HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Entertainment » Music Appreciation (Group) » Happy 74th birthday, Doug...

Tue May 28, 2019, 12:09 PM

Happy 74th birthday, Doug Rhodes, of the Music Machine.

Doug Rhodes

Doug Rhodes, (born May 28, 1945) multi-instrumentalist, performed with 1960s rock bands the Music Machine and the Millennium.

Growing up in Garden Grove, California, Rhodes began his music career as a jazz saxophonist at the age of 16, playing with older brother Robbie Rhodes. Eventually, he became the member of a band called The Spats, for whom he played organ. He was kicked out of the band late in 1965. After moving to L.A. in January 1966, Rhodes met producer Curt Boettcher, who got him work as a studio musician. He played celeste for the Association's No. 1 hit "Cherish".

In the summer of 1966, Rhodes joined the rock band the Music Machine, for whom he primarily played the organ and provided backing vocals. After the release of the band's first LP, (Turn On) The Music Machine, and a promotional tour, four of the five members, including Rhodes, quit the group, leaving only singer/songwriter Sean Bonniwell. According to Rhodes, there was conflict over money and Bonniwell's attitude toward the other members. Bonniwell continued to use the band name and released a second album mostly of older recordings on which Rhodes had performed.

There are many videos of Music Machine songs at DU already. Here's my favorite. I had forgotten the title. It took me a while to find it. Good old Google. It sounds odd, like some artificially generated stereo.



PSYCHOGARAGE
Published on Dec 28, 2014

THE MUSIC MACHINE - THE PEOPLE IN ME
ALBUM (Turn On) The Music Machine (1966)

The Music Machine (19651969) was an American garage rock and psychedelic (sometimes referred to as garage punk) band from the late 1960s, headed by singer-songwriter Sean Bonniwell and based in Los Angeles. The band sound was often defined by fuzzy guitars and a Farfisa organ. Their original look consisted of all-black clothing, (dyed) black moptop hairstyles and a single black glove.The group came together as The Ragamuffins in 1965, but became The Music Machine in 1966. In addition to Bonniwell, the original line-up consisted of Ron Edgar (drums), Mark Landon (guitar), Keith Olsen (bass), and Doug Rhodes (organ).

Hey, Halright

Sometimes dreamin'
I'm in here schemin' on you

Collectin' headers
With nothin' better to do

Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.

When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do

When you see the people in me
Minus you it's overdue

While I'm cryin
I'm rectifyin' the cause
Friends are cheerin'
And I'm hearin' applause

The train is here you better run
Don't call me I'll never come
Unto you
They're over now the games you play
Just what you'll do, just what you'll say
Uh oh you

Middle

Memory is everywhere
Love and you is in my hair
And eyes
Maybe with the time and place
A look will come upon your face
Of surprise.

When you see the people in me
Minus you what will you do

When you see the people in me
Minus you it's overdue

Hut, Halright



MUNROWS RETRO
Published on Aug 29, 2015

One of the first rock albums I ever purchased was " (Turn On) The Music Machine " in 1967, along with the original "The Hollies Greatest Hits" (compiled prior to the release of their '67 hit single "Carrie Anne" which was not on it, although it is on later re-issues). The album was an amazing selection of garage rock, psychedelic rock, rock ballads similar to those being done by The Doors ( "Come On In" ), and covers of pop hits like Neil Diamond's hit "Cherry Cherry" and Jimi Hendrix's "Hey Joe." Concerning "Hey Joe" the group's leader and music composer, the late Sean Bonniwell (d. 2011), said he had the original option to record the song, but was snubbed due to a feud between the band's manager and a top record executive.

To me Bonniwell's distinctively masculine vocal style inspired others to copy him, such as Arthur Lee of Love and Doug Ingle of Iron Butterfly. Indeed, I could never listen to an Iron Butterfly album without thinking of Boniwell's deep, masterful rock vocals. This album, and the Hollies album, got played A LOT by me, yet never really got all that scratched up. Unfortunately, a friend of mine borrowed both of them and later moved to Florida. When he returned 17 years later, he said he didn't know what happened to the LPs. Thank goodness for digital.

The Music Machine had two hit singles, "Talk Talk" which peaked at #15 on Billboard on January 14, 1967 (#21 on Cash Box, December 31, 1966), and this song, "The People In Me," which peaked at #66 on Billboard, but at only #79 on Cash Box on March 4, 1967. The Cash Box position is a bit of a surprise as usually lower-placed songs charted higher on Cash Box than on Billboard, sometimes a lot higher. "The People In Me" was a much more danceable song than "Talk Talk" with an unusual, frenzied, Eastern-sounding lead guitar. It is doubtful fans of the group much cared how high or low the song charted as it was a quite popular club number at that time. Call it what you will, garage rock, psychedelic, or protopunk, once again the time has come to "turn on" to Music Machine's "The People In Me." Enjoy.

2 replies, 398 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 2 replies Author Time Post
Reply Happy 74th birthday, Doug Rhodes, of the Music Machine. (Original post)
mahatmakanejeeves May 2019 OP
50 Shades Of Blue May 2019 #1
Floyd R. Turbo May 2019 #2


Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 12:48 PM

2. Saw them several times in/around L.A.✌🏻

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread