. Good point

I'm with you on the recycling, but I'm starting to think that recycling isn't enough. I'm making an effort to recycle what I can, re-use what I can't recycle, and perhaps more importantly, not using things that will create more trash. It seems that packaging - particularly food packaging is one of the biggest problems.

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Response to leftieNanner (Reply #11)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:41 PM

15. At least many areas are going away from plastic bags. Those and 1 use bottles are the WORST.

And yet people worldwide will keep buying billions of bottles of water even though they live in areas with clean drinking water.

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Response to oldsoftie (Reply #15)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:44 PM

16. My city has banned plastic grocery bags completely

and the stores have to charge ten cents for paper ones. Most people bring their own reusable bags. I'm afraid that I do use the plastic bags in the produce department - but they definitely have an important use in my house. I have a 90 lb. German Shepherd dog and I always "pick up" when we go for a walk.

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Response to leftieNanner (Reply #16)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 07:14 PM

31. Our locality has banned single-use grocery bags, as well.

The first year we had curbside recycling pickup, the planners drastically underestimated enthusiasm and participation and had to jump through hoops to get it all picked up in a reasonable time frame.

The results have been encouraging. Our landfill, for which the region was looking at alternate locations had its use extended by 30-40 years, by early estimates, and that number has kept on growing. With continued improvements and innovation, its life could be indefinite.

The landfill also installed a methane collection system and the whole site is now self-powered. The paper recycling saved enough trees to populate a 100 acre park in its first year.

Now, curbside pickup also includes kitchen scraps of any kind, which are wheeled out to the curb in special "trolleys" and picked up by special trucks.

Metals are not allowed in household or commercial waste, and you can now either dump them for free at recyclers or go through a bit of hassle and get money. I scavenged a house I was demolishing and got $500 in copper and aluminum in half a day.

It's not "everything" but the journey of 1000 miles, and all that.

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Response to BobTheSubgenius (Reply #31)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 08:43 PM

36. Damn, thats an ambitious community!!

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Response to leftieNanner (Reply #11)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:58 PM

20. I wish we could put pressure on

Big corps to use a lot more biodegradable packaging.

There are good choices for milk and eggs. I canít think of much else else. The plastic is going to consume this planet.

Whatís worse, the vast majority of humans donít even care!

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Response to CDerekGo (Reply #1)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:41 PM

27. Well we can't exactly clean it up we can however reduce what we are currently producing.

The pollution that's down there though is just going to have to clean itself up on its own which it will but it will probably take hundreds if not thousands of years but it will eventually happen.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 04:43 PM

3. Frightening

Rec

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Response to malaise (Reply #3)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:02 PM

5. Remember that "kid" who invented the sweeper system to get rid of the plastics in our oceans?

I remember how there were plenty of "experts" at the time who said it was too early to just jump in and start using unproven ideas; we needed to take more time to study the situation. Well, I'd say, after reading this article, that we are about twenty years too late, maybe more!

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:37 PM

10. but the focus needs to be on the source first. 90% of ocean plastic comes from 10 rivers.

All of them are in Africa & Asia.
Capturing the plastic BEFORE it ever gets to the ocean is where the main effort needs to happen. Certainly the ocean cleanup needs to happen too, but its like mopping a floor while a pipe leaks. You gotta fix the pipe.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #5)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:38 PM

12. The tube sweeper broke and was being towed in for repairs

a few weeks ago.

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #12)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 09:21 PM

37. I don't see that as a reason to throw in the towel on the project

I thought they were out for a testing period before the full blown sweep. Working out the kinks. I also remember some statistic about how long it would take for the sweeper to clean up the entire plastic patch, and it was something like 20 years. It was depressing.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Reply #37)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 10:26 PM

39. I think it's just in for repairs.

At least, I hope so. I think they should have several out there working full time. It's understandable that they would break down so there should be back up systems, imo.

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #39)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 10:58 PM

41. Whew! I took your last post to mean we should just give up on the sweeper

Glad to know that's not at all what you meant!

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 04:43 PM

4. Its "Silent Spring" of the deep.

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Response to BSdetect (Reply #4)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:22 PM

25. Sadly, you are so right. I don't know if there is enough international will

to first, STOP dumping your waste in the ocean, and then work on remediating the damage. Some countries have no rules and with the advent of cheap plastic products, it is, and has been a global problem. To see our country pull out of Paris, reduce EPA to a toothless agency and condone fossil fuel and the oil/petro industry in spite of scientifically validated knowledge of the harm these fuels/ products do, is one of many challenges that we face, no matter who is "in power." Rachel Carson would be mad as hell.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:20 PM

7. K&R for exposure

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:23 PM

8. We're doomed,

way past conservation band aids. The key is draconian, global population control followed by a clean up for 100 years.
Since the 60's we've gone from 3.5 Bill people to & 7 BILLION-simply unsustainable, the earth creaking from the strains we're applying to it.

