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Sat Nov 29, 2014, 11:43 AM

Animal teams: There are some small bird species that team up for the winter -

chickadees and nuthatches tend to hang out together. There are birds that ride on the backs of large mammals to gather insects, and fish which remove parasites from other sea life. But do any animals hang together like humans, cats and dogs?

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Reply Animal teams: There are some small bird species that team up for the winter - (Original post)
hedgehog Nov 2014 OP
postulater Nov 2014 #1
femmocrat Nov 2014 #2
csziggy Nov 2014 #3
HereSince1628 Nov 2014 #4

Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Sat Nov 29, 2014, 12:35 PM

1. Geez, my wife's 3 cats don't even hang together.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Sat Nov 29, 2014, 02:13 PM

2. That is such a great question!

I would like to know that too!

Our neighbor has 3 donkeys and 2 horses. The donkeys stick together and the horses stick together, away from the donkeys. I have never seen them herd together.

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Response to femmocrat (Reply #2)

Sat Nov 29, 2014, 02:44 PM

3. Sheep, goat and llama owners will put donkeys in with them to fight off coyotes

While donkeys are less social than llamas, over several weeks they will generally come to associate with your other animals. Successful guard donkey users advise that you create a small corral for the donkey in the sheep pen where they can all become acquainted with each other over time before placing them together in a pasture situation. Donkeys do tend to become territorial although they do not patrol their area. They are an especially alert grazing animal with very good hearing and a wider field of vision than horses. They also tend to be less spooky or flighty and more likely to stand their ground than horses. If the donkey brays loudly at threats, this may discourage predators as well.

Donkeys are naturally aggressive to canines and this behavior will extend itself to their pasture mates. Donkeys are not purposefully protective of stock but are either reacting to a threat in their territory or behaving as a maternal jenny. Donkeys make acceptable guardians of sheep, goats and calves. Often the sheep or goats come to see the larger donkey as protective and will gather near it if they perceive a threat. Donkeys can protect against a single fox, coyote, roaming dog and possibly a bobcat.

Donkeys who do attack a predator will be very aggressive, using their teeth and hooves. They may bray loudly. They will charge the threat and attempt to chase it away. If they confront the predator, they will attempt to bite at the neck, back, chest or buttocks. They may slash out with their hooves or turn and kick the predator. Experienced owners strongly suggest you do not attempt to stop a donkey that is charging or attacking and that afterwards, you allow the donkey to calm down before approaching it.

Unlike a livestock guard dog, donkey will have similar maintenance and feeding requirements with its pasture mates, although they may need a taller shelter. Donkeys are natives of desert areas and lack the protective undercoat of horses. They definitely need shelter from rain and snow. Do not give donkeys access to Rumensin, urea or other feeds and supplements only intended for ruminants. Donkeys also need trace mineral salt, not the white salt eaten by sheep or goat. Donkeys will also drink more water than sheep or goats.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/guard-donkey-zbcz1310.aspx#ixzz3KU6TC7CF


ETA - in wild grazing herds of animals, often different species will graze close to each other and take advantage of the various abilities of the other species. Taller animals can see farther, others may have better hearing, etc. I've seen discussion on some wildlife show about this in Africa and in the American West but it's been a long time and I don't remember which shows those mentions were on.

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Response to hedgehog (Original post)

Sat Nov 29, 2014, 03:22 PM

4. Some species of ants appear to husband aphids

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