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BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 06:41 AM Sep 2023

Health advisory issued for rare bacterial infection that has claimed the lives of a dozen Americans

Source: USA Today

Published 9:29 p.m. ET Sept. 6, 2023

A health alert has been issued by The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in response to recent reports of a fatal bacterial infection that thrives in warm coastal waters. The Vibrio vulnificus bacteria can be found in raw or undercooked seafood, saltwater, and brackish water. The most common way to become infected is when an open wound comes into contact with vibrio bacteria in water.

At least a dozen people have died from the infection across the country this year. About 80,000 people get vibrio infections each year. Of those infected, about 100 people will die from the infection annually in the U.S., according to the CDC. As ocean waters continue to warm due to climate change, the Vibrio vulnificus is migrating north, studies have found.

"The warmer water is, the more bacteria can reproduce faster," researcher Gabby Barbarite at Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce, Florida told USA Today. Infections have increased eight-fold between 1988 and 2018 around he country, according to research published in March in the journal Nature Portfolio.

The bacteria and infections are spreading northwards up the East Coast at a rate of about 30 miles a year, researchers share. "Cases used to be concentrated almost exclusively in the Gulf of Mexico in the southern United States," Dr. William Schaffner, an infectious disease expert at Vanderbilt University, told USA TODAY earlier this year.

Read more: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2023/09/06/cdc-flesh-eating-bacteria-advisory-issued/70781843007/



Link to info on alert - https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/2023/han00497.asp
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Health advisory issued for rare bacterial infection that has claimed the lives of a dozen Americans (Original Post) BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 OP
Just the beginning. Think. Again. Sep 2023 #1
The ocean water temps off the coast of NJ BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #2
Dangerous rip currents along Atlantic coast spur rescues, at least 3 deaths question everything Sep 2023 #11
Yeah BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #14
In Florida, seven have already died from this flesh eating bacteria. ancianita Sep 2023 #3
Yeah BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #4
The Gulf and hot Atlantic are washing even more toward shores with Lee heading east to the Bahamas. ancianita Sep 2023 #5
I'm watching Lee closely BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #7
Thank you. So far it's only moving at 14 mph, and if it doesn't swing northward, should ancianita Sep 2023 #8
14 mph is pretty "rapid" for a storm that size BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #10
I'll take your word for it; Idalia moved from 13 mph to 35 mph, and I've heard higher mph's ancianita Sep 2023 #21
Once these storms become "post" or "extra" tropical BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #23
Cool! I tracked them in 8th grade, but when NOAA showed up, I felt in better hands. Glad you ancianita Sep 2023 #24
One of my fave trackers is Levi Cowan BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #25
I'm sure he's right. Because El Nino has been a factor in turning Atlantic hurricanes north. ancianita Sep 2023 #26
What is interesting is that back in '89 BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #27
Good lord! First, being in the eye is a creepy cool thing. I went to Dania beach during Betsy as ancianita Sep 2023 #28
... BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #29
Touching lyrics. ancianita Sep 2023 #30
And a true story BumRushDaShow Sep 2023 #31
Thank you. So far it's only moving at 14 mph, and if it doesn't swing northward, should ancianita Sep 2023 #15
Just another benefit from global warming Farmer-Rick Sep 2023 #6
Welp, laying blame doesn't help folks prepare. It just distracts. There's a lot wrong with ancianita Sep 2023 #9
I actually didn't blame anyone Farmer-Rick Sep 2023 #12
I have to disagree... Think. Again. Sep 2023 #13
Sure it's important. But not to those undergoing the actual loss, harm and damage caused by ancianita Sep 2023 #16
Absolutely... Think. Again. Sep 2023 #18
The problem, again, is that ancianita Sep 2023 #19
How about "we"... Think. Again. Sep 2023 #20
How about the "we" who I've already given examples of. ancianita Sep 2023 #22
What global warming? Grins Sep 2023 #17

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
2. The ocean water temps off the coast of NJ
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 07:40 AM
Sep 2023

are literally in the 80s - like bathwater!



