HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Amnesty : Cuba

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:34 PM

 

Amnesty : Cuba

Rights to freedom of expression, association, movement and assembly

Peaceful demonstrators, independent journalists and human rights activists were routinely detained for exercising their rights to freedom of expression, association and assembly. Many were detained and others were subjected to acts of repudiation by government supporters.
•In March, local human rights activists faced a wave of arrests and local organizations reported 1,137 arbitrary detentions before and after the visit of Pope Benedict XVI.

The authorities adopted a range of measures to prevent activists reporting on human rights including surrounding the homes of activists and disconnecting phones. Organizations whose activities had been tolerated by the authorities in the past, such as the Cuban Commission on Human Rights and National Reconciliation, were targeted. Independent journalists reporting on dissidents’ activities were detained.

The government continued to exert control over all media, while access to information on the internet remained challenging due to technical limitations and restrictions on content.
•In July, Oswaldo Payá Sardiñas, one of Cuba’s most respected human rights and pro-democracy campaigners, died in a car accident in Granma Province. Several journalists and bloggers covering the hearing into the accident were detained for several hours.
•Roberto de Jesús Guerra Pérez, founder of the independent news agency Let’s Talk Press (Hablemos Press), was forced into a car in September, and reportedly beaten as he was driven to a police station. Before being released, he was told that he had become the “number one dissident journalist” and would be imprisoned if he continued his activities.

A number of measures were used to stop or penalize activities by political opponents. Many attempting to attend meetings or demonstrations were detained or prevented from leaving their homes. Political opponents, independent journalists and human rights activists were routinely denied visas to travel abroad.
•For the 19th time since May 2008, Yoani Sánchez, an opposition blogger, was denied an exit visa. She had planned to attend the screening in Brazil of a documentary on blogging and censorship in which she featured.
•In September, around 50 members of the Ladies in White organization were detained on their way to Havana to attend a public demonstration. Most were immediately sent back to their home provinces and then released; 19 were held incommunicado for several days.

In October, the government announced changes to the Migration Law that facilitate travel abroad, including the removal of mandatory exit visas. However, a series of requirements – over which the government would exercise discretion – could continue to restrict freedom to leave the country. The amendments were due to become effective in January 2013.



Prisoners of conscience


Seven new prisoners of conscience were adopted by Amnesty International during the year; three were released without charge.
•Antonio Michel Lima Cruz was released in October after completing his two-year sentence. He had been convicted of “insulting symbols of the homeland” and “public disorder” for singing anti-government songs. His brother, Marcos Máiquel, who received a longer sentence for the same offences, remained in prison at the end of the year.
•Ivonne Malleza Galano and Ignacio Martínez Montejo were released in January, along with Isabel Haydee Álvarez, who was detained after calling for their release. They were held for 52 days without charge after taking part in a demonstration in November 2011. On their release, officials threatened them with “harsh sentences” if they continued dissident activities.
•Yasmín Conyedo Riverón, a journalist and representative of Ladies in White in Santa Clara province, and her husband, Yusmani Rafael Álvarez Esmori, were released on bail in April after nearly three months in prison. They faced charges of using violence or intimidation against a state official, who later withdrew the accusation.


Arbitrary detention


Short-term arbitrary detention continued and reports of short-term incommunicado detentions were frequent.
•In February, former prisoner of conscience José Daniel Ferrer García was detained and held incommunicado for three days. While detained, he was threatened with imprisonment if he continued dissident activities through the Patriotic Union of Cuba. In April, he was detained again on charges of “public disorder” and released 27 days later on condition that he give up political activism.
•Ladies in White Niurka Luque Álvarez and Sonia Garro Alfonso, and Sonia’s husband Ramón Alejandro Muñoz González, were detained without charge in March. Niurka Luque Álvarez was released in October. Sonia Garro Alfonso and her husband remained in detention at the end of the year, but had not been formally charged.
•Andrés Carrión Álvarez was arrested for shouting “freedom” and “down with communism” at a mass celebrated by Pope Benedict XVI. He was released after 16 days in prison. He was detained for five hours three days later and charged with another count of “public disorder”. He was released on condition that he report to the police once a week, and that he did not leave his home municipality without prior authorization or associate with government critics.



