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Sat Dec 24, 2011, 05:17 AM

Mass boycott leads to awkward silence at UN Kim tribute

December 24, 2011
The Age


NEW YORK: The United States, Japan, South Korea and most leading European countries have boycotted a minute's silence at the United Nations General Assembly for North Korea's late leader, Kim Jong-il.

Australia's representative was in the General Assembly during the tribute.

The tribute, demanded by North Korea, was the highest-profile international move yet sought by the government in Pyongyang in its quest for global recognition for the hardline leader, who died last Saturday at the age of 69.

The awkward silence was a ''protocol'' move following a North Korean request, according to the UN General Assembly president, Nassir Abdulaziz al-Nasser.



Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/world/mass-boycott-leads-to-awkward-silence-at-un-kim-tribute-20111223-1p8la.html#ixzz1hRhziGFc

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Reply Mass boycott leads to awkward silence at UN Kim tribute (Original post)
Violet_Crumble Dec 2011 OP
Quantess Dec 2011 #1
dipsydoodle Dec 2011 #2
24601 Dec 2011 #4
Posteritatis Dec 2011 #6
David__77 Dec 2011 #7
Spider Jerusalem Dec 2011 #9
David__77 Dec 2011 #10
Posteritatis Dec 2011 #11
Spider Jerusalem Dec 2011 #12
Bodhi BloodWave Dec 2011 #3
Kalidurga Dec 2011 #5
noamnety Dec 2011 #8
philly_bob Dec 2011 #13

Response to Violet_Crumble (Original post)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 06:11 AM

1. after reading the article

it looks like everything about kim jong il has inspired awkward reactions.

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Response to Violet_Crumble (Original post)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 06:54 AM

2. Perhaps NK will remind the US and the others

of this childish act when negotiations are next due to occur.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Reply #2)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 09:02 AM

4. How would you handle a tribute proposed for Hitler or Stalin? n/t

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Response to 24601 (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 03:15 PM

6. A minute's applause, maybe. (nt)

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Response to 24601 (Reply #4)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:06 PM

7. Eisenhower gave condolences on Stalin's death

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=2506&dat=19530306&id=PyVaAAAAIBAJ&sjid=7UsNAAAAIBAJ&pg=4051,1373131

These are diplomatic things. Obviously, the US was at war with Germany when Hitler died, and so there was celebration of Hitler's death. The US was not at war with the Soviet Union, and in fact were allied during the greatest of all wars.

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Response to David__77 (Reply #7)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:27 PM

9. And so did Churchill

but offering condolences isn't quite the same thing as demanding a minute's silence at the UN, either. It's diplomatic to tender condolences at such a time, to a nation that's lost a leader, yes; it's singularly undiplomatic, and in fact shockingly bad form, to demand tributes. Boycotting this was, I'm afraid, the right thing to do.

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Response to Spider Jerusalem (Reply #9)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:34 PM

10. The minute silence is a fairly normal UN protocol for leaders who die in office.

Boycotting the session was unnecessary. And actually it brings forth the fact that "the West" is a minority in the world: Russia, China, India, Brazil, South Africa, Egypt, Indonesia, etc., are the large and growing majority of the world population. Let's try to find accord if possible.

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Response to David__77 (Reply #10)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:38 PM

11. Two thirds of the UN membership boycotted this, not just "the West." (nt)

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Response to David__77 (Reply #10)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:42 PM

12. Not as far as I am aware generally accorded to dictators.

Nor demanded by the deceased's own country. As I say, poor form.

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Response to Violet_Crumble (Original post)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 07:22 AM

3. hmm, a fairly petty move i must say to boycott

Hopefully Norway wasn't one of the boycotters, if we were then I'm disappointed in our representative

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Response to Violet_Crumble (Original post)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 02:17 PM

5. Really this is the best we can do...

boycott a tribute for a mass murderer? North Korea needs a lot more than a boycott.

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Response to Kalidurga (Reply #5)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 04:13 PM

8. as do we.

 

The situation is awkward, eh?

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Response to Violet_Crumble (Original post)

Sat Dec 24, 2011, 05:13 PM

13. I would have been silent, but without standing up or bowing my head.

I remember I was copy editor of a student newspaper when J.Edgar Hoover died. Someone wrote a critical editorial about his death. I wrote the equally critical headline "Good Riddance to a Bad Man" and the writer got really mad at me.

You don't crow publicly over someone's death.

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