So I can imagine what the temps are for inland waterways like ponds, lakes and rivers where this can flourish.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
14. Yeah
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:58 AM
Sep 2023

What was left from Idalia had been spinning around out there for a long time and it has drifted north again and is smacking up against Nova Scotia at the moment.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
3. In Florida, seven have already died from this flesh eating bacteria.
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 08:18 AM
Sep 2023

With or without open wounds, I'm not hitting the beach until at least November or December. Maybe not even then.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
4. Yeah
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 08:35 AM
Sep 2023

I think some of that is what triggered this and especially since the warmer water (and the bacteria) has migrated further north.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
5. The Gulf and hot Atlantic are washing even more toward shores with Lee heading east to the Bahamas.
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 09:15 AM
Sep 2023

Hope it swings northward, but NOAA hasn't tracked its path in that direction. September hurricanes aren't common but back in the day I'd been through a couple in September when schools shut down.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
7. I'm watching Lee closely
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 09:40 AM
Sep 2023

as the long term models (specifically the GFS) last week, had been honking about something spinning up and approaching somewhere between Sept. 12 - Sept 17 (the animated of the below is showing a coastal miss but we will see as they get more data over the rest of the week).



A possible future "Margot" is brewing right behind Lee.

Any tropical cyclones can help to stir up the colder water that sinks deep in the oceans and that upwelling can help to cool the surface.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
8. Thank you. So far it's only moving at 14 mph, and if it doesn't swing northward, should
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:13 AM
Sep 2023

make US landfall around eastern Florida sometime next week. Hoping for upwelling soon.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
10. 14 mph is pretty "rapid" for a storm that size
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:36 AM
Sep 2023

If a strong "Bermuda High" sets up, it might not hit FL but could do like what Hurricane Franklin did (but without crossing Hispaniola) - basically become what mets call "a fish storm".

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
21. I'll take your word for it; Idalia moved from 13 mph to 35 mph, and I've heard higher mph's
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 01:34 PM
Sep 2023

for past hurricanes. Nice graphic. I'm hoping for a front that helps it swerve northward at the point of the Bahamas, but NOAA's not showing what you're showing on their 2pm update.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
23. Once these storms become "post" or "extra" tropical
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 02:07 PM
Sep 2023

they can zoom along better and that's because the core isn't as tightly wound and that allows it to move better as the pressure increases and it opens up.

I ran 3 different models that are within range (0Z Euro from overnight, 12Z GFS, and 12Z Canadian) and so far, they are all showing Lee swinging around Bermuda off shore from the east coast. The Ukie only goes out to 144 hours and shows Lee just coming into view at the end of its range. The Globals are also starting to show what will probably be Margot as TD-14 is here.

It's a serious hobby (almost 55 years).

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
24. Cool! I tracked them in 8th grade, but when NOAA showed up, I felt in better hands. Glad you
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 02:15 PM
Sep 2023

use the other system models. That's badass tracking.

I've personally experience four, beginning to end, and now have avoided the latest three since being exiled to Florida. That's my new MO -- not tracking, just watching NOAA, and not toughing it out.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
25. One of my fave trackers is Levi Cowan
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 02:26 PM
Sep 2023

of Tropical Tidbits (he works at the Navy's Joint Typhoon Warning Center).

https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/

He did a video last night before Lee became a hurricane so am waiting to see his latest.



Because of the current atmospheric setup (and particularly due to the El Nino ENSO state that has been evolving since spring that has been pushing a strong subtropical jet stream across the Gulf from west to east), the conditions are currently set up for it to turn to the north at some point. The "at some point" is still up in the air but it generally points to no FL hit and possibly no east coast hit at all except maybe way up in Nova Scotia if some ridges move.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
26. I'm sure he's right. Because El Nino has been a factor in turning Atlantic hurricanes north.
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 02:33 PM
Sep 2023

I'ma check him out. Thanks for his link.

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
27. What is interesting is that back in '89
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 03:05 PM
Sep 2023

when on vacation in Acapulco, I got the pleasure of what was Cat 1 Cosme that literally passed over Acapulco Bay and surrounding area. It knocked the power out at the hotel and there was flooding (particularly on the other side of the mountain ridge) but the eye passed over us overnight which was wild to experience at night as it was stormy and then quiet with the stars out and then stormy again.



Cosme had formed in the Pacific, crossed Mexico, and then the remnants emerged into the GOM where they regenerated and the storm was renamed Allison (tropical storm). Allison made landfall in TX and the remnants eventually made their way to Philly after we returned home, so I experienced it TWICE!



From that point on, NHC made a change where they would no longer "rename" storms that cross between the oceans if it can be shown that they came back to life from remnants.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
28. Good lord! First, being in the eye is a creepy cool thing. I went to Dania beach during Betsy as
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 03:56 PM
Sep 2023

its eye passed over us. Cars on A1A sand blasted silver, and nearby beach burger stands under sand dunes, the roofs barely visible, fish flopping everywhere by the shore. And surfers! It was wild, but after an hour we had to rush back home before getting slammed.

