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Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:17 PM

I remember the Internet back in the early 1990s.

Actually, even before that, in the late 1980s, when the place I worked installed a modem for me so that I could use "crawlers" to search for references from government and higher education databases accessible online. But in the early 90s, there were basically three "Online Providers" available in our area: Prodigy, CompuServ, and (a bit later) America Online.

Prodigy and CompuServ were similar in that they would, for a monthly fee, allow you to access email and other services. CompuServ offered a command line and more-or-less direct access, and Prodigy gave you a "Services" diskette that enabled a primitive content portal where you could subscribe to games, restaurant reviews and other stuff. I had direct access via work, so I subscribed to Prodigy for home/personal use, largely because back then it was a monthly flat-fee charge.

I don't remember much about it other than getting hooked into a couple of music message boards and text-based games. I found myself spending a fair amount of time on that stuff, probably 6-8 hours a week, arguing passionately about metal bands, the evolution of the blues, how to drive a permanent stake through the heart of disco, and how to add inline die-roll macros to various game elements.

Back then, IIRC, a one-month *P (as we called it) subscription was $7.95. At one point they added "premium" services that used a richer content interface and I think those were billed at an hourly rate with various access packages. So if you wanted to play 8-bit games online, or see websites with a lot of graphic content, or do certain kinds of online shopping, etc., you paid extra.

In about 1994, I think it was, I switched over to AOL, which at that time had a basic fee structure of $5.95 for a certain number of hours a month (might have been 10? not sure I remember correctly) and after that, a per-minute charge. You could also buy, for a larger monthly fee, more 'basic' hours and a slightly lower per-minute premium charge. I knew I was a heavy user so I opted for that, but even so, between then and 1996, I maxed out some credit cards and got into serious financial trouble.

So many people got into serious issues with those per-minute charges that it was a real issue. I knew people who (back then, in the 90s!) were seeing $400-500/month AOL charges on their credit cards. As soon as you could afford to, you upgraded your modem to the fastest available, so that your mail loaded faster, your chat hit the screen faster, you maximized those minutes as much as you could.

I learned to jump on, save to offline storage, jump off, read stuff, compose replies in text files, jump back on, cut and paste and send, in order to have the most time available for real-time chatting and game playing. I did all my searching at work, staying late to use their interface. Even so, personal access to the Internet got expensive. I was damn' glad when they went to the flat-fee structure in 1996. Shortly after that I discovered IRC and largely left AOL behind. A couple of years later, internal high-speed modems and local ISPs were offering browser-based access with almost everything I needed.

But I remember having to calculate every minute of use, every strategem to maximize access to the stuff I wanted while keeping costs down.

I guess it's a set of skills I'll find new uses for, now.

Thanks, Ajit Pai, you rancid pile of refuse.

disgustedly,
Bright

64 replies, 4897 views

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Arrow 64 replies Author Time Post
Reply I remember the Internet back in the early 1990s. (Original post)
TygrBright Dec 2017 OP
kentuck Dec 2017 #1
TygrBright Dec 2017 #3
Atman Dec 2017 #2
TygrBright Dec 2017 #4
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #30
infullview Dec 2017 #50
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #53
Clarity2 Dec 2017 #5
DBoon Dec 2017 #6
TygrBright Dec 2017 #7
trackfan Dec 2017 #8
Leith Dec 2017 #9
hunter Dec 2017 #10
TygrBright Dec 2017 #12
steve2470 Dec 2017 #17
steve2470 Dec 2017 #19
steve2470 Dec 2017 #11
MineralMan Dec 2017 #13
steve2470 Dec 2017 #15
MineralMan Dec 2017 #18
lunamagica Dec 2017 #21
steve2470 Dec 2017 #25
MineralMan Dec 2017 #26
lunamagica Dec 2017 #29
MineralMan Dec 2017 #32
lunamagica Dec 2017 #33
blaze Dec 2017 #38
MineralMan Dec 2017 #39
blaze Dec 2017 #47
TygrBright Dec 2017 #14
steve2470 Dec 2017 #16
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #34
lunamagica Dec 2017 #20
FarCenter Dec 2017 #22
csziggy Dec 2017 #23
lunamagica Dec 2017 #31
csziggy Dec 2017 #35
blaze Dec 2017 #41
csziggy Dec 2017 #44
RandomAccess Dec 2017 #61
Egnever Dec 2017 #24
pecosbob Dec 2017 #27
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #28
steve2470 Dec 2017 #36
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #51
steve2470 Dec 2017 #52
RKP5637 Dec 2017 #54
steve2470 Dec 2017 #58
JHB Dec 2017 #37
fescuerescue Dec 2017 #40
lpbk2713 Dec 2017 #42
Stonepounder Dec 2017 #43
NewJeffCT Dec 2017 #46
NewJeffCT Dec 2017 #45
Marthe48 Dec 2017 #48
Kablooie Dec 2017 #49
stonecutter357 Dec 2017 #55
Mosby Dec 2017 #56
PoliticAverse Dec 2017 #57
Basic LA Dec 2017 #59
brooklynite Dec 2017 #60
kwassa Dec 2017 #62
Stinky The Clown Dec 2017 #63
ThoughtCriminal Dec 2017 #64

Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:22 PM

1. I remember those Prodigy discussion groups!

AOL was very popular for a while. Compuserve was an old reliable. But I was a long-time Prodigy customer.

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Response to kentuck (Reply #1)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:25 PM

3. Yeah, *P was where the cool kids hung... LOL... n/t

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:25 PM

2. Once again, going BACKWARD...to Make America Great Again.

I totally relate to your story. Kinda forgot all about those days. As with everything else, the GOP seems to want to take America backwards by a few decades.

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Response to Atman (Reply #2)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:26 PM

4. Those who won't learn from history... n/t

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Response to Atman (Reply #2)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:18 PM

30. We can always use teletypes again!!! I used to use them to load small programs into mainframes. n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #30)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:08 PM

50. I think you mean punch cards

Teletype machines were essentially typewriters with selanoids to actuate the keys.

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Response to infullview (Reply #50)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:12 PM

53. Nope, punched tapes with programs loaded into a teletype tied into the mainframe. The

teletype had an interface into the mainframe. This was for small maintenance programs. The card readers were used for large programs.


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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:32 PM

5. Blast from the past

Prodigy was my first forum. I don't recall how much I paid, so it couldn't have been much. Think it was AOL. I didn't explore a lot. I remember there was a list out there somwhere of websites that were available online, but I didn't venture out there until browsers were available. I had a pretty strong knowledge of DOS back then, which I recall having to use a lot. But if you asked me now, all that knowledge is gone.

Didn't realize people were racking up charges back then. I was a very young mother, and living on a tight budget. Repubs know limiting access, like limiting education, will keep poor people ignorant and in control.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:33 PM

6. You could do online shopping on Compuserve

with the handful of vendors that had a business relationship with that service

Something we may get to look forward to again

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Response to DBoon (Reply #6)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:34 PM

7. Yeah, *P had online shopping basic and premium. n/t

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 01:50 PM

8. My wife and I met through a Prodigy singles ad.

I still have a legacy prodigy.net email.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:09 PM

9. I Was There, Too!

I got started on a Unix based student account. Mainly I was on IRC (Internet Relay Chat) where I met my now husband. Once I got the Internet Phonebook (this was before Google et al), I was amazed at how many different things you could look up.

Those were the days when putting a red rose in your text was called "graphics." Well, until webpages started putting in LSD-inspired backgrounds.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:37 PM

10. I was on GEnie and Delphi.

Delphi was the first to open internet service to the general public.

I first signed onto the actual internet in the later 'seventies. There were long periods of time I had no business there, when I wasn't enrolled as a student and I didn't work for any entity on the internet, but I persisted and was granted access by the grace of others. From home I'd log on with a 300 Baud modem. Even a slow reader can keep up with the text as it appears on the screen at that speed. The entire university was connected to the internet via a 56k connection. (Technically it wasn't a consumer level 56k modem. Those came later.)

My wife and I had an AOL account for a few years because friends and family had AOL accounts. If you wanted to send them email, or otherwise interact with them by computer, you had to use AOL. AOL was an island then, much as facebook is an island now for so many people. My parents still use an AOL email account.

Until we got a local ISP in the early 'nineties, I remember using the Sprint dial up network to connect to Delphi or AOL. The per-minute charges were a really big deal. You'd go in, grab what you were looking for, or post what you had to say, and then get out. You'd grab your email headers, disconnect, decide which emails were worth reading, log in again, and grab only those.

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Response to hunter (Reply #10)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:44 PM

12. Yep, I still have a legacy AOL account, too.

Per-minute charges enabled Steve Case to buy Time Warner, they were that lucrative.

I try not to slang off Mr. Case too vigorously because without him, The World's Most Wonderful Human Being and I would not be married. But he knew a good thing, and squoze it for all it was worth.

