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Fri Aug 22, 2014, 10:43 AM

Poverty Is Not Inevitable: What We Can Do Now to Turn Things Around

Poverty Is Not Inevitable: What We Can Do Now to Turn Things Around

Having poor people in the richest country in the world is a choice. We have the money to solve this. But do we have the will?
by Dean Paton
posted Aug 21, 2014

Inequality and poverty are suddenly hot topics, not only in the United States but also across the globe. Since the early 1980s, there has been a growing underclass in America. At the same time a much smaller class, now called the superrich, built its wealth to levels of opulence not seen since France’s Louis XVI. Despite this, the resulting inequality went mostly unnoticed. When the Great Recession of 2008 hit, and the division between the very wealthy and the rest of us came starkly into focus, various people and groups, including the Occupy movement, began insisting more publicly that we tax wealth. But still, helping the poor has been mostly a discussion on the fringes. At last, the terms of public debate have changed, because inequality and poverty now are debated regularly in the mainstream media and across the political spectrum, not solely by labor, by the left, and by others imagining a new economy.

Inserting such a controversial topic into mainstream discourse is French economist Thomas Piketty. His 700-page tome, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, shocked everyone this year when it made The New York Times bestseller list and bookstores found themselves backordering an economics book for legions of eager readers. Piketty did exhaustive searches of tax records from Great Britain, France, and the United States, going as far back as the late 18th century in France. Using sophisticated computer modeling and analyses, the professor from the Paris School of Economics debunks a long-held assumption—that income from wages will tend to grow at roughly the same rate as wealth—and instead makes a compelling case that, over time, the apparatus of capitalism grows wealth faster than wages. Result: Inequality between the wealthy and everyone else will widen faster and faster; and, without progressive taxation, his data show we’ll return to levels of inequality not seen since America’s Gilded Age.

Piketty, no Marxist, says a solution lies in a “confiscatory” tax on wealth: Tax salaries over $500,000 at 80 percent worldwide, and tax wealth at 15 percent worldwide. Every year.

Unless we can reverse the inequality trends of the past 35 years, Piketty says, the ensuing social chaos will eventually destroy democracy. Unfortunately, not even Piketty sees much chance of all nations on Earth simultaneously enacting his tax plans ...

more here: http://www.yesmagazine.org/issues/the-end-of-poverty/why-poverty-is-not-inevitable

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Reply Poverty Is Not Inevitable: What We Can Do Now to Turn Things Around (Original post)
TBF Aug 2014 OP
Demeter Aug 2014 #1
TBF Aug 2014 #2
Demeter Aug 2014 #3

Response to TBF (Original post)

Fri Aug 22, 2014, 11:45 AM

1. You need permission of the 1%

 

or...elimination of the 1%....it's their choice, and I think we can see what they have chosen...

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Response to Demeter (Reply #1)

Fri Aug 22, 2014, 03:30 PM

2. I'm of the opinion that

they will not concede their power willingly. I'd love to be wrong.

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Response to TBF (Reply #2)

Fri Aug 22, 2014, 06:32 PM

3. It would be cheaper, and more civilized

 

which is why it's unlikely.

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