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Sun Apr 24, 2016, 03:50 AM

Health insurance now costs $16,000 for average family

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-care/health-insurance-now-costs-16-000-average-family-f6C10960584

The average family’s health insurance now costs about $16,000, and workers pay more than a quarter of that, according to a new survey.

But health insurance premiums for job-based family coverage rose a relatively modest 4 percent, reflecting slowed health spending, according to a survey of about 2,000 employers released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research & Educational Trust. (KHN is an editorially independent program of the foundation.)

Nonetheless, workers are likely to feel an increased pinch from health care costs: More than a third have annual deductibles of at least $1,000 this year before their insurance kicks in, while wages continue to grow far more slowly than health insurance costs.

Premiums for the average family plan topped $16,000 for the first time, with workers paying on average $4,565 toward that cost, not counting copays and deductibles, the survey found.

The average cost of a single employee’s insurance premiums rose 5 percent, to $5,884, with workers paying an average of $999, the survey found. Workers’ wages increased 1.8 percent on average, while general inflation rose 1.1 percent. The survey was done between January and May of this year.

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Reply Health insurance now costs $16,000 for average family (Original post)
eridani Apr 2016 OP
astrophuss42 Apr 2016 #1
eridani Apr 2016 #2
astrophuss42 Apr 2016 #3
eridani Apr 2016 #4
yourpaljoey Apr 2016 #5
Sancho Apr 2016 #13
Warren Stupidity Apr 2016 #15
eridani Apr 2016 #17
Sancho Apr 2016 #18
eridani Apr 2016 #20
yourpaljoey Apr 2016 #6
annominous Apr 2016 #7
AllyCat Apr 2016 #8
gordianot Apr 2016 #10
nationalize the fed Apr 2016 #16
Vinca Apr 2016 #14
Dont call me Shirley Apr 2016 #22
Scuba Apr 2016 #9
Dont call me Shirley Apr 2016 #23
ConsiderThis_2016 Apr 2016 #11
JEB Apr 2016 #19
My Good Babushka Apr 2016 #12
Dont call me Shirley Apr 2016 #21
Texasgal Apr 2016 #24

Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 03:51 AM

1. I am pretty curious

Why people don't seem to think this needs fixing.

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Response to astrophuss42 (Reply #1)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 03:54 AM

2. Most people will never be expensively sick, and therefore have no occasion--

--to find out how lousy their coverage is.

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Response to eridani (Reply #2)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 03:58 AM

3. Opposite here

I'm relatively young and healthy ... Getting treatment for quality of life health issues with my coverage is a laughable endeavour. I don't look forward to seeing them for more acute things later. If I got all of the dental care I need I probably would go bankrupt.

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Response to astrophuss42 (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 04:14 AM

4. In every age demographic, 15% of that demographic accounts for 85% of health care costs

5% accounts for 50% of costs. Though obviously 20 somethings are more likely to have expensive accidents and pregnancy complications, and 70 somethings more expensive chronic diseases.

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Response to eridani (Reply #4)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 05:17 AM

5. interesting

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Response to eridani (Reply #4)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 07:05 AM

13. True...and in "universal coverage" systems, health professionals are paid much less.

Usually 1/3 to 1/2 what US doctors and nurses are paid. There are a number of other differences depending on the variety of systems out there.

A Medicare/Medicaid option for everyone should be part of the ACA to make it better. You may have to wait longer or go to a clinic without choosing your doctor or suffer other inconveniences - but it would be essentially "free" (covered) if you didn't have the income.

The system of for-profit hospitals and pharmacy monopolies adds a lot of costs. Also, the US has a convoluted system so that the actual payment for various treatments and services is almost impossible to figure out. I think the ACA has begun to put pressure on the transparency part of the system, but there's a long way to go.


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Response to Sancho (Reply #13)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:05 AM

15. Closer to 2/3, and we overpay specialists and underpay

 

General practitioners. Under a universal system the demand for gp's would increase and so likely would their pay.

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Response to Sancho (Reply #13)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 08:33 PM

17. Med school tuition is free or heavily subsidized elsewhere

I think that plenty of health care professionals would take less money if it meant they didn't have to take on huge amounts of debt to get through school.

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Response to eridani (Reply #17)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 08:51 PM

18. If you like, there are studies that detail differences of support in different systems and the US

In general, the US pays more to health professionals (nurses, doctors, etc.) for career salaries minus debt.

If you instituted single-payer systems in the US, you would have to change LOTS of things. One would be the entire US health care training system. The other would be compensation for health care professionals.

A non-profit, universal option might be possible with a friendly Congress some day. Like Medicare it would pay less. Like Tricare, it would have access issues. Like Medicaid, some states would resist implementation. Over time it would be competitive, reveal costs, and protect those without coverage.

