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gollygee

(22,336 posts)
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 09:52 AM Jun 2015

Charleston, Dylann Roof and the racism of millennials

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/post-partisan/wp/2015/06/18/charleston-racism-and-the-myth-of-tolerant-millennials/

Roof, who was born in 1994, violently shatters one particularly entrenched myth that society holds about racism — that today’s millennials are more tolerant than their parents, and that racism will magically die out as previous generations pass on. We think that millennials should be lauded for aspiring to be “colorblind.” There is the belief that tolerant young people will intermarry and create a post-racial, brown society and that it will be “beautiful.”

But the truth is that the kids are not all right when it comes to racial equality. Studies have shown that millennials are just about as racist as previous generations:

(snip)

As Jamelle Bouie at Slate noted:

Millennials have grown up in a world where we talk about race without racism — or don’t talk about it at all — and where “skin color” is the explanation for racial inequality, as if ghettos are ghettos because they are black, and not because they were created. As such, their views on racism — where you fight bias by denying it matters to outcomes — are muddled and confused.

Which gets to the irony of this survey: A generation that hates racism but chooses colorblindness is a generation that, through its neglect, comes to perpetuate it.
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Charleston, Dylann Roof and the racism of millennials (Original Post) gollygee Jun 2015 OP
Painting with a really broad brush Kelvin Mace Jun 2015 #1
It isn't about all millenials gollygee Jun 2015 #2
I would argue that they definitely are better when it comes to tolerance and judgmentalism..... marmar Jun 2015 #5
What I've read is that the level of racism is about the same but it looks different gollygee Jun 2015 #8
Agreed. trotsky Jun 2015 #15
It's based on a study, not this one person gollygee Jun 2015 #17
Today's millenials ARE more tolerant than their parents... SidDithers Jun 2015 #3
This has been studied gollygee Jun 2015 #4
That doesn't match data I have seen. yardwork Jun 2015 #7
There is data in the linked article gollygee Jun 2015 #9
Another article gollygee Jun 2015 #10
That study is more a reflection of their perceptions of racism as a problem. B2G Jun 2015 #11
It's a bit about both gollygee Jun 2015 #12
Exactly. yardwork Jun 2015 #6
Millennials were born into and live in a racist society. How can they not be racist? Brickbat Jun 2015 #13
Yeah gollygee Jun 2015 #14
I wonder though, they were born into a homophobic society too but aren't homophobic riderinthestorm Jun 2015 #19
Lack of economic opportunity and right wing politicians pandering to their base notadmblnd Jun 2015 #16
I'm posting a link to the actual study gollygee Jun 2015 #18
"Waiting for all of the old racists to die off" may very well happen someday, but it bullwinkle428 Jun 2015 #20
Roof doesn't represent millennials any more than ISIS LittleBlue Jun 2015 #21
It is using him to illustrate information from a study gollygee Jun 2015 #22
thank you marions ghost Jun 2015 #23
kick gollygee Jun 2015 #24

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
2. It isn't about all millenials
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:01 AM
Jun 2015

or everyone of every other generation. The article says that millenials are about the same as other generations, not worse.

marmar

(77,406 posts)
5. I would argue that they definitely are better when it comes to tolerance and judgmentalism.....
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:07 AM
Jun 2015

..... the problem is that they're also probably more likely to believe that racial equality exists, so they aren't as likely to recognize the problems.


gollygee

(22,336 posts)
8. What I've read is that the level of racism is about the same but it looks different
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:08 AM
Jun 2015

on the surface it might seem better because of the "colorblind" thing, but when people study and ask questions about beliefs, it's about the same.

trotsky

(49,533 posts)
15. Agreed.
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:37 AM
Jun 2015

What this "shatters" is any notion that the killer was a decent human being. That's it.

It says nothing about whether millennials are more or less racist than preceding generations. WTF, even I am annoyed by millennials at times but no way am I going to make some kind of grand proclamation based on this horrible incident.

SidDithers

(44,228 posts)
3. Today's millenials ARE more tolerant than their parents...
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:05 AM
Jun 2015

one data point - that Dylann Roof is a racist piece of shit - doesn't shatter the "entrenched myth".

Acknowledging that, as a society, millennials are more tolerant, is not the same as saying that ALL millennials are tolerant.

Sid

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
4. This has been studied
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:06 AM
Jun 2015

as referenced in the article (and there's more specific info if you click the link.) Their generation is about the same as other generations. Your personal feelings about it are not more authoritative than studies done by professionals.