Any bets on whether some similar type of profit-making scheme will emerge now?

wearily,
Bright

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Response to TygrBright (Reply #12)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:51 PM

17. I still have a legacy AOL email acccount too

more for sentimental reasons than anything practical.

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Response to hunter (Reply #10)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:53 PM

19. You are a true nerd's nerd, I worship you haha

Seriously, I never heard of the internet at all until 1993's blather about information superhighway. Even then I didn't really pay close attention. It wasn't until 1996 that I got informed and really logged on.

Keep rocking, fellow internet denizen

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:42 PM

11. I remember those horrible AOL per minute charges *shudder* the bad old days

If anyone thinks for one second that the big ISP's are going to have mercy on us....

think again. Yes, it will not happen overnight or tomorrow. But gradually, they will start boiling the frog, raising prices and offering special highest speed deals for the richest customers, businesses and websites while relegating the rest of us to the "standard plan". THEY ARE ALL ABOUT PROFIT. It's simple. If they can legally raise profit (and sometimes illegally), they don't care about any kind of morality or customer welfare.

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Response to steve2470 (Reply #11)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:45 PM

13. I used GEnie and Compuserve

pretty much from their starting dates. GO POLITICS! That was my introduction to political discussion groups.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #13)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:46 PM

15. I never knew about GEnie but I used Compuserve briefly

I thought it was a good service, but I preferred AOL. I never did politics back then, my relatively apolitical period of my younger days.

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Response to steve2470 (Reply #15)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:51 PM

18. I used Compuserve until about 2000.

I was using the Internet, too, of course, starting about 1993. Compuserve had its own browser, and I used that for some time, before switching to a stand-alone browser.

My first two business websites were hosted on Compuserve's OurWorld server, and was built with the Compuserve WYSIWYG editor. Then, when Microsoft launched FrontPage, I switched to real Internet hosting. I think that was in 1997. At the time, I had one of the first three websites selling mineral specimens to collectors.

It used to be lots of fun. Now, it's become just another work opportunity for me. Oh well. The excitement is gone forever, now.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #18)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:00 PM

21. Right. While I don't miss the prices, I miss the excitement so much! I trhought I was the only one

who felt that way.

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Response to lunamagica (Reply #21)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:07 PM

25. me too, it was very exciting! nt

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Response to lunamagica (Reply #21)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:09 PM

26. You're never the only one.

For me, the access to like-minded people was the main attraction of those online services, and then the Internet. I gravitated immediately to discussion forums, and have never looked back.

Prior to the Internet, but during the GEnie and Compuserve days, I also ran a very busy BBS that had its own message boards. Since it also supported my shareware software company, it had members from all over the world. It, too, had a political message board.

I can't even count the number of articles I wrote for the computer magazines about modems, online services, communication software, bulletin board software and the like. It was one of my specialties as a freelance writer. I reviewed modems, online services and that software, too. In the modem days, writing about getting connected was a big part of my work for PC World, Compute! and other magazines in the 80s and 90s.

The communications possibilities of the Internet and even those old online services was huge. I don't know how anyone couldn't be excited by the possibilities.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #26)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:17 PM

29. It opened a whole new world. It was a fantastic feeling. But I thoulght I was the only one for whom

the excitement is gone.

I had a subscription to PC World and Internet...I think it was Internet Magazine? I devoured each issue

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Response to lunamagica (Reply #29)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:20 PM

32. Then you probably read some of my articles in PC World.

I wrote for them for 12 years during and after that period.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #32)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:21 PM

33. I'm sure I did!

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #32)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:34 PM

38. I probably did too!

I was a diehard TAPCIS user and only gave it up when the format changed at CompuServe and forced my hand.

Made some very good friend's on CServe's LAWSIG forum.

Nice memories.

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Response to blaze (Reply #38)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:38 PM

39. Compuserve had tons of discussion forums.

They were very active, and well-moderated. DU reminds me a lot of their main Politics Forum. I'm betting that I'm not the only one here who participated in that CIS forum, either.

My little shareware software company had its own support area on Compuserve, too. It's support forum was fairly busy, since it was a great place to download the shareware programs I created, along with tons of fun freeware stuff.

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Response to MineralMan (Reply #39)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:50 PM

47. My Dad (and I'm 63) was a SYSOP

and was enthusiastically touting the possibilities of the internet and "electronic mail" very early on.