But then you experienced it again in Philly is phenomenal! What a storm experience.

My Northridge, California friend says that when it rains in the valley, locals call it "having some weather."

BumRushDaShow

(128,296 posts)
31. And a true story
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 04:46 PM
Sep 2023

They know about that hurricane in the Virgin Islands (St. Croix) thanks to what he wrote up in a letter to newspaper in New York - https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Hamilton/01-01-02-0042

It's in the National Archives.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
15. Thank you. So far it's only moving at 14 mph, and if it doesn't swing northward, should
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 11:12 AM
Sep 2023

make US landfall around eastern Florida sometime next week. Hoping for upwelling soon.

Farmer-Rick

(10,130 posts)
6. Just another benefit from global warming
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 09:31 AM
Sep 2023

Thank capitalism. If so many Filthy-rich people weren't making such huge piles of money from making the earth unhabitable for human life, mankind could address the problem.

But better to keep a clunky economic system that can't address the destruction of our environment than to change to a more rational economic system. We will all pay for this.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
9. Welp, laying blame doesn't help folks prepare. It just distracts. There's a lot wrong with
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:18 AM
Sep 2023

the country, but when nature strikes, it's life saving & communications & mitigating impact time more than anything else, with sorting out the emissions polluter bad guys later.

Humans aren't rational, they're rationalizers.

Farmer-Rick

(10,130 posts)
12. I actually didn't blame anyone
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:46 AM
Sep 2023

I said to thank them.

Follow the money. The filthy-rich capitalist are making huge amounts from selling fossil fuels. We can't just stop this minute even though, we did it for a pandemic. Who really needs humanity to keep buying fossil fuels?

So go thank a filthy-rich capitalist, especially those in the fossil fuels industry, for all the wonders of global warming.

Think. Again.

(7,761 posts)
13. I have to disagree...
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 10:48 AM
Sep 2023

...it's extremely important to identify and address the main drivers of the ecological destruction that are causing all this harm.

It's not only good, but also right to keep constant, focused attention on the problem-makers and to discuss ways we can 'mitigate' the root causes of the difficulties that are being thrust upon us.

In short, it isn't "nature" that is striking, it's actual people doing actual selfish things that is wreaking havoc with nature.

We have a responsibility to stop them.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
16. Sure it's important. But not to those undergoing the actual loss, harm and damage caused by
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 11:20 AM
Sep 2023

nature. They just need life saving shelter, food, and maybe relocation help.

Remember Texas? Democrats suffered, and maybe died, IIRC, when TX leadership failed to hold the negligent corporate electrical companies responsible for Texans' deaths over a couple of winters.

So if we take responsibility to do mass cleanup and restore regions damaged by nature, and at the same time take responsibility to prove which entities are responsible for it, I agree with you, and say go for it and good luck.

Think. Again.

(7,761 posts)
18. Absolutely...
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 12:01 PM
Sep 2023

These human-caused disasters affect all of us, either directly, depending on what and where is happening at any given moment, or indirectly as all of us not in this moment's particular line of fire do all we can to help those who are and they help us when it's our turn.

Through it all, we must all also do everything we can to stop the people who willfully cause these problems just so they can get more money.

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
19. The problem, again, is that
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 12:36 PM
Sep 2023

it's the "directly or indirectly" we have to prove. How does the DOJ go about investigating loss, harm and damage by polluters of air and water when Earth dynamics are also in the mix? That right there makes "who they are" impossible to pinpoint.

Can we make any connections that prove who is even "indirectly" responsible for the heatup of the oceans that cause hurricanes and cyclones? I seriously doubt it, and the polluters absolutely know we can't.

We have Big Tech doing business IN China, being breached/hacked IN China, and yet they stay for the profit, instead of being forced to return home to the U.S. They are indirectly causing aggressive Chinese hacking of our ambassadors and commerce department heads, but how do we prove it unless we demand they stand before Special Counsel grand juries and Congress to explain why they continually do business with an official hostile foreign country.

There is no legal fix for corporations that put us in national security danger. There is no "we" who will get out there and a) call them back to their home country, and b) hold them accountable to their home country.

One early example of how "we" fought Big Tech -- take the IBM PC:
IBM was a big, abusive monopoly long before tech monopolies like Apple and Google were in vogue. The company was tightly integrated with the US military and govt, and this afforded it a measure of security. Even though its rivals griped to Congress about its slamming them, the company fended off serious regulatory action for decades thanks to powerful friends in the Pentagon and other parts of the US apparatus.

Eventually IBM's luck ran out when in 1970, the DOJ opened up an antitrust case on it. Because IBM was a monopoly it had a LOT of money. Over the next 12 years, IBM outspent the entire Dept of Justice Antitrust Division, every year, in a war that came to be called the "antitrust Vietnam." IBM won. Sorta. 12 yrs later the Reagan admin. decided to drop the enforcement action and broke up AT&T instead, because it was so entwined with the US govt (as if IBM wasn't) and "politically" looked like breaking it up was like making govt smaller.

Then IBM backed off because the high-stakes battle with the US govt changed IBM and blunted its predatory instincts. IBM began to second-guess its commercial plans, steering clear of the kinds of things that the DOJ frowned upon. The DOJ didn't like it when a big company monopolized the parts of its products, so IBM made a PC that used commodity parts -- the kind that any manufacturer could buy on the open market. The DOJ didn't like it when companies tied their software to their hardware, so IBM decided not to make its own PC operating system. IBM's chair asked a friend on United Way's board if she knew anyone who could provide an OS for his company's PC. Her name was Mary Gates, and her son, Bill Gates, had a company that fit the bill: Micro-Soft (they dropped the hyphen later). Long story short -- today, IBM no longer even makes PCs.

This should give you an idea of who can make corporations play fair with consumers BUT how long that can actually take. How at scale expensive it is. The "we" who enforce our national security interests have to spend years corralling these Big Corps to do the right thing. And yes, they outspend us in the battles.

Since 9/11 we've been in a labeled a "battleground," and recently the US has been declared in a "state of emergency." But one wouldn't know it, with the govt's complacency about American Big Tech's shenanigans in China, and nevermind the other multinational polluters of oceans and air.

My point: all of this is much easier to say than to do.

In the meantime, we're behind the regulation curve, as Congress doesnt' even know enough to do investigative mop up. So yeah, we need a "we" to focus on preventing disasters while Congress trifles with our tax money and budget. Because the "we" that we have right now doesn't seem to be looking ahead at possible security disasters, nevermind natural disasters.

Think. Again.

(7,761 posts)
20. How about "we"...
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 01:07 PM
Sep 2023

...and by we I mean all of us- DOJ, legislators, consumers, discussion board members, etc, ...how about we all do everything we can to call out those people who do harm for profit and try our best to hold them accountable?

ancianita

(35,922 posts)
22. How about the "we" who I've already given examples of.
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 01:43 PM
Sep 2023

"We" changed to "all of us"? And what would "everything we can" look like. Just calling out? What would that do.

As I've already said, easier said than done.

And as I implied above, at length, we are past the years of 'public awareness' building. "We" have talked our brains out. Won court cases beyond any reasonable doubts. Collected evidence, got 91 felony counts against a former occupant of the WH.
It's one reason why most Americans know the score (besides from direct experience). The "we" you speak of has done its job.

It's the doing time now. THAT is the "we" I'm referring to. The we who can but does not DO.
The same "we" I've described above, who sit in halls of power and accountability and STILL haven't done enough focusing beyond their next election to "hold" even themselves accountable.

Add to that the fact that the 'we' you refer to, has to right now pay attention to too much that's performative bullshit -- like one party that's threatening to shut govt down.

You and I are talking past each other, Think.
So let's just say we agree that not enough is being done at scale by whoever should be earning what we pay them to do (as Nancy would say, "for the children" ).

If you think we should have an official statement from DU to the people that you list, try something new to swivel their heads. Because legislators need help legislating. Consumers are busy earning to consume, or even just get food, housing and real health care that cares. Discussion board members discuss.
The focus here should be on Who is REALLY in a position to DO what you say in a country that's in a perpetual "state of emergency."

Letters and petitions have been proven not to work. Those are out. We've done phone calls and left messages. That's not working well enough, though it's said to be the "most impactful" means of communicating. I'm not prioritizing this to deal with, but I appreciate that you want to.



Grins

(7,181 posts)
17. What global warming?
Thu Sep 7, 2023, 11:53 AM
Sep 2023

Amiright?

It's the little things like this that damage us, and bring on billions of dollars in trying to control it.

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