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Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:13 PM

 

Why no Native Americans in prominent positions?

In Media, government, etc.

MSNBC, DLC, White House

???????????

22 replies, 2744 views

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Arrow 22 replies Author Time Post
Reply Why no Native Americans in prominent positions? (Original post)
TshaiRedhair Nov 2014 OP
uppityperson Nov 2014 #1
TshaiRedhair Nov 2014 #2
1StrongBlackMan Nov 2014 #4
uppityperson Nov 2014 #5
Algernon Moncrieff Nov 2014 #3
YarnAddict Nov 2014 #6
hack89 Nov 2014 #10
Algernon Moncrieff Nov 2014 #12
Downwinder Nov 2014 #7
tritsofme Nov 2014 #8
Barack_America Nov 2014 #9
nilesobek Nov 2014 #11
raging moderate Nov 2014 #13
SheilaT Nov 2014 #14
Downwinder Nov 2014 #15
SheilaT Nov 2014 #18
KT2000 Nov 2014 #16
hunter Nov 2014 #19
KT2000 Nov 2014 #21
JI7 Nov 2014 #17
Jenoch Nov 2014 #20
Xithras Nov 2014 #22

Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:16 PM

1. Why do you think so? A quick search shows me this link, need to look through it but wanted to share.

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Response to uppityperson (Reply #1)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:19 PM

2. "Prominent"? No

 

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Reply #2)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:27 PM

5. Why do you think not?

I notice you asking questions but not offering an opinion on those questions. Why are there not?

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:24 PM

3. If I were a betting man...

I'd bet that a man named Lance Morgan will emerge into a position of public prominence in he next decade.

http://www.hochunkinc.com/management.html#!

http://www.hochunkinc.com/index.html

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:31 PM

6. What about Senator Warren? n/t

 

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Response to YarnAddict (Reply #6)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:52 PM

10. Let's not open that can of worms again. Nt

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Response to hack89 (Reply #10)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 12:18 AM

12. I say we open it!

Elizabeth Warren Avoids American Indian Media


WASHINGTON – As the controversy continues to swirl around U.S. Senate candidate Elizabeth Warren’s self-reported Cherokee ancestry, she has dodged several interview requests from the Native American press.

A spokesman for the Warren campaign, Alethea Harney, said by telephone on May 15 that Warren would not do an interview with Indian Country Today Media Network at that time, but “want[ed] to keep the lines of communication open.”

ICTMN had by that point requested multiple interviews with Warren in order for her to clarify her statements on her ancestry, to explain how she highlighted that self-reported ancestry while working in academia, as well as to examine the fall-out that has occurred in Indian country regarding identity issues as her campaign fiasco has stayed in the news.

In the meantime, throughout the month of May, Warren continued to do interviews with the mainstream and local press, including national appearances on MSNBC.

On May 25, after several more requests from ICTMN, Harney responded by e-mail, “Thanks for your request(s)! I will keep you posted. Thanks for understanding. Have a wonderful weekend.”



Read more at http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2012/05/31/elizabeth-warren-avoids-american-indian-media-115802

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:34 PM

7. Brad Carson, Ben Campbell?

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:40 PM

8. Ben Nighthorse Campbell was involved in national politics for a long time.

As a congressman and senator from Colorado.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Wed Nov 12, 2014, 11:46 PM

9. Welcome to DU.

This seems to be an important issue for you. I see you have scattered this question in a few threads.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 12:05 AM

11. My opinion?

Its straight up racism. The powers that own the media don't want Native Americans to have a voice because it doesn't fit their agenda, and, powerful Native American voices in influential places would expose one of the greatest crimes ever committed in the history of the entire world.

You mention more than just media, I know, but being influential comes with media coverage. How could they justify what they are doing overseas when powerful and influential Native Americans challenging policies similar to the ones used against them?

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 12:20 AM

13. We must work to change that.

We need many Native Americans in lower offices, then in higher offices. Eventually, there will be a Native American President of the United States. We must not let go of that hope. The just must live by faith, and faith is the substance of what you are hoping for. As Gandhi said, Be the change you want to see.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 12:56 AM

14. In my very humble opinion it's because Native Americans

 

spend almost all of their lives outside of the mainstream. They live apart, usually, from the mainstream culture. Their schools are crap, often by deliberate policy.

I also suspect that many of them simply don't want to interact with the white man's world. Not all of them, of course.

For what it's worth, here in New Mexico, our failed Democratic ticket for governor included a Native American woman in the lt. governor's slot, Deb Haaland. I actually got to meet her at a wonderful candidate meet and greet. I think if she could have found the money to campaign more or less on her own, it might have led to more votes for the Democratic governor/lt governor slate.

This is actually a state with a very strong Native American presence. Even so, most of them are outside what I'll call the mainstream. They don't seem to wind up as doctors, lawyers, school teachers, or anything else that truly impacts anyone. I'm sure most of that is because of the residual racism from when white people (in this case the Spaniards) first invaded and conquered. We've relegated Native Americans to marginal positions in many ways. And yet, a lot of them truly want to maintain and sustain their culture. A couple of years ago I had the privilege and joy of watching some women from I can't recall which Native American tribe perform traditional dances at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center in Albuquerque (a fantastic place you must visit if you get anywhere near this state) and it was clear that maintaining their culture was hugely important to these women. After the dances, I got to speak with them, and they assured me that yes, the younger women in their tribe were learning these dances and would preserve them.

So there's an inherent conflict between maintaining a culture that is very different from what we consider to be the mainstream, and joining that mainstream to the point of participating in its power elite. To assimilate or to maintain the heritage? There is no easy answer. I'm not Native American myself, so anything I might say on this needs to be understood to be of limited value.

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Response to SheilaT (Reply #14)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 01:36 AM

15. Yet Carlos Montezuma/Wassaja became an M.D. in 1889.

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Response to Downwinder (Reply #15)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 02:04 PM

18. At the age of five he was adopted

 

by a white man from Naples, Italy, who now lived in this country. Totally different circumstances from the majority of Native Americans here.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 03:40 AM

16. as far as politics -

tribes are sovereign and hold a certain amount of power apart from the US and state governments. I don't think all tribes exercise that power but the ones that have coveted natural resources, historical hunting, fishing, and sacred lands do - but as the tribe.
They have their own political structure.

We did once have a Makah tribal member serve as the ombudsman of the EPA. He was great! After 9/11 he came out in support of protecting the people of NY from the pollution in spite of Christine Whitman's proclamation that everything was safe. They tried to get rid of him and seize his files. He slept in his office to protect the files. They were eventually successful in getting him out - he stood on principle as few would have.

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Response to KT2000 (Reply #16)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 02:58 PM

19. This is true, and it also makes "conservatives" hostile toward them.

Even in small ways.

My niece and my kid's SO have tribal affiliations and haven't had to pay for fishing licenses, with certain limitations mostly related to $ income.

This makes the same people who froth at the mouth about affirmative action for black people spew the same old "reverse racism" crap.

"It's not fair!"

The sad truth is that many people in the U.S.A. measure everything in terms of Race and Privilege and consciously or subconsciously believe that White Protestant Men ought to be at the top of the hierarchy, followed by White Protestant Women, and so on down the line.

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Response to hunter (Reply #19)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 07:22 PM

21. there are more than a few of us

(white people) who wish our local tribe would take over our whole community. They build beautiful buildings, have set up a medical clinic that everyone can go to, and use their power to preserve the environment and wildlife. Jamestown S'Klallam tribe.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 04:17 AM

17. discrimination, poverty, etc

many people get into politics with support from people of their background. with native americans much of this is most likely focused within their own communities in the reservations .

and add in the usual discrimination they faced for centuries and poverty and it's not surprising. so even without the reservations they would have a tough time .




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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 03:40 PM

20. I realize it is not a major position outside

 

of Minnesota, but the chief of the 1,100 member Minneapolis Police Department is a Native American. Not only that, but the chief is a woman and is homosexual.

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Response to TshaiRedhair (Original post)

Thu Nov 13, 2014, 07:51 PM

22. There are a few.

Brad Carson is the current Undersecretary of the Army and a former Congressman from Oklahoma. He's also an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation. Keith Harper, the U.S. representative to the United Nations Human Rights Council, is also Cherokee. Additionally, there are also many Native Americans in state legislatures across the Western U.S.

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