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
10. Another article
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:18 AM
Jun 2015
http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2015/03/millenials-race-115909.html

News about race in America these days is almost universally negative. Longstanding wealth, income and employment gaps between whites and people of color are increasing, and tensions between police and minority communities around the country are on the rise. But many claim there’s a glimmer of hope: The next generation of Americans, they say, is “post-racial”—more tolerant, and therefore more capable of easing these race-based inequities. Unfortunately, closer examination of the data suggests that millennials aren’t racially tolerant, they’re racially apathetic: They simply ignore structural racism rather than try to fix it.

In 2010, a Pew Research report trumpeted that “the younger generation is more racially tolerant than their elders.” In the Chicago Tribune, Ted Gregory seized on this to declare millennials “the most tolerant generation in history.” These types of arguments typically cling to the fact that young people are more likely than their elders to favor interracial marriage. But while millennials are indeed less likely than baby boomers to say that more people of different races marrying each other is a change for the worse (6 percent compared to 14 percent), their opinions on that score are basically no different than those of the generation immediately before them, the Gen Xers, who come in at 5 percent. On interracial dating, the trend is similar, with 92 percent of Gen Xers saying it’s “all right for blacks and whites to date each other,” compared to 93 percent of millennials.

Furthermore, these questions don’t really say anything about racial justice: After all, interracial dating and marriage are unlikely to solve deep disparities in criminal justice, wealth, upward mobility, poverty and education—at least not in this century. (Black-white marriages currently make up just 2.2 percent of all marriages.) And when it comes to opinions on more structural issues, such as the role of government in solving social and economic inequality and the need for continued progress, millennials start to split along racial lines. When people are asked, for example, “How much needs to be done in order to achieve Martin Luther King’s dream of racial equality?” the gap between white millennials and millennials of color (all those who don’t identify as white) are wide. And once again, millennials are shown to be no more progressive than older generations: Among millennials, 42 percent of whites answer that “a lot” must be done to achieve racial equality, compared to 41 percent of white Gen Xers and 44 percent of white boomers.

(snip)

In a 2009 study using American National Election Studies—a survey of Americans before and after each presidential election—Vincent Hutchings finds, “younger cohorts of Whites are no more racially liberal in 2008 than they were in 1988.” My own analysis of the most recent data reveals a similar pattern: Gaps between young whites and old whites on support for programs that aim to further racial equality are very small compared to the gaps between young whites and young blacks.


 

B2G

(9,766 posts)
11. That study is more a reflection of their perceptions of racism as a problem.
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:26 AM
Jun 2015

It doesn't speak to the views they hold about other races.

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
12. It's a bit about both
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:30 AM
Jun 2015

for instance it talks about how feelings about interracial marriage and dating are about the same between millennial and gen xers.

And this is in the first article I posted as well:

When it comes to explicit prejudice against blacks, non-Hispanic white millennial are not much different than whites belonging to Generation X (born 1965-1980) or Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964). White millennial (using a definition of being born after 1980) express the least prejudice on 4 out of 5 measures in the survey, but only by a matter of 1 to 3 percentage points, not a meaningful difference. On work ethic, 31 percent of millennial rate blacks as lazier than whites, compared to 32 percent of Generation X whites and 35 percent of Baby Boomers.


You can see the answers to other questions here: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2015/04/07/white-millennials-are-just-about-as-racist-as-their-parents/

But it's also about structural racism, which is about "what we need to do," which requires you to see it as a problem. Part of structural racism is not recognizing that we have a lot of work to do in this country.

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
14. Yeah
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:33 AM
Jun 2015

I think that's the point. By pushing the "color blind" myth, those of us in earlier generations have let them down. We should have been talking about racism all along instead of hoping they just wouldn't see race.

 

riderinthestorm

(23,272 posts)
19. I wonder though, they were born into a homophobic society too but aren't homophobic
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 11:18 AM
Jun 2015

as a general rule.



notadmblnd

(23,720 posts)
16. Lack of economic opportunity and right wing politicians pandering to their base
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 10:43 AM
Jun 2015

has gone further to fan the flames in the reprisal of racial intolerance. With the election of Obama and the disrespect he has received from those on the right- they have sent the signal that it is okay to once again drag ones bigoted thoughts, feelings, words and actions out into the open.


bullwinkle428

(20,636 posts)
20. "Waiting for all of the old racists to die off" may very well happen someday, but it
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 11:25 AM
Jun 2015

certainly won't happen within the lifetime of anyone posting on this board as of today.

 

LittleBlue

(10,362 posts)
21. Roof doesn't represent millennials any more than ISIS
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 11:29 AM
Jun 2015

represents Muslims or the Beltway Snipers represented black Americans.

gollygee

(22,336 posts)
22. It is using him to illustrate information from a study
Fri Jun 19, 2015, 12:36 PM
Jun 2015

It does not claim he represents all millennials.

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