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Sun May 17, 2020, 11:22 AM

Is it known whether or not mosquitoes can spread the COVID19 virus?

i.e., by stinging an infected person and then stinging an uninfected person.

9 replies, 784 views

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Arrow 9 replies Author Time Post
Reply Is it known whether or not mosquitoes can spread the COVID19 virus? (Original post)
milestogo May 2020 OP
lapfog_1 May 2020 #1
Tarc May 2020 #2
Igel May 2020 #4
customerserviceguy May 2020 #7
Worried2020 May 2020 #3
Ms. Toad May 2020 #5
Worried2020 May 2020 #8
Ms. Toad May 2020 #9
milestogo May 2020 #6

Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun May 17, 2020, 11:27 AM

1. Unlikely

this virus has specialized receptor proteins the match the cells in your lungs... sort of like a key to a lock.

It wants to infect your lungs via transmission in the air or by you touching something with the virus and then touching your mouth or nose.

Could it spread via blood contact... possibly.

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun May 17, 2020, 11:29 AM

2. It is not a bloodborne disease, nor do mosquitoes "sting"

So much disinformation...

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Response to Tarc (Reply #2)

Sun May 17, 2020, 11:52 AM

4. I'm going to say that there's a better answer.

I wouldn't want a transfusion from somebody infected with this bug.

The people who show heart valve damage or get diarrhea because their GI tract is ravaged by the virus didn't have their hearts or GI tract exposed to air-borne droplets contain SARS-CoV-2 virions. Once a cell produces the virus and is lysed, the virus can travel in the bloodstream. It must in order to produce the effects we see.

It's not blood borne because we're not around others' blood all that much. I'd suspect it could be blood borne. I'd hope that they checked the blood supply for blood drawn in January-March.


That gets back to the OP's question, which doesn't just involve stinging but the blood meal that female mosquitoes need.

I think the answer is almost certainly that mosquitoes can't pass the virus. The mosquito may bite different people to top off her tank with blood, injecting an anticoagulant each time, but the virus won't infect the mosquito and I don't see why it would travel from stomach to whatever organ produces the anticoagulant and show up in that fluid. It's not like she injects the blood from the first "donor".

And in any event it would be a small amount--the blood won't have that high a concentration, and if some stray virion manages to get across the stomach barrier into that fluid it's not enough to produce an infection.

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Response to Igel (Reply #4)

Sun May 17, 2020, 02:32 PM

7. That all sounds comforting, but

What is the difference between C-19 and the viruses that we know can be transmitted by mosquitoes, such as West Nile and Zika?

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Response to milestogo (Original post)

Sun May 17, 2020, 11:44 AM

3. Yes it is, and No it cannot

.
.

""The good news is the COVID-19 virus can't be transmitted through any of the vector pests, which is good news for us. The mosquito and the tick are both known worldwide for being able to transmit a wide variety of really bad, deadly viruses and diseases. Thank goodness COVID-19 is not one of them," Fowler emphasized.

The CDC agrees. On the CDC website, under "commonly-asked questions," the CDC explains it has no data to suggest this new coronavirus or similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks. The main way COVID-19 spreads is from person to person."

MORE at link

https://www.wfmynews2.com/article/news/local/2-wants-to-know/mosquitoes-ticks-covid19-coronavirus-transmission-spread-infected-wfmy/83-56f59131-1235-4e97-90f9-e88d3b8746c6

W

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Response to Worried2020 (Reply #3)

Sun May 17, 2020, 12:00 PM

5. However - you may recall that initially prominent health organizations also said

there was no data to suggest is was spread from person to person, either.

"No data to suggest," is not the same as "it cannot."

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Response to Ms. Toad (Reply #5)

Sun May 17, 2020, 02:58 PM

8. Article is from 10 days ago - "Published: 6:15 AM EDT May 7, 2020"

.
.

Not sure if you looked at the article or not . . . .

"initially" was a few months back. We've done tons of research, recording and analyzing the data ever since.

We might be learning something . . .



W

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Response to Worried2020 (Reply #8)

Sun May 17, 2020, 03:25 PM

9. What I was pointing out was the subtle language distinction they use

when they are discussing hypotheses versus relatively solid science-based conclusion.

When they don't know yet - because they are being asked to hypothesize on an issue for which there is not data-based relative certainty, they say (as you did quoting the article) "there is no data to suggest. . . "

As in these previous hypotheses:

There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection. WHO

WHO: There is currently no evidence that wearing a mask (whether medical or other types) by healthy persons in the wider community setting, including universal community masking, can prevent them from infection with respiratory viruses, including COVID-19.

On January 14, the World Health Organization (WHO) tweeted that there was "no clear evidence" that the coronavirus could spread between people.


The assertion (which you are reporting as certainty "It cannot" ) is phrased in the manner they phrase things they are not yet certain of ("the CDC explains it has no data to suggest this new coronavirus or similar coronaviruses are spread by mosquitoes or ticks" ).

So - yes, we can (and have) learned many things - such as that each and every one of those hypotheses turned out to be false. But apparently one of the things not yet learned is how to read weasel words. Until there is data, it is just a hypothesis (not a certainty, or even a probability) - and the CDC/WHO will phrase its statements cautiously so that if/when it is proven wrong they can point to the hypothetical phrasing.

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Response to Worried2020 (Reply #3)

Sun May 17, 2020, 12:04 PM

6. Thank you. That's good news.

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