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Sun May 6, 2018, 08:36 AM

Voter eligibility battle heightens in New Hampshire

Source: Axios

Khorri Atkinson 4 hours ago

New Hampshire lawmakers have advanced a key voting rights measure along party lines this week tightening residency requirements to vote — a move critics say deliberately targets college students and others who are more likely to vote Democratic.

The state of play: Currently, out-of-state students and others who aren’t fully residents can declare the state their domicile for voting purposes. The measure seeks to require voters to prove they are a resident of the state by obtaining a state driver’s license and registering their vehicle. Those who don’t drive would have to show alternate documents to validate their permanent residency status.

What they’re saying: Republicans argue it’s an attempt to confirm that eligible voters are residents of the state, and they dismissed accusations that votes would be suppressed.

However, critics like the American Civil Liberties Union of New Hampshire and Jason Kander, the former Democratic Missouri Secretary of State and president of Let America Vote, labeled the change as a “poll tax.” They argue it's an additional barrier to voting because people would be forced to pay fees for vehicle registration and obtaining a license.



Read more: https://www.axios.com/voter-eligibility-battle-heightens-in-new-hampshire--7741d0cc-c9c0-42d5-bd39-e9d2b04040bb.html

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Arrow 23 replies Author Time Post
Reply Voter eligibility battle heightens in New Hampshire (Original post)
DonViejo May 2018 OP
Mister Ed May 2018 #1
progree May 2018 #2
JustABozoOnThisBus May 2018 #3
progree May 2018 #5
hughee99 May 2018 #7
progree May 2018 #8
JustABozoOnThisBus May 2018 #12
progree May 2018 #19
JustABozoOnThisBus May 2018 #20
progree May 2018 #23
Hortensis May 2018 #21
modrepub May 2018 #4
crazycatlady May 2018 #14
madville May 2018 #6
stuffmatters May 2018 #15
Nitram May 2018 #9
progree May 2018 #10
Nitram May 2018 #11
Jedi Guy May 2018 #13
stuffmatters May 2018 #16
Jedi Guy May 2018 #17
stuffmatters May 2018 #18
Jedi Guy May 2018 #22


Response to DonViejo (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 09:15 AM

2. So out-of-state college students in N.H. are expected to go back to their home state to vote?

That's what a lot of these voter suppression tactics against students are about -- to make one jump through a lot of hoops in order to vote in the state where they spend 9 months of the year in college. Or to have to return to their home precinct in their home state (that they spend 3 or fewer months of the year in) the first week of November to vote -- which is in the middle of the academic quarter or semester, so is a big barrier to voting.

(I know the election isn't ALWAYS the first week of November -- its the Tuesday following the first Monday of November, so sometimes it's Nov. 8 -- like in 2016). And while I'm at it, what about other elections like primaries...

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Response to progree (Reply #2)

Sun May 6, 2018, 09:50 AM

3. Go home to vote, or use an absentee ballot.

As long as they vote somewhere, how is the right to vote impacted?

Absentee ballots are easy. A college student should be able to handle it.

Plus, many will already be back in the home state for the summer, so can vote in the primary there.

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Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #3)

Sun May 6, 2018, 11:05 AM

5. Just go home, during the first week of November is not easy for everyone

it's not like everyone is going to college 50 miles from where they live -- some end up several states away like I did.

As for getting an absentee ballot -- yes, that shouldn't be too hard (I've never voted absentee). But like voter ID, its an extra hurdle that can be navigated, but many don't bother to find out how and get it done. And yes, we can tsk tsk tsk them to death for not making the extra effort, but it's a fact that with each hurdle that right-wing greedbangers erect (that are designed to disproportionately affect Democratic-leaning voters), there is some percentage who don't take the time to cross it. Sometimes enough to change an election outcome. That's the main way voter suppression works.

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Response to progree (Reply #5)

Sun May 6, 2018, 11:31 AM

7. When I was in college, I went several hundred miles away and I voted absentee.

I had no problems doing it and didn't feel like there was an attempt to suppress my vote. If you're going to argue that making someone vote absentee because they can't make it to the polls on election day is a method of voter suppression, then I'm not sure there's any system that you'll find acceptable.

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Response to hughee99 (Reply #7)

Sun May 6, 2018, 11:39 AM

8. People ought to be able to register in the state they spend 9 months out of 12 in if they choose

When I went to college, I don't remember registering, but probably there were tables in the student union and people encouraging people to register. Or it might have been same day registration, I don't remember. But either way it was practically effortless. And nobody gave a fuck where I spent my summer (nor should they).

And I didn't have another home state. I moved from New Mexico where I went to military school for 3 years to Illinois, with no intention of ever returning to New Mexico (and I haven't).

During the summer, I spent about 8 weeks in Navy NROTC training, and the rest of the summer with my parents (American citizens) in S. Korea and Nigeria.

The righties count on complacent or right-leaning people saying "so what" as barrier after barrier is added. And "it was easy" or "it didn't take me long", without understanding that it's not quick and easy for everyone.

I see they voted on party lines on this bill. Are the Democrats wrong on this issue? Maybe we should slam the fuck out of the Democrats on this one, and get a free pass on this one from the Admins?

And I didn't have a car when I was in college, or a driver's license.

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Response to progree (Reply #5)

Sun May 6, 2018, 03:48 PM

12. Which hurdle is higher?

Getting an absentee ballot (from my town) is a matter of downloading a form from the town's web site, mailing it in, and getting the ballot. Voting in the university town is a matter of going to city hall, registering to vote, then go to the poll (or get an absentee ballot ) and vote.

A normal student schedule would have them vote at home for the primary (summer), then at the college town for the general. Vote where it's convenient, just don't vote in both places for the same election.

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Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #12)

Sun May 6, 2018, 08:30 PM

19. I'm sure I registered at the student union or at the polling place. At the student union

and other places around the campus there were tables with people registering people. So it was more than easy, it was all right there. And nobody asked me or gave a fuck where I spent my summer (nor should they).

As far as absentee voting, it would take extra effort to check the state's Secretary of State's Office website which has all the instructions, in Minnesota, and do the absentee stuff. Yes, tsk tsk tsk the lazy people that don't make that extra effort. For that matter, tsk tsk tsk on the 50% or more people of that age who don't vote because its too much of a pain in the butt. The righties are depending on us to go along with the tsk tsk tsk shaming of people (especially people from marginalized communities) who don't make the little extra effort to climb over their hurdles, like this and Voter ID. They depend on us to repeat their talking points. The reality of the situation is that it gives them a few percentage point edge.

That's why they do it. That's how voter suppression works.

I noticed that the vote in New Hampshire on this bill is on party lines. Are the Democrats (and the ACLU) wrong on this issue?

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Response to progree (Reply #19)

Mon May 7, 2018, 04:30 AM

20. Of course NH Dems are voting for the bill, ...

... as students are probably more likely to vote for the Democratic candidates. NH Reps are against the bill for the same reason.

If the bill passes, it's a zero-sum issue. Any vote gained by NH Dems is a vote lost by the MN (or wherever home was) Dems.

And, for the 50% who don't vote, it's a non-issue. It doesn't matter in which state they don't vote.

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Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #20)

Mon May 7, 2018, 07:43 AM

23. No, it is not a zero sum issue -- if you take away the easiest option a certain percent just won't

Last edited Mon May 7, 2018, 08:42 AM - Edit history (1)

bother with the remaining option (registering and voting absentee) that involves more research and work.

Of course NH Dems are voting for the bill, ...

... as students are probably more likely to vote for the Democratic candidates. NH Reps are against the bill for the same reason.


Well, no kidding.

If the bill passes, it's a zero-sum issue. Any vote gained by NH Dems is a vote lost by the MN (or wherever home was) Dems.


Not true at all, and that's what the whole point is

AGAIN. It's very easy to register on campus - register at the tables in the student union or the library (where if you walk by too close, someone asks "sir/ma'am are you registered to vote"?, and vote on or near campus too, with your friends (peer pressure or peer reenforcement)).

A certain percent will not bother with the absentee stuff in their "home state" (say MN) because it's an extra step to find out how to do it and do it. AND THAT IS THE WHOLE POINT.

A lot of students don't give a shit about elections until like a month before (I know, tsk tsk), and if they aren't registered in MN -- then they can't vote absentee there. One can register by mail if one sends in certain documentation (extra step, extra effort, a certain percent won't bother with that, and yes, we can tsk tsk tsk them just like the righties do for being lazy etc. but the fact of the matter is that each extra hurdle dissuades some extra number of potential voters).

That's how voter suppression works.

When they make it harder to vote, fewer people will vote. That's just the reality of the situation.

I'm sure you know that. So why are you arguing otherwise?