I consider myself a pretty early adapter, but only because my Dad pretty much insisted that my sister and I get on board. Pop

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Response to steve2470 (Reply #11)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:45 PM

14. Yep. Prepare for a comeback.

Probably in a slightly different form, but it'll amount to the same thing in the end.

sadly,
Bright

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Response to TygrBright (Reply #14)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:48 PM

16. yes it will

I do think this atrocity will be overturned eventually, but it really sucks we have to go through this periodically unless we get a good law and/or Constitutional Amendment.

It's really great the smarter Republicans are with us. It's not just a "partisan" issue, it's a human issue of access to information and services.

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Response to TygrBright (Reply #14)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:22 PM

34. ... guess we'll have to go back to shortwave radio, all become hams, and hope they don't jam the

airwaves and/or use triangulation to find us! Yep, right back into WWII days with hidden radios/xmitters.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 02:53 PM

20. I remember how expensive AOL and CompuServe were

I never knew about Prodigy's flat fee. It would have saved me a lot of money

My favorite was CompuServe, and it was so frustrating to have to time myself to use it.

It would be horrific to go back to a per-minute charge. The world has changed so much since then and being able to use the internet 24/7 for a flat-fee has been the norm for years. I can see riots over this.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:00 PM

22. Neither Prodigy, Compuserv, AOL, nor GEnie started out as part of the internet

 

Nor did they use internet technology in the beginning. All but GEnie transitioned to internet technology and interconnections during the early '90s. The first ISP to provide connections to commercial entities appears to have been PSINet.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prodigy_(online_service)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CompuServe#Internet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AOL#198391:_Early_years
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GEnie
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSINet
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Internet#Use_in_wider_society_1990s_to_early_2000s_(Web_1.0)

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:04 PM

23. CompuServe was the place for tech support

Many companies had message boards where users - often professionals supporting businesses - could interact with technical personnel from major tech companies to find answers.

I hung out on the CompuServe message boards for years. The per minute charges were crippling, but most of us used a wonderful program called TAPCIS (The Access Program for the Compuserve Information Service) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TapCIS). Tapcis allowed users to go online for short bursts - a typical session would let you download message headers and replies to your previous messages. Then you would mark the headers you wanted to read, write replies, go back online, retrieve the marked headers and upload your replies. You could take you time offline, reading threads and writing replies to those, then go back online to upload all those.

Rather than spending hours online reading threads live, I would spend a few minutes a day online with TAPCIS and reading and replying offline. It saved me hundreds of dollars.

Sometime after AOL acquired CompuServe, they upgraded the archaic servers that used the software that TAPCIS could access and the program no longer worked. There is still a community of TAPICS friends but it no longer very active so far as I know.

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Response to csziggy (Reply #23)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:20 PM

31. I used that program too! I remember how excited I was when I logged on

and saw the message that I had replies to my posts

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Response to lunamagica (Reply #31)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:24 PM

35. TAPCIS was certainly a wonderfu program back in those days

I remember people who even in the late 1990s who still used MS-DOS machines and TAPCIS to keep in touch.

My husband and I had a subscription to The Source when it was acquired by TAPCIS. The Source had no good message board system or any economical way to access their information. TAPCIS got me hooked on message boards and forums!

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Response to csziggy (Reply #35)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:39 PM

41. I was a TAPCIS user too!

I must have had a 300 baud connection at first, because I could read the messages as they downloaded. I'm guessing by the time I hit 2400 baud it was a bit more efficient.

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Response to blaze (Reply #41)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:45 PM

44. I think I was up to 1200 baud by the time we started with TAPCIS

At the end it was about 5600 - flying speeds!

Our first modem on an Apple ][ was 300 baud with the telephone receiver hookup.The speed was decreased by our rural telephone lines. At one curse down road, there was a stick in the mudpuddle with two cables coming up out of the much wrapped in plastic held in place with duct tape. Every so often someone would run over the stick and we not only lost internet, we had no phone.

These days we have 40 Mbps broadband and stream our TV programs - what a difference thirty five years makes!

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Response to csziggy (Reply #44)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 10:21 PM

61. This is still one of my favorite

 

sounds --


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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:07 PM

24. I remember putting the phone handset on the cradle

 

LOL about the time I was heavily into dungeons and dragons...


Wee good times.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:13 PM

27. I also remember

when AOL would block you from that 'other' fledgling sports network called ESPN...AOL produced their own sports news and didn't want you spending time on those other sites. So if I wanted to visit ESPN's site, I couldn't do it on AOL.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:15 PM

28. Maybe we can go back to the ARPANET! I used to use with with Telnet in the 70's , a terminal,

an Epson dot matrix printer and maybe a 1 Baud (lol) modem.

