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Fri Jan 31, 2014, 11:41 PM

 

Dying young: Americans less likely to make it to 50

A report released on Jan. 9 by the National Academies paints a dire picture of American health.

Not only do people in the United States die sooner than people in other high-income countries, but American health is poorer than in peer countries at every stage of life — from birth to childhood to adolescence, in youth and middle age, and for older adults.

“The problem is not limited to people who are poor or uninsured,” said Eileen Crimmins, holder of the AARP Chair in Gerontology at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and a member of the National Research Council panel that compiled the report. “Even Americans with health insurance, higher incomes, college education and healthy behaviors, such as not smoking, seem to be sicker than their counterparts in other countries.”

Deaths before 50 account for about two-thirds of the difference in male life expectancy between the United States and other developed countries and about one-third of the difference in female life expectancy, the report found.

Among the 17 peer countries examined by the panel — all high-income democracies with relatively large populations — people in the United States are much more likely to die of almost everything, including injury, noncommunicable diseases, such as diabetes, and communicable diseases, such as HIV.

In its report, the expert panel identified several likely explanations for the lack of healthiness of Americans, including high levels of poverty in the United States and a built environment that is designed around automobiles. In addition, while Americans are currently less likely to smoke and drink less, we consume the most calories per person and have higher rates of drug abuse, the report found.

http://news.usc.edu/45586/dying-young-americans-less-likely-to-make-it-to-50/


Americans smoke & drink less than peers in developed countries, but die younger. Even well-off people die younger than their well-off counterparts in other countries.

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Reply Dying young: Americans less likely to make it to 50 (Original post)
El_Johns Jan 2014 OP
democratisphere Feb 2014 #1
Warpy Feb 2014 #4
El_Johns Feb 2014 #8
democratisphere Feb 2014 #34
WhiteTara Feb 2014 #2
Htom Sirveaux Feb 2014 #3
Marr Feb 2014 #5
BrotherIvan Feb 2014 #6
Bluenorthwest Feb 2014 #31
El_Johns Feb 2014 #33
BrotherIvan Feb 2014 #43
woo me with science Feb 2014 #28
loudsue Feb 2014 #7
johnnyreb Feb 2014 #9
cui bono Feb 2014 #10
El_Johns Feb 2014 #15
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2014 #11
El_Johns Feb 2014 #12
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2014 #13
El_Johns Feb 2014 #14
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2014 #20
El_Johns Feb 2014 #23
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2014 #24
illachick Feb 2014 #16
Recursion Feb 2014 #17
El_Johns Feb 2014 #18
BlancheSplanchnik Feb 2014 #21
Bluenorthwest Feb 2014 #32
Recursion Feb 2014 #36
Bluenorthwest Feb 2014 #38
cherokeeprogressive Feb 2014 #19
Not a Fan Feb 2014 #22
Solly Mack Feb 2014 #25
Ecumenist Feb 2014 #29
Solly Mack Feb 2014 #39
KT2000 Feb 2014 #26
marions ghost Feb 2014 #41
newfie11 Feb 2014 #27
sorefeet Feb 2014 #30
kydo Feb 2014 #35
Recursion Feb 2014 #37
FarCenter Feb 2014 #40
woo me with science Feb 2014 #42

Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 12:03 AM

1. How is this possible in the Country with the most expensive health care in the UNIVERSE?

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Response to democratisphere (Reply #1)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 12:37 AM

4. They know how to charge for it. What they don't know

is how to distribute the burden fairly. This country still considers illness a consumer decision. If you're poor, you avoid treatment as long as you can possibly function. Then you go to an ER and chances are very good it's too late.

I've seen people die from a lot of things that could have been treated--and completely cured--months or even weeks or days earlier.

We have absolutely the worst health care distribution system on the whole planet. While poorer countries have less of what we have, they honestly do a better job of distributing what little they have.

