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Thu Dec 15, 2011, 08:44 AM

JSF - What's Really Happening

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JSF - What's Really Happening
Posted by Bill Sweetman at 12/13/2011 7:00 AM CST

When the Joint Strike Fighter team told Guy Norris about the jet's first run to its Mach 1.6 design speed, a couple of minor facts slipped their minds. Nobody remembered that the jet had landed (from either that sortie or another run to Mach 1.6) with "peeling and bubbling" of coatings on the horizontal tails and damage to engine thermal panels. Or that the entire test force was subsequently limited to Mach 1.0.

But selective amnesia is not even one of five "major consequence" problems that have already surfaced with the JSF and are disclosed by a top-level Pentagon review obtained by Ares. Those issues affect flight safety, the basic cockpit design, the carrier suitability of the F-35C and other aspects of the program have been identified, and no fixes have been demonstrated yet. Three more "major consequence" problems are "likely" to emerge during tests, including high buffet loads and airframe fatigue.

Experience from flight testing has eviscerated the argument that the F-35 program architects used to support high concurrency, with fat production contracts early in the test program: that modeling and simulation had advanced to the point where problems would be designed out of the hardware. In fact, the F-35 is having just as many problems as earlier programs, which means that there is no reason to expect that it will not continue to do so.

The "quick look review" (QLR) panel was chartered by acting Pentagon acquisition boss Frank Kendall on Oct. 28, eight days after top U.S. Air Force, Navy and U.K. Royal Air Force operational test force commanders jointly expressed their concern that the F-35 would not be ready to start initial operational testing in 2015, as envisaged in the delayed test program adopted in January.

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Reply JSF - What's Really Happening (Original post)
unhappycamper Dec 2011 OP
tech3149 Dec 2011 #1
bemildred Dec 2011 #2

Response to unhappycamper (Original post)

Thu Dec 15, 2011, 11:38 AM

1. I think I've mentioned this before

The F-35 and F-22 are both turkeys. Too much technology not enough sound science in the design. It follows an article I read from a long time procurement officer. We haven't gotten our monies worth on any weapons system since the 50's. It's time for the grunts to start running procurement to get what they really need.

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Response to unhappycamper (Original post)

Thu Dec 15, 2011, 11:47 AM

2. Business as usual in the DOD. nt

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