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #28)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:25 PM

36. haha I would have to learn some things :) nt

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Response to steve2470 (Reply #36)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:09 PM

51. LOL! Like always keep a tube tester handy when working on an ENIAC computer with 18,000 tubes! Yep!

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #51)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:11 PM

52. wow I feel bad for that guy! nt

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Response to steve2470 (Reply #52)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:14 PM

54. Imagine how hot it got in there. One problem was enough cooling so solder joints did not melt!!! n/t

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Response to RKP5637 (Reply #54)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:15 PM

58. wow...more feelings for the poor guy! job security I guess nt

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:32 PM

37. Marty! We're going Back! To the Usenet!

Is there a talk.democraticunderground ?

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:38 PM

40. None of those were the "internet"

They were basically walled garden paid gardens, but we called them BBS's. They later added internet access, but internet was separate.

I've been on the Internet since late 80's. And used free BBS and paid BBS (the services you spoke of) since the early 80's.
I've never paid a per minute fee for Internet. Ever.

Net Neutrality is a good thing and we need it, but this isn't the argument.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:40 PM

42. Back then it looked like Freepville's website looks today.




They don't handle changes too well.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:44 PM

43. Oh my. The 'Good Old Days'

300 Baud modems
GEnie
Wildcat BBS
MUDs (Met my wife on a MUD called Barren Realms)
Text based games - ZORK anyone?

My first computer was a TRS-80 with 4k of memory and a cassette player as its boot device. I then got a Radio Shack laptop (actually more of a 'luggable')

Walking into a 'Computer Store' with a different aisle for each 'brand' of computer.

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Response to Stonepounder (Reply #43)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:49 PM

46. I remember ZORK!

thinking it was awesome at the time.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:49 PM

45. I remember when Prodigy started charging on a per email basis

I think that killed them.

I had a 4 letter username in AOL, which was no longer allowed in future versions. However, my username remained valid - maybe it was grandfathered in? I used AOL for email until the early 2000s, and still used it as a backup for several years later until I could get my password reset anymore

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 03:51 PM

48. We had a Leading Edge computer

(lol) and a modem that was supposed to be faster than it was, but ATT didn't have fiber optic cable, so we topped out around 26K.

I still think the sound of a modem connecting is one of the most exciting sounds I ever heard. Not that I want to go back to that. I got a job working from home while we still had the modem. I'd cry because it was so slow. My husband kept after Charter cable and we finally got a cable Internet connection. Huge difference. He ran cable to every room in the house, except the kitchen and dining room-haha, the only reason he didn't run it there was because wireless came along.

I still have AOL, Netscape, Prodigy disks, DOS books, just a huge pile of early Internet material. I remember the Internet telephone book, and I might still have a copy of it somewhere.

Thanks for flashing all those memories

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:04 PM

49. I guess we could go back to dial up bulletin boards.

They aren't censoring the phone lines. (yet)

(I used GEnie, myself)

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:14 PM

55. K&R

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:15 PM

56. I used compuserve in the early days

But the action was on the BBSs.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 04:15 PM

57. Remember how terrible the Internet was in 2015, before "net neutrality"?

Last edited Fri Dec 15, 2017, 05:58 PM - Edit history (1)

All those monthly charging services were eliminated by competition, which really is more important than "net neutrality"
as net neutrality doesn't address what your monthly Internet costs or what if any data caps you have (data caps
penalize video and are allowed under net neutrality).

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 05:40 PM

59. I still use my CompuServe email address.

CS.com. It's sentimental.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 05:42 PM

60. Ever wonder why that pricing structure didn't survive?

People weren't willing to pay for the service. And somebody offered something better.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 11:11 PM

62. Netcom!

How I met my wife. A Usenet romance.

Tin and pine newsreaders. All text, no pics. Pre-WWW.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Fri Dec 15, 2017, 11:47 PM

63. Hand In the Air: Veteran of more than a few $400 months on AOL.

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Response to TygrBright (Original post)

Sat Dec 16, 2017, 12:57 PM

64. What I expect from Ajit-Net

Consumers will at best be stuck in 2017. Anything faster, better, new and innovative will cost extra.

And you'll see a constant decrease in value. Sort of like how that box of cupcakes is the same size and price, but now has six cakes instead of eight.


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