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Response to Pantagruel (Reply #8)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:38 PM

13. So we go to the China "one child" rule?

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Response to oldsoftie (Reply #13)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:49 PM

18. Actually two children works for worldwide population reductions and surprisingly fast n/t.

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Response to airplaneman (Reply #18)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 07:19 PM

32. In the US, most of our population growth lately is coming from immigration

Millennials are too deep in debt to consider children, and those who do have 2 or fewer kids. Also the more educated you are, the later in life you will have children (generally speaking).

Japan is also rapidly losing population due to aging (I read somewhere that in Japan, adult diapers outsell baby diapers). Most of the population growth are in Africa and Asia.

A simple fix to this would be to empower women.

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Response to crazycatlady (Reply #32)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 08:39 PM

35. Yes, lots of folks on the right dont like the fact that our economic growth is tied to immigration.

Without it, we'd be as slow as many other countries.

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Response to crazycatlady (Reply #32)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 11:27 PM

43. I am a crazy cat man

Last edited Sun Mar 3, 2019, 12:38 AM - Edit history (1)

And me and my nine cats love it. Your right on - so nice to hear from some one that gets it.
-Airplane

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Response to airplaneman (Reply #43)

Sun Mar 3, 2019, 09:06 AM

44. see this cat lady has no current cats

I'd love to see pics of your feline family.

I don't have kids either. I'd have to give up my career if I had a family and I'm flat out not willing to do that. My sister's a SAHM who's pregnant with her 3rd child. Every time I see her, she seems desperate for adult interaction.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:36 PM

9. These substances are surgically inserted in to humans every day

in the form of unregulated medical devices. The problem is bigger than we can fathom. And, yes that's a really bad pun.

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #9)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:04 PM

23. What unregulated medical devices?

Pretty sure anything decide a physician would approve of, has been tested for human compatibility ...

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Response to Volaris (Reply #23)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:44 PM

28. You are not correct.

Essure is my best example. Medical devices including hips and knees are not regulated. I have more than five years of research on Essure. It has been a long struggle but as of this year it will be pulled from the market after 10's of thousands of complaints of harm, including still births and deaths. Lawsuits are pending.

https://essureproblems.webs.com/

There is no law protecting you from a toxic implant. None.

Esisters are working on that project for you, too.

http://www.medicaldeviceproblems.com/

You're welcome.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 05:39 PM

14. fucking republicans

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:02 PM

21. to understand

to understand the wide ranging implications of this - for animals and people, I recommend the book Sicker Fatter Poorer by Leonardo Trasande MD trump administration is not going to move on this but we NEED to.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:03 PM

22. Kicked and recommended.




Thanks for the thread ProudLib.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:07 PM

24. Horrifying.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 06:40 PM

26. Humans need to stop using the seas and oceans as a garbage

dump and cesspools. If we completely destroy these water environments our extinction will immediately follow. I personally do not believe humans are capable of saving this planet and ourselves.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 07:14 PM

30. I've been reading about plastic pollution for years

But this is disturbing, although not surprising.
I'm currently in a nursing home, just passed a one year anniversary,(talk about depressing) but this place uses styrofoam cups only once and other types of plastic containers once also.

I've brought in my own reusable cups and anything else I can reuse like salt& pepper shakers, condiment holders etc. Which also means that I buy what goes on them.

I didn't realize how much plastic a place like this throws away and then multiply it by other nursing homes and hospitals within less than 50 miles of me.

I did a rough count with the phone book and STOPPED AT 50!!!

JEEEBUS...we are doomed.

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Response to bearssoapbox (Reply #30)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 08:00 PM

34. Yes, I think we are

But as the ship goes down you will have done everything you can 🙂

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Response to bearssoapbox (Reply #30)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 11:14 PM

42. Compostable and biodegradable cold and hot drink cups are available.

The issue is that they run $0.10-$0.80 per cup, depending on purchase volume. Styrofoam cups run $0.02-$0.04 per cup.

Here is where politics come in. Governments could mandate use of the Biodegradeble or compostable cups and set up a clearing house to save nursing homes money on the purchases, bringing the price closer to the styrofoam price. The problem is the petroleum industry will go nuts and they are better organized and better funded than the green products industry, so petro wins each time and there is unlikely to be any government action to change that.

On the bright side, green products like cups, tableware and plates get better and cheaper to make each year, soon they will be price competitive with plastic and styrofoam without any government intervention.

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Response to ProudLib72 (Original post)

Sat Mar 2, 2019, 09:26 PM

38. Sad!!

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