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Wed Apr 14, 2021, 08:38 AM

Male belted kingfisher

These birds are quite difficult to photograph since they rarely sit still for longer than a second! Small shot due to major cropping.

17 replies, 2413 views

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Arrow 17 replies Author Time Post
Reply Male belted kingfisher (Original post)
birdographer Apr 2021 OP
Diamond_Dog Apr 2021 #1
birdographer Apr 2021 #3
AndyS Apr 2021 #2
birdographer Apr 2021 #4
marble falls Apr 2021 #5
ret5hd Apr 2021 #8
niyad Apr 2021 #6
Cracklin Charlie Apr 2021 #7
birdographer Apr 2021 #12
Beastly Boy Apr 2021 #9
birdographer Apr 2021 #13
Beastly Boy Apr 2021 #16
AllaN01Bear Apr 2021 #10
scarytomcat Apr 2021 #11
2naSalit Apr 2021 #14
BobTheSubgenius Apr 2021 #15
George McGovern Apr 2021 #17

Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:01 AM

1. Handsome bird! Well done!

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Response to Diamond_Dog (Reply #1)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:02 AM

3. Thanks!

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:02 AM

2. I've noticed that the smaller the bird the more it moves.

Large raptors, egrets and herons are petty easy as they move slowly and I have time to anticipate what happens next. As the size and inertia decrease the energy and motion increase. A black capped chickadee is never in one place for more than half a second and they don't even obey the law of gravity; as likely to land on the bottom of the branch as the top. Guess that's why the engineers developed burst mode! Spray and pray as it were and then spend more time discarding the mostly empty frames than actually taking pictures!

Oh, forgot to mention, excellent picture. The slightly open beak gives a sense of anticipation to the pose.

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Response to AndyS (Reply #2)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:06 AM

4. Exactly

I tend much more toward long-legged shorebirds, but this was quite a catch. These little guys make a chipping noise as they zoom over water, and then disappear into trees. Frustration on wings for a photographer!

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:31 AM

5. Male belted kingfisher. But what did the Kingfisher do to the male first?

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Response to marble falls (Reply #5)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:53 AM

8. Mocked his hairdo?

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:45 AM

6. Way cool!

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 09:53 AM

7. I noticed your name.

Iíve been trying to identify a little bird that I saw several years ago. So far, Iím coming up empty.

Wanna give it a go?

It was a really hot day in NW Missouri. I saw a little bird sitting in my ficus tree on the deck for a long time. A closer look revealed a cute little black bird, possibly juvenile, black all over, with a bright red spot on each ďcheekĒ. That was the only coloring that I could see. He sat there for a long time, I turned on a sprinkler, so he could get water. About an hour later, he was gone.

Iíve been trying to identify him for at least 10 years. Iíve tried woodpeckers, blackbirds, wrens, and sparrows. I would love to know what it was.

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Response to Cracklin Charlie (Reply #7)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 11:16 AM

12. No idea!

Wish I could help, you'd almost have to go through a bird book page by page for US birds. The problem is the possibility of being a juvenile. they change a lot sometimes as they mature.

The name comes from photographing birds, not so much identifying. Sorry I'm no help!

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 10:14 AM

9. Not that Iam disappointed, but after reading the header, I was expecting something along these lines



Sometimes, being wrong is pretty gratifying.

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Response to Beastly Boy (Reply #9)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 11:21 AM

13. Ooops

I didn't expect much attention to this post except from birders who spotted it in the Photography group. I probably should have left the "male" off, it's a bit misleading in a subject...

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Response to birdographer (Reply #13)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 12:18 PM

16. No, your header is perfect. Keeps people guessing. That's half the fun.

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 10:41 AM

10. lovely shot of a lovely bird . eggscllent.

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 10:57 AM

11. beautiful bird and shot

thanks

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 11:21 AM

14. They really are hard to capturein a still...

I have many failed attempts to claim. Very nice.

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 12:16 PM

15. We don't have birds quite that exotic, but we sure enjoy the ones we do have.

And it's quite a variety. Wrens, swallows, chickadees, a small variety of woodpeckers, hummingbirds, common redpolls, and sparrows, all of whom feed here. We have these wild evergreen shrubs that are quite attractive, rather like rhodos, but smaller leaves and tiny, almost insignificant flowers.

There is a small "grove" of them, into which we've placed a big, shallow bowl that we keep full of clean water, and a "gnome home", where some of them are nesting. It's nice to watch them flit around in their own little "forest." It's quite safe, at least as safe as small birds can be in the "wild" and they are obviously very happy there.

Of course there are crows, and they are their own form of entertainment. Our Cairn just HATES them and goes into a frenzy at times. A couple of the crows seem to make it their business to annoy him, flitting back and forth diagonally at random intervals, sitting safely on either side or back fence and watching Ozzie.

A couple of times, we've seen one of them breaking off twigs and "throwing" them at him by whipping his head in an arc and letting go of the twig. That is particularly annoying to the dog.

The other day, one of them might have "one-punched" a squirrel into its "grave" by swooping down from one of the trees and giving it one mighty peck on the head with its momentum behind it for getting too close to the nest. It fell onto the other side of the fence into densish foliage and we lost sight of it.

It's our own little Wild Kingdom.

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Response to birdographer (Original post)

Wed Apr 14, 2021, 11:23 PM

17. Beautiful birdographer! Even with the cropping! Excellent composition!

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