Single-payer has too many hurdles to overcome in the US history and systems for the foreseeable future. The US wouldn't deal well with a bunch of Doc Martins.

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Response to Sancho (Reply #18)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:01 PM

20. Unfortunately, the debt comes WAY before total lifetime earnings

I'm thinking that single payer will have to be one state at a time. Doctors went on strike in Saskatchewan when single payer was instituted there. The backed off within a couple of years because their incomes went up by a third.

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Response to astrophuss42 (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 05:19 AM

6. Life need not be that way

We should not have to worry about the healthcare 'game'

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 06:03 AM

7. I have cancer

 

And have been in treatment since Jan 2015, about 16 months. Last year my medical expenses were about a quarter of a million dollars, after the insurance company's negotiated deductions. This year will be the same or more, unless I don't make it through the year. No one ever thought I was worth that kind of $$$ when I was well. For perspective, I'm not old enough to retire, but may have to take a disability retirement. Medicaid is not an option, another discussion. I still work, though my illness is serious and debilitating, to keep my insurance and make my copays and other costs of living. My salary is not even close to my medical costs.

No one likes to think about it, but once you get cancer, you notice how many other people have it. Very tragic personally, and very expensive collectively.

Most cancer patients are cared for at home by themselves or by family members, during most of their illnesses. It wasn't hospitalization costs last year for me, but just know you don't get hospitalized like in the old days, unless your illness can't be managed at home and things go critical. Scans and such are expensive as well.

No, for me last year it was the chemo costs. Mine were the lion's share of that $quarter million. Costs of privatized cancer research. Americans are being gouged imo.

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Response to annominous (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 06:29 AM

8. I'm sorry this is happening to you.

Hoping you are feeling well and recover. Wishing we had fought for single-payer.

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Response to AllyCat (Reply #8)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 06:43 AM

10. We did and single payer came close killed by Joe Lieberman.

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Response to gordianot (Reply #10)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:31 AM

16. Funny how people always seem to forget

the role that Max Baucus (D-Insurance) played. You know, having Single Payer Advocates arrested on Capitol Hill at a hearing. It's disgraceful. You can't begin to fix a problem until you identify it.



Baucus's Raucous Caucus: Doctors, Nurses and Activists Arrested Again for Protesting Exclusion of Single-Payer Advocates at Senate Hearing on Healthcare

Advocates of single-payer universal healthcare — the system favored by most Americans — continue to protest their exclusion from discussions on healthcare reform. On Tuesday, five doctors, nurses and single-payer advocates were arrested at a Senate Finance Committee hearing, bringing the total number of arrests in less than a week to thirteen. We speak with two of those arrested: Single Payer Action founder Russell Mokhiber and Dr. Margaret Flowers of Physicians for a National Health Program...
http://www.democracynow.org/2009/5/13/baucus_raucus_caucus_doctors_nurses_and

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Response to annominous (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 08:34 AM

14. It's obscene a person with your health problems would have to continue to work to keep insurance.

There are things about this country I despise and the funding of healthcare is probably number 1 on the list. Good luck to you. I hope things improve.

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Response to annominous (Reply #7)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:06 PM

22. ....



Been there. Get well, annominous!

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 06:39 AM

9. Medicare for All, including dental, optical, hearing aids and mental health services.

 

And yes, we can afford it.

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Response to Scuba (Reply #9)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:07 PM

23. +a hundred quadrillion!

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 07:02 AM

11. The deductables are figured...

like Vegas figures odds. House always wins. Medicare for all... take out the middlemen.

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Response to ConsiderThis_2016 (Reply #11)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 08:53 PM

19. We need to stop using leeches.

 

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 07:04 AM

12. Health care costs

and therefore, access, is still on an unsustainable, disastrous path. There's more at risk than just "some improvident poors dying, who should have planned better", in an era of post-antibiotic efficacy and new diseases spreading faster due to climate change, we risk not being able to address a full-blown pandemic, with a very high mortality, due to our unwillingness to pay for it. Public health is built out of the health of every individual.

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 09:03 PM

21. FUCK Healthcare for profit!

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Response to eridani (Original post)

Sun Apr 24, 2016, 10:05 PM

24. My husband is slowly

dying of liver/kidney failure. He is currently on a transplant list. We already have medical dept at about 50,000.00. That is WITH Obamacare insurance.

My husband was gainfully employed for over 32 years with the same company. His FMLA ran out after 90 days when he had to stop working. We have SSDI currently, which is helping but medicare benefits will take two years to qualify! Ridiculous if you ask me!

We will owe close to a million once this is all over with *that's IF he makes it* and we pay a hefty price monthly for his insurance and meds.

I never thought we'd ever be in this situation ever. We will never be able to pay off the bills... it's a nightmare.

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