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Boeing 787 does near vertical takeoff! Cool video (Original Post) jimlup Jun 2015 OP
That is such a cool looking airplane sharp_stick Jun 2015 #1
As a somewhat nervous flyer, I find videos like this (as well as the more extreme petronius Jun 2015 #2
I flew Vietnam Airlines in the mid-80s mainer Jun 2015 #5
Those old Ilyshins were scary planes DFW Jun 2015 #11
But can it barrel roll? liberaltrucker Jun 2015 #3
Only if ol' Tex Johnston was flying it! Cooley Hurd Jun 2015 #8
My favorite quote of his regarding that incident; A HERETIC I AM Jun 2015 #15
If only he poured tea during it... Cooley Hurd Jun 2015 #17
Man, they sure don't make test pilots like they used to. liberaltrucker Jun 2015 #21
A different video with profile of that steep takeoff mainer Jun 2015 #4
Very cool! Thanks jimlup Jun 2015 #6
for the low low everyday price of about $150,000,000... ProdigalJunkMail Jun 2015 #16
I don't know about this... jmowreader Jun 2015 #7
wow. that was impressive. Russian pilots also take off damn near vertically ... Flaxbee Jun 2015 #9
The Dreamliner has a triple redundant control system Major Nikon Jun 2015 #14
I knew they had redundancies - to do otherwise would be negligent - but Flaxbee Jun 2015 #18
I'm not that familiar with how it works Major Nikon Jun 2015 #20
I'm guessing that would not be possible with a full load of passengers and cargo. Baitball Blogger Jun 2015 #10
A friend of mine took one from here (Germany) to Japan recently DFW Jun 2015 #12
Way too cool! avebury Jun 2015 #13
Cool Veldrick Jun 2015 #19

sharp_stick

(14,400 posts)
1. That is such a cool looking airplane
Fri Jun 12, 2015, 08:45 AM
Jun 2015

I had one go over the house a couple of weeks ago and it's distinctive even from below.

I've become addicted to the PlaneFinder app, heading outside to look up whenever I see a 787, 747-800 or A380 fly over.

petronius

(26,571 posts)
2. As a somewhat nervous flyer, I find videos like this (as well as the more extreme
Fri Jun 12, 2015, 10:39 AM
Jun 2015

testing videos) to be reassuring - seeing what a modern plane is really capable of and able to cope with puts the choppy air and occasional shaky descent into perspective.

Although I worry a bit for the reputation of Vietnam Airlines: after this floats around the web long enough it will probably end up being labeled as their standard takeoff behavior...

mainer

(12,006 posts)
5. I flew Vietnam Airlines in the mid-80s
Fri Jun 12, 2015, 11:25 AM
Jun 2015

It was an Ilyushin and instead of an escape slide, they had an escape ROPE. I kid you not. Thank god we never had to use it.

DFW

(53,791 posts)
11. Those old Ilyshins were scary planes
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 11:56 AM
Jun 2015

I flew one back in the 1980s--well, two, actually, since the first one fell apart in flight and was "lucky to get back down in one piece" according to the airport staff. The second one finally got me to where I wanted to go, albeit 8 hours late. It was an IL-62, the Soviet copy of the old British Vicount-10. WHY anyone would WANT to copy the VC-10 remains a mystery to me.

 

Cooley Hurd

(26,877 posts)
8. Only if ol' Tex Johnston was flying it!
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 08:20 AM
Jun 2015
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alvin_M._Johnston

<snip>

Johnston is best known for performing a barnstormer-style barrel-roll maneuver with Boeing's pioneering 367-80 jet in a demonstration flight over Lake Washington outside Seattle, on August 7, 1955.[5] The maneuver was caught on film and was frequently shown on the Discovery Wings cable channel in a three-minute short as part of the Touched by History series, while the channel still aired. Called before the then-president of Boeing, Bill Allen, for rolling the airplane, Johnston was asked what he thought he was doing, and responded with "I was selling airplanes". He kept his position as a test pilot, and did not get in legal trouble for his actions. Along with his cowboy style of dress, such maverick behavior is said to have inspired the creation of Dr. Strangelove's Maj. T.J. "King" Kong character, who, in rodeo style, rode a balky nuclear weapon to its target.

</snip>

A HERETIC I AM

(24,289 posts)
15. My favorite quote of his regarding that incident;
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 01:52 PM
Jun 2015

"I put it in a 1 G roll. The airplane never knew it was upside down!"


mainer

(12,006 posts)
4. A different video with profile of that steep takeoff
Fri Jun 12, 2015, 11:23 AM
Jun 2015

Wow. Those wings are gorgeous -- makes me think of a dragon's wings.

&feature=youtu.be

(I assume the videos were taken with drones?)

jmowreader

(50,360 posts)
7. I don't know about this...
Fri Jun 12, 2015, 08:45 PM
Jun 2015

If I was that worried about surface-to-air missile fire, I'd rethink my plans to buy Dreamliners - they'd be better off with a fleet of nice pre-owned 767s that won't put as big a dent in the national exchequer if one gets shot down.

Flaxbee

(13,661 posts)
9. wow. that was impressive. Russian pilots also take off damn near vertically ...
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 11:17 AM
Jun 2015

just the way they fly, commercial or otherwise.

That being said, I HATE "fly by wire" planes - there are no manual controls on the new planes, as far as I know. One strong EMP (say, if the sun burps) or computer fail (redundancies too) and you can't control the wings. Used to be you could go back to the middle of the plane, open a hatch and manually control the flaps. Not any more.

Major Nikon

(36,812 posts)
14. The Dreamliner has a triple redundant control system
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 01:06 PM
Jun 2015

Two use electric motors connected to the control surfaces and one is hydraulic. "Manual" controls aren't bulletproof. They typically had no redundancy and if a steel cable gets cut you are SOL.

New smaller planes still use steel cable controls, but they aren't practical on very large jets.

Flaxbee

(13,661 posts)
18. I knew they had redundancies - to do otherwise would be negligent - but
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 04:20 PM
Jun 2015

what happens if the computer craps out or is hacked or there is an EMP? How does it all work together? In other words, if computer systems fail, can the plane - esp the heavies - still be flown?

Major Nikon

(36,812 posts)
20. I'm not that familiar with how it works
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 04:47 PM
Jun 2015

However, I don't think it could pass certification unless it has at least 2 fully redundant systems, meaning there's no single point of failure than can take it down. Control systems are the most vital component of the aircraft. I don't know if the hydraulic system even has a computer control as it wouldn't be necessary. While there have been a few instances were failures have taken down an aircraft, newer designs take those failures into consideration and engineer those weak points out.

DFW

(53,791 posts)
12. A friend of mine took one from here (Germany) to Japan recently
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 12:00 PM
Jun 2015

He said it was fine. Of course, it's always fine if you land safely!

Starting September, we get nonstop service from here (Düsseldorf) to Hong Kong on Cathay Pacific. Not that it's ideal for a long weekend, but if the fares aren't horrendous, I might be able to drag Mrs. DFW off for a week in Kowloon.....

avebury

(10,938 posts)
13. Way too cool!
Sat Jun 13, 2015, 12:49 PM
Jun 2015

I remember years ago we changed flights in Pittsburg (I think but am not sure). Our departing flight seem to make a really steep take off that was a little jarring for those not expecting it.

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