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Sat Jan 11, 2014, 10:10 PM

 

Oregon #1 in nation for inbound moving rate.

This Map Shows Which States Americans Are Moving To And Leaving
ROB WILE
JAN. 9, 2014, 9:57 AM 224,202 56


United Van Lines recently published its inbound and outbound moving data for the U.S. (This is different from the map from Atlas Van Lines we published last week, which actually shows slightly different data).

Seth Kadish at Vizual Statistix has compiled the data into a spectacular map that captures the migration flows.

It looks at which states had the greatest share of inbound moves as a percent of total moves.

The winners: Oregon and the Carolinas.

The losers: New Jersey, Illinois, and New York

Check it out:

united moving map




Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/2013-moving-map-2014-1#ixzz2q9M54eCq

19 replies, 4187 views

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply Oregon #1 in nation for inbound moving rate. (Original post)
ErikJ Jan 2014 OP
defacto7 Jan 2014 #1
grasswire Jan 2014 #2
defacto7 Jan 2014 #3
grasswire Jan 2014 #4
defacto7 Jan 2014 #5
love_katz Jan 2014 #6
classof56 Jan 2014 #7
0rganism Feb 2014 #11
defacto7 Feb 2014 #13
0rganism Feb 2014 #15
defacto7 Feb 2014 #17
shedevil69taz Jan 2014 #8
grasswire Jan 2014 #9
quakerboy Jan 2014 #10
0rganism Feb 2014 #12
defacto7 Feb 2014 #16
0rganism Feb 2014 #18
defacto7 Feb 2014 #14
Lydia Leftcoast Feb