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Response to Warpy (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:27 AM

8. They know how; they choose not to.

 

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Response to Warpy (Reply #4)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:52 AM

34. 100% Agree with you Warpy.

Perhaps if the health care providers were more concerned with DELIVERING affordable, quality health care for all, instead of providing over the top buildings and facilities that emulate 5 Star Hotels with valet parking, people wouldn't be dying prematurely. The biggest problem with health care in the US is the exorbitant cost and NOTHING is being done to curb or control it. Health care is a totally corrupt business.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 12:18 AM

2. Stress?

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 12:26 AM

3. It could be decreasing strength of community.

We are a social species after all, despite all the conservative faith in hyper-individualism.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 12:49 AM

5. It's because our whole society is designed primarily to make money for wealthy people.

 

Healthcare is just another commodity, parceled out by big business. They're allowed to market extremely unhealthy food to children, and everything, from portion sizes to food selection, is defined by profit margin.

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Response to Marr (Reply #5)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:22 AM

6. In my experience, this is true

I just came back from visiting relatives in Denmark and was not surprised to see everyone walking and really focusing on their health. It's a sign of good education to care about one's health where here we focus on possessions (plus everything is very expensive there, so over-consumption is limited somewhat).

And though their food is very rich, with full cream, butter, cheese, meat and fish, some vegetables--but it is winter there so it is more pickles or red cabbage or potatoes--I did not see was a single obese person. Also, speaking to older people, they were mostly disease and medication-free and all had some sort of hobby that kept them moving and active. And that awful universal healthcare whenever they need it!

They also don't believe in working oneself to death and there is still a sense of a worker's dignity with paid family leave and vacation time that would make your jaw drop. Lower stress and a sense of deserving a human standard of living. Were they happier than many people I know here? Yes.

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Response to BrotherIvan (Reply #6)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:40 AM

31. And yet Denmark is virtually equal to the US in the overall chart and comes in second

 

on cardiovascular deaths.
If you look at the charts at the link, it is very clear that it is all about the violence here, the only notable difference is in the violent death category. Much more of that in the US. The US not the number one nation for deaths from any communicable disease, not one.
Look at what the link actually says.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #31)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:50 AM

33. It's 2nd-to-last for non-communicable disease, last for injuries, last for pregnancy-related deaths,

 

2nd-to last for infectious & parasitic duseases.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #31)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:07 PM

43. Thank you for pointing that out

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Response to Marr (Reply #5)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 06:42 AM

28. +10000

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:25 AM

7. And guess who is to blame? The people who enable corporations... insurance companies

who have fucked up our medical system so bad until it is in tatters. Pharmaceutical companies. Corporations who have fought and bought politicians so that not one penny of profit would get taken away from their bottom line, in order to provide a better world.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:33 AM

10. I think processed foods play a large part. And fast food.

The American diet is terrible. No emphasis on veggies and that food pyramid isn't healthy.

There was a thread a while back with pics of people in various countries and their week's worth of groceries. The Americans had all kinds of processed and branded foods. And with those comes a lot of sugar and HFCS. Yuck. I don't see vegetables in that pic.

Found the site with the story:
http://fstoppers.com/what-a-week-of-groceries-looks-like-around-the-world

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Response to cui bono (Reply #10)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:20 AM

15. “Even Americans with health insurance, higher incomes, college education and healthy behaviors"

 

“The problem is not limited to people who are poor or uninsured,” said Eileen Crimmins, holder of the AARP Chair in Gerontology at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and a member of the National Research Council panel that compiled the report. “Even Americans with health insurance, higher incomes, college education and healthy behaviors, such as not smoking, seem to be sicker than their counterparts in other countries.”

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:59 AM

11. kick and reccing every post here too.

I think the stress of a culture of overwork, long hours and underpay is a huge factor.

I'd sure like to see further breakdown of the info....demographics would be very interesting. I'd be curious to see where people grew up or lived at the longest, and if there's a correlation (nearby chemical plants? Industrial? Factory farming? Etc.)