http://www.amnesty.org/en/region/cuba/report-2013

15 replies, 1290 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 15 replies Author Time Post
Reply Amnesty : Cuba (Original post)
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 OP
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 #1
MineralMan Dec 2014 #2
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 #4
MineralMan Dec 2014 #5
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 #3
NuclearDem Dec 2014 #6
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 #7
NuclearDem Dec 2014 #8
ohheckyeah Dec 2014 #9
LanternWaste Dec 2014 #12
Tierra_y_Libertad Dec 2014 #10
RandiFan1290 Dec 2014 #11
brooklynite Dec 2014 #13
Guy Whitey Corngood Dec 2014 #14
Rhinodawg Dec 2014 #15

Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:37 PM

1. Freedom, Justice...Meh...who cares.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:39 PM

2. Check this link, too:

http://www.amnesty.org/en/region/usa/report-2013

We're not doing so good, ourselves...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MineralMan (Reply #2)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:42 PM

4. And?

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Reply #4)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:44 PM

5. And compare. What else?

Judge not, lest ye be also judged. Someone said that once or twice, I think.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:40 PM

3. My favorite ..

 

Antonio Michel Lima Cruz was released in October after completing his two-year sentence. He had been convicted of “insulting symbols of the homeland” and “public disorder” for singing anti-government songs. His brother, Marcos Máiquel, who received a longer sentence for the same offences, remained in prison at the end of the year.

real bastion of freedom there.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 02:46 PM

6. How many of these OPs are you planning to make?

 

Just so I can brace myself.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to NuclearDem (Reply #6)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:05 PM

7. How many human rights violations can you ignore ?

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:19 PM

8. Who said I'm ignoring anything?

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:23 PM

9. And what has the embargo

accomplished?

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. Today we are getting to find out who the insane people are.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Reply #7)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:44 PM

12. Do we start with this country first, or skip to Cuba for political convenience?

"How many human rights violations can you ignore ?"

Do we start with this country first, or skip over to Cuba for political convenience and some validating Star-Spangled Awesomeness?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:41 PM

10. Amnesty: USA-Cuba prisoner swap must spur historic human rights change

 

http://www.amnestyusa.org/news/news-item/usa-cuba-prisoner-swap-must-spur-historic-human-rights-change

“Today’s prisoner swap is a very welcome opening salvo in a long-awaited overhaul of US-Cuban relations after more than half a century of thorny relations, sanctions and mutual recriminations. Any efforts at political and diplomatic change must now go hand-in-glove with historic human rights change in Cuba,” said Erika Guevara Rosas, Americas Director at Amnesty International.

“If the US embargo on Cuba, and its negative impact on the economic and social rights of Cubans, is lifted as part of efforts to normalize relations between the two countries, it will mean Cuban authorities can no longer use the crippling sanctions as an excuse for lagging behind on its international human rights obligations.”

For years, Amnesty International campaigned on behalf of the “Cuban Five”. The organization echoed concerns raised by a UN Working Group that the men were not afforded fair trials in Miami, and criticized the USA for not granting visas to allow several of the men’s wives to visit them in prison. Those released today include Gerardo Hernandez, 49, Antonio Guerrero, 56, and Ramon Labañino, 51. Two others, Rene Gonzalez, 58, and Fernando Gonzalez, 51, were previously released.

“This release after more than a decade and a half behind bars in the USA, following proceedings that fell short of international fair trial standards, must come as an immense relief for these three men and their families. Concerns raised by Amnesty International and others over their trial and treatment should have prompted US authorities to grant these men clemency years ago,” said Erika Guevara Rosas.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:44 PM

11. So glad this gets your goat!



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:44 PM

13. President Obama was clear that we weren't excusing Cuba's human rights policies

...but as with the Soviet Union, we're able to influence things more effectively through engagement.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 03:50 PM

14. Oooh, I hear Raul Castro is considering a conversion to Islam. That should give you enough ammo

to keep going for at least a decade.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rhinodawg (Original post)

Wed Dec 17, 2014, 07:48 PM

15. Should be interesting when the first american...

 

is arrested for exercising their rights to freedom of expression, association and assembly.

I'm not totally against normalizing relations with Cuba.

I just wish all political prisoners were released.( My Amnesty upbringing)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread