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Tue May 28, 2019, 04:32 PM

Say Moo: The difference between Welsh/US English and Northern Irish/English

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My daughter also says Brits can't say 'woof' for a dog sound, they say it as 'wiff.'


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Arrow 15 replies Author Time Post
Reply Say Moo: The difference between Welsh/US English and Northern Irish/English (Original post)
TheBlackAdder May 2019 OP
MLAA May 2019 #1
BigmanPigman May 2019 #2
Kaleva May 2019 #3
BigmanPigman May 2019 #4
Kaleva May 2019 #11
PoindexterOglethorpe May 2019 #5
Kaleva May 2019 #10
PoindexterOglethorpe May 2019 #12
Hekate May 2019 #6
muriel_volestrangler May 2019 #7
mitch96 May 2019 #9
muriel_volestrangler May 2019 #13
mitch96 May 2019 #15
Spider Jerusalem May 2019 #14
mitch96 May 2019 #8

Response to TheBlackAdder (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 04:43 PM

1. Too funny!

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Response to TheBlackAdder (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 04:46 PM

2. I could only get about half of what was being said.

The first time I saw A Hard Day's Night I had no idea what the Beatles were saying, and they spoke "English/English".

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #2)

Tue May 28, 2019, 04:50 PM

3. I use close captioning for English movies and TV shows.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #3)

Tue May 28, 2019, 04:58 PM

4. Normally I would say that's funny, but it actually makes sense.

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Response to BigmanPigman (Reply #4)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:44 PM

11. It works well for me. You ought to try it.

Years ago I used to watch many foreign films with English subtitles and it didn't take long for me to get used to reading and still enjoy watching the movie.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #3)

Tue May 28, 2019, 05:06 PM

5. I often find myself turning on closed captioning

for American English also.

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Response to PoindexterOglethorpe (Reply #5)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:42 PM

10. I do that when the wife is upstairs sleeping and I have the volume turned low.

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Response to Kaleva (Reply #10)

Tue May 28, 2019, 09:54 PM

12. Ahh, I'd claim that except I live alone.

But honestly, that's a very good reason to turn them on, and I'm sure your wife is very appreciative.

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Response to TheBlackAdder (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 05:09 PM

6. That's adorable!

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Response to TheBlackAdder (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 05:49 PM

7. I have no idea how any British accent can end up as 'wiff', apart from possibly the Queen

and even she has toned down her weird strangulated accent over the years.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #7)

Tue May 28, 2019, 06:38 PM

9. As in " you wanna go wiff me?"

I've heard that in Brooklyn NY years ago.. Or "Witt" me... Wanna go witt me?
English..... such a strange language..
m

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Response to mitch96 (Reply #9)

Wed May 29, 2019, 04:40 AM

13. The OP said it was for the 'woof' of a dog

"wiff" or "wiv" for "with" I can understand, but not for the dog sound.

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #13)

Wed May 29, 2019, 07:56 AM

15. Woof...

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #7)

Wed May 29, 2019, 04:57 AM

14. there is a fairly distinct difference between US English and British English vowels

mostly because British vowels are more fronted and American vowels are more mid/back (which probably accounts for a difference in perception on the part of Americans).

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Response to TheBlackAdder (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 06:36 PM

8. A great line I heard...

The US and Britain.. Two countries separated by a common language..
I guess it works for other parts of the British Isles as well. I was in Western Ireland, Mayo I think and yes they were speaking English but I had a hard time understanding a word of it...
Oh and forget about the slang.. I loved it...
m

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