A person ought to be able to register and vote where they spend 9 out of 12 months of the year for 4 years in a row. Taking that option away (or making it substantially more difficult) is going to knock out some who would otherwise vote. And it's just flat out undemocratic with a small d.

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Response to JustABozoOnThisBus (Reply #12)

Mon May 7, 2018, 05:22 AM

21. Sure, but the hurdle's the law, and both of the detours around it

will have been the height the Republicans needed for all the votes that end up suppressed. Completely unacceptable.

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Response to progree (Reply #2)

Sun May 6, 2018, 10:04 AM

4. More Hurdles

Back in the day when I was in college I always changed my registration to where I was living at the time so I could vote. While I was in state, thank goodness because out of state tuition was much higher, I never had a problem and always voted in both primary and general. I'm assuming NH has out of state tuition and makes it hard to establish residency so it's (state) colleges can collect the out of state tuition differential. If that's true then their main argument falls apart and this is just another way to prevent certain types of people from voting.

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Response to modrepub (Reply #4)

Sun May 6, 2018, 06:46 PM

14. in state tuition applies to state schools

NH (and every other state) has private schools where this does not apply.

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Response to DonViejo (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 11:13 AM

6. Makes sense to me

Seems simple, register to vote for whatever State your driver's license is issued by or that you claim residence in.

I'm working in California for an extended period, my car and DL are still registered in another state that I claim as my residence. I wouldn't expect California to let me vote here if I'm not a resident.

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Response to madville (Reply #6)

Sun May 6, 2018, 07:17 PM

15. Not everybody has a drivers license or car. Esp poor & students i.e. Democratic Voters

The spurious, Repug drivers license requirement is the main mechanism/ foundation of Republican Voter ID laws to suppress Democratic votes. That and State Photo ID's cost time,money and often great inconvenience to travel to locations they're issued. How close is your own DMV (mine is 30 miles away) and how much time & money would it cost to get you there without a car?

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Response to DonViejo (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 12:45 PM

9. They tried that in Maine when Was a college student there in 1972.

Last edited Sun May 6, 2018, 02:26 PM - Edit history (1)

Fortunately, it didn't go through and I voted for McGovern. I remember seeing in a bathroom stall:

"Don't pull your Dick out in the middle of a screw, vote for Nixon in '72."
This is the DU member formerly known as Nitram.

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Response to Nitram (Reply #9)


Response to progree (Reply #10)

Sun May 6, 2018, 02:27 PM

11. Of course! Typo.

This is the DU member formerly known as Nitram.

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Response to DonViejo (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2018, 03:56 PM

13. I don't see an issue here.

Going to school in a state doesn't automatically make you a resident of that state. And getting an absentee ballot isn't exactly one of the labors of Hercules, as others on this thread have pointed out.

Furthermore, what's to stop a student from voting in the state their university is in and also mailing in an absentee ballot for back home? They can claim some form of "residency" in both places.

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Response to Jedi Guy (Reply #13)

Sun May 6, 2018, 07:28 PM

16. Yes, going to school in a state does entitle you to residency status while you live there.

You are repeating 2 familiar RW talking points to prevent, in this case, younger voters from participating in our democracy in the community in which they have chosen to live. And voting in 2 places is a crime, that's what prevents people from doing it.

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Response to stuffmatters (Reply #16)

Sun May 6, 2018, 07:45 PM

17. It's my opinion on the matter.

If you feel like it's a "RW talking point" then that's your problem. To me it's common sense. Getting an absentee ballot for one's home state is not an insurmountable obstacle, as others on the thread have pointed out. This is a far cry from requiring specific kinds of ID or other restrictions on voting. At bottom, one doesn't just get to decide on the fly which state is one's home state.

Also, laws don't prevent people from doing something; they punish people after the fact, assuming they're caught. Also also, I notice that you're not accusing others who voiced the same opinion of "repeating RW talking points."

Edit to add: For tax purposes, it appears that going to school in a state does not automatically make one a resident of that state. One must "take action" to establish residency in order for it to be one's home state.

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Response to Jedi Guy (Reply #17)

Sun May 6, 2018, 08:17 PM

18. I don't agree with anything you're claiming period.

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Response to stuffmatters (Reply #18)

Mon May 7, 2018, 07:14 AM

22. A quick Google search will bear it out.

I notice you're not making a rebuttal against my argument. Instead, you're sticking your fingers in your ears and yelling "Nuh uh!" Now that is a RW position.

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