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Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #11)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:07 AM

12. Every segment of the US population lives shorter lives than their peers in other developed

 

countries, so it doesn't appear that there's a correlation with chemical plants or factory farming particularly.

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Response to El_Johns (Reply #12)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:15 AM

13. hmmm....ok thanks.

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Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #13)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:19 AM

14. Key paragraph:

 

“The problem is not limited to people who are poor or uninsured,” said Eileen Crimmins, holder of the AARP Chair in Gerontology at the USC Davis School of Gerontology and a member of the National Research Council panel that compiled the report. “Even Americans with health insurance, higher incomes, college education and healthy behaviors, such as not smoking, seem to be sicker than their counterparts in other countries.”


Upper income, well educated americans tend not to live near chemical plants, etc.

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Response to El_Johns (Reply #14)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:40 AM

20. quite true.....

But i wonder where they grew up? Could that be an influence?

I grew up in an affluent atea of NJ...back then, the "Jersey Meadows" was an industrial swamp of chemical companies, flaming off-gas chimneys and nasty discolored holding pools. The smell was awful, and depening on the wind, you could smell it from miles away.

Anyway, it's hard to narrow it down.
But i have read that Americans have far less vacation and relaxation time than people in other countries. Much more stressful.

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Response to BlancheSplanchnik (Reply #20)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:43 AM

23. Europe & Japan have chemical plants too, likely just as many per capita, in a generally more

 

crowded landmass.

I think you're closer to the mark in the last paragraph.

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Response to El_Johns (Reply #23)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:47 AM

24. hmmm...good comparison. makes sense.

We know stress ravages health.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:34 AM

16. Trying to think of the best thing to blame for these statistics...

Should I go with politics or social and cultural issues or is it a little bit everything?

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:36 AM

17. The spirit level

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Response to Recursion (Reply #17)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:37 AM

18. +1

 

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Response to Recursion (Reply #17)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:40 AM

21. hmmmm.....

That makes sense.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #17)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:43 AM

32. If you look at the charts at the USC link, it is the violence in our society that accounts for

 

this, the US and Denmark are neck in neck for 'over all deaths per 100K' and the US leads all nations in death only from on category, intentional violence. The US does not top the chart on deaths from even one communicable disease. Not one. But the violence chart is off the meter for the US compared to the rest.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #32)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 10:09 AM

36. is suicide counted as intentional violence?

I know our suicide rate is appallingly high, and this also accounts for a super majority of gun deaths.

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Response to Recursion (Reply #36)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 10:27 AM

38. I would assume so, as it is intentional and violent. I'm saying look at the actual information

 

at the link, skip the OP's narrative which is inaccurate, and you will find that the only major difference between the US and the others is violence. Guns. Go check out the study itself, you have the skills to make sense of it, probably better than my own. Example, the 'over all death per 100k' in the US is nearly identical to the rate in Denmark, the US does not lead in deaths by specific diseases, nor in any other category. Violence, we are far, far in the lead. Among those mostly European nations.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:38 AM

19. I'm in the bonus.

 

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:41 AM

22. Mortality

Because vitamin D is so cheap and so clearly reduces all-cause mortality, I can say this with great certainty: Vitamin D represents the single most cost-effective medical intervention in the United States. ~ Dr. Greg Plotnikoff, Medical Director, Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis.


"This is like the Holy Grail of cancer medicine; vitamin D produced a drop in cancer rates greater than that for quitting smoking, or indeed any other countermeasure in existence. ~ Dennis Mangan, clinical laboratory scientist.


No other method to prevent cancer has been identified that has such a powerful impact. ~ Dr. Cedric Garland, Vitamin D expert.


I would challenge anyone to find an area or nutrient or any factor that has such consistent anti-cancer benefits as vitamin D.
The data are really quite remarkable. ~ Dr. Edward Giovannucci, Vitamin D expert.


Our most important hormones depend upon adequate reserves of cholesterol for their production and nowhere is this more important than as the precursor substance for the synthesis of Vitamin D, known also as calcitriol. Researchers in this field are sufficiently concerned from the results of their studies to pronounce that we are in the midst of an epidemic of vitamin D deficiency of immense proportion. ~ Duane Graveline MD MPH, former NASA Astronaut, former USAF flight surgeon, and retired family doctor.


The problem is that vitamin D is not really a vitamin, it's a hormone. If your thyroid hormone level was low, you'd gain 20, 30, or more pounds in weight, your blood pressure would skyrocket, you'd lose your hair, become constipated, develop blood clots, be terribly fatigued. In other words, you'd suffer profound changes. Likewise, if thyroid hormone levels are corrected by giving you thyroid hormone, you'd experience profound correction of these phenomena. That's what I'm seeing with vitamin D: restoration of this hormone to normal blood levels (25-OH-vitamin D3 50 ng/mL) yields profound changes in the body. ~ Dr. William Davis, cardiologist.


Vitamin D is cholecalciferol, a hormone. Deficiencies of hormones can have catastrophic consequences. ~ Dr. William Davis, cardiologist.


In terms of getting more bang for your health care buck, Vitamin D testing and supplementation for the population is one solution which is guaranteed to improve overall health of the population at a ridiculously low cost. ~ Jeffrey Dach MD


The danger of too much sun is minimal — the danger of too little sun is enormous. ~ Dr. Michael R. Eades.


If you think of it evolutionarily, it's the oldest hormone on this Earth. I don't think that this is going to be a flash in the pan. ~ Dr. Michael F. Holick, Vitamin D expert.


The Vitamin D Council for more information:
http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 02:51 AM

25. And on the eve of my 50th B-day...I had to see and read this.

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Response to Solly Mack (Reply #25)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 08:45 AM

29. OMG!! Well, Happy Birthday, Solly Mack. I turned 50 on the 30th and going on 3 years

as a survivor of stage 4 cervical cancer.

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Response to Ecumenist (Reply #29)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 11:32 AM

39. and to you, Ecumenist! Congrats and Happy Birthday! That's wonderful news!

Here's to 50 more great years for the both of us!

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 03:08 AM

26. our homes!

Everything from laundry detergent, air fresheners, personal care products, cleaning products - are a constant assault on the system. Many of these items are not accepted in European countries because of some chemicals used. Manufacturers remove the offensive chemicals for sales in Europe.

Homes are being built with more and more synthetic materials - formaldehyde is in a lot of the building materials. Homes are sealed up tight now and we are breathing a chemical soup that has never been tested for safety.

It's not working out very well.

Genetics loads the gun, environment pulls the trigger.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #26)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:05 PM

41. Agree. I think chemical exposure is

a greater factor than most people realize.

Previous generations did not grow up with this crap in everything.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 06:17 AM

27. Look at the processed food in this country

It's changing now but for the most part food in Europe was real, real cream, real butter, etc.
No additives added to it meanwhile we've been fed food loaded with chemicals.
Beef, chicken fed chemicals, it's in the food chain!

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:36 AM

30. There might be something to the

vitamin D thing. I feel so much better in the summer. The winter, I feel like I been hit by a bus most days.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 09:55 AM

35. and then there is violence like ....

gun violence. I'm sure that doesn't help.

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Response to kydo (Reply #35)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 10:14 AM

37. Our gun death rate is appallingly high

And it's about 70% suicides. Some anti gun control people throw that out to get to shut down control discussions, but it's how most people killed by a gun die and we need to figure out something to do about that.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 11:57 AM

40. It is due to air conditioning

 

People stay indoors in their air conditioned houses, offices, stores, etc. When they go outside, the get in their air conditioned cars.

Plus, it consumes a lot of energy to generate sweat and cool yourself. So the combination of sedentary life style and the reduced metabolism makes people fat.

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Response to El_Johns (Original post)

Sat Feb 1, 2014, 01:52 PM

42. kick

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