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d_r

(6,907 posts)
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 07:18 PM Apr 2013

Is "figures" actually a word?

Not like "action figures" or "charts and figures" but like "he figures."

Is it really a word?

Read this "news story"

http://www.wrcbtv.com/story/21974771/north-ga-child-finds-skull-in-yard-possibly-human

===========


"Them little eyes, they don't miss nothing," Jeff Stevens said.

An experienced hunter, Jeff Stevens didn't figure this skull could belong to any animal.

"About this big and about 3/8 thick on the skull part. I've killed a little bit of everything there is and there ain't no skull I've ever seen that looked like that except a human just in seeing pictures and stuff," he said.

He said their dog, Annie, is always dragging stuff up into the yard from the woods and figures that's how it ended up just feet away from their home.

37 replies = new reply since forum marked as read
Highlight: NoneDon't highlight anything 5 newestHighlight 5 most recent replies
Is "figures" actually a word? (Original Post) d_r Apr 2013 OP
Yes; as such, its a legitimate verb: elleng Apr 2013 #1
yes. eom planetc Apr 2013 #2
Is Google broken? WinkyDink Apr 2013 #3
I tried googling it d_r Apr 2013 #10
Yes, it can be a verb. TimberValley Apr 2013 #4
from dictionary.com BainsBane Apr 2013 #5
OK, so d_r Apr 2013 #11
it derives from 23 BainsBane Apr 2013 #19
OK thanks d_r Apr 2013 #36
It figures you'd ask... nt cbrer Apr 2013 #6
lol pinboy3niner Apr 2013 #12
LOL AsahinaKimi Apr 2013 #32
It figures that someone would post this pinboy3niner Apr 2013 #7
I reckon it is. cthulu2016 Apr 2013 #8
Yes, it is used as a synonym for think, believe or imagine. PoliticAverse Apr 2013 #9
Past paticiple of to figure Drew Richards Apr 2013 #13
It's a common term used at beauty contests. randome Apr 2013 #14
Yep. Go figure.... Isoldeblue Apr 2013 #15
Is "dictionary" obsolete? MineralMan Apr 2013 #16
Are articles obsolete? You're missing a "the". n/t DisgustipatedinCA Apr 2013 #17
No. I just did not put dictionary between MineralMan Apr 2013 #18
I didn't feel poorly before now DisgustipatedinCA Apr 2013 #20
Thank you for your kind advice. MineralMan Apr 2013 #21
Focus on the "in fun" part. That was the operative phrase. DisgustipatedinCA Apr 2013 #22
I focus on whatever seems to me to be in focus. MineralMan Apr 2013 #24
You're way too oversensitive. Do what you need to do, but you've made a mountain out of nothing DisgustipatedinCA Apr 2013 #27
I reckon. FSogol Apr 2013 #23
By my calculation, I think you have the right idea. MineralMan Apr 2013 #25
Figures. n/t FSogol Apr 2013 #26
I expect it is. I'm fixing to find out. nolabear Apr 2013 #28
Thank you everyone who replied d_r Apr 2013 #29
It may not be what you intended, but your post raising the issue came across as a condescending onenote Apr 2013 #33
I know what the word means d_r Apr 2013 #34
oh you mean the reporter that wrote the article d_r Apr 2013 #35
... Spider Jerusalem Apr 2013 #30
"Thou art alwayes figuring diseases in me" muriel_volestrangler Apr 2013 #31
Itz a figurez of speech! Quantess Apr 2013 #37

elleng

(133,076 posts)
1. Yes; as such, its a legitimate verb:
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 07:22 PM
Apr 2013

to come to a judgment about after discussion or consideration <we figured that we had better arrive early at the concert in order to get good seats>
Synonyms choose, conclude, determine, figure, name, opt, resolve, settle (on or upon)

BainsBane

(53,288 posts)
5. from dictionary.com
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 07:24 PM
Apr 2013

fig·ure [fig-yer; especially British fig-er] Show IPA noun, verb, fig·ured, fig·ur·ing.
noun
1.a numerical symbol, especially an Arabic numeral.
2.an amount or value expressed in numbers.
3.figures, the use of numbers in calculating; arithmetic: to be poor at figures.
4.a written symbol other than a letter.
5.form or shape, as determined by outlines or exterior surfaces: to be round, square, or cubical in figure.
Relevant Questions
How To Figure?
How Much Is Six Figures?
How To Figure Square Yar...
How To Figure Linear Fee...

verb (used with object)
23.to compute or calculate (often followed by up ): to figure up a total.
24.to express in figures.
25.to mark or adorn with a design or pattern.
26.to portray by speech or action.
27.to represent or express by a figure of speech.

d_r

(6,907 posts)
11. OK, so
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 07:41 PM
Apr 2013

verb (used with object)
23.to compute or calculate (often followed by up ): to figure up a total.
24.to express in figures.
25.to mark or adorn with a design or pattern.
26.to portray by speech or action.
27.to represent or express by a figure of speech.

----------------
I don't see it. It isn't the first one. It isn't the second. It isn't the third. It isn't the fourth or fifth. Or am I just missing it?

d_r

(6,907 posts)
36. OK thanks
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 05:45 PM
Apr 2013

I wasn't sure the way it was written if that "calculate" had to be about math or numbers - "figures." It can be applied more broadly like "figuring something out." Thanks.

PoliticAverse

(26,366 posts)
9. Yes, it is used as a synonym for think, believe or imagine.
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 07:32 PM
Apr 2013

www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/figure?showCookiePolicy=true

I most often hear it used as "I figure" instead of "I think" or "I believe".

"I figure Obama will defeat Romney".

And just as you would say someone else 'thinks' or 'believes' you would say someone else 'figures'.

I think the use of 'figure' in this manner is much more common in certain parts of the U.S. than others.






MineralMan

(146,533 posts)
18. No. I just did not put dictionary between
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 08:38 PM
Apr 2013

quotation marks. Figure means the same as reckon. Both mean to calculate. Both are used the same way, colloquially. English is a rich language.

ETA: I added the punctuation. Feel better now?

 

DisgustipatedinCA

(12,530 posts)
20. I didn't feel poorly before now
Tue Apr 16, 2013, 08:56 PM
Apr 2013

You shouldn't try to squelch threads like this--you should embrace them. They give you a chance to go all pedantic on someone's ass.

This one was all in fun, MM. Really.

MineralMan

(146,533 posts)
21. Thank you for your kind advice.
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 09:31 AM
Apr 2013

It's interesting that the only post you made in this thread was to criticize me. Seeya.

MineralMan

(146,533 posts)
24. I focus on whatever seems to me to be in focus.
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 09:39 AM
Apr 2013

That's my modus operandi. Yours might differ from mine. What was in focus for me is that you did not enter the thread, except to comment on my post. With that in mind, I will not reply to any further posts in this subthread.

 

DisgustipatedinCA

(12,530 posts)
27. You're way too oversensitive. Do what you need to do, but you've made a mountain out of nothing
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 09:46 AM
Apr 2013

You'll know when I'm being serious.

d_r

(6,907 posts)
29. Thank you everyone who replied
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 03:30 PM
Apr 2013

I asked because the dictionary definition wasn't clear to me. It says to "calculate" but I wasn't sure if this usage of the word was over shooting that. Google didn't help because the word is used in different ways and there wasn't a clear way to search for it.

I wondered if the use of the word was colloquial. I am from this area, so I wanted to hear from people outside this area.

It seems like it is considered an appropriate use of the word.

Thank you again.

onenote

(43,395 posts)
33. It may not be what you intended, but your post raising the issue came across as a condescending
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 04:42 PM
Apr 2013

swipe at the speaker in the statement you quoted, not as a sincere question about the meaning of the word.

d_r

(6,907 posts)
34. I know what the word means
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 05:40 PM
Apr 2013

I am from here. I am not sure if it is really a word, I wondered if it was a word in other parts of the country. I understand the way it was meant, I've said it and I've said "I reckon" but I've been told that reckon isn't really a word it is colloquial. I don't know the speaker in the statement I quoted, it is from the newspaper.

d_r

(6,907 posts)
35. oh you mean the reporter that wrote the article
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 05:42 PM
Apr 2013

that I was taking a swipe at them. I understand now. It did stand out to me that it was written in a colloquial way but I wasn't trying to be mean to the author.

 

Spider Jerusalem

(21,786 posts)
30. ...
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 03:36 PM
Apr 2013
from "figure" - in colloquial phrase it (or that) figures, it is reasonable, likely, or understandable; it makes sense (orig. and chiefly U.S.).

to figure out: To work out (a sum) by means of figures; more widely, to estimate or calculate; hence, to work out, make out. Chiefly U.S.

muriel_volestrangler

(101,759 posts)
31. "Thou art alwayes figuring diseases in me"
Wed Apr 17, 2013, 04:36 PM
Apr 2013

Shakespeare (Measure for Measure)

That's the first use in that sense in the Oxford English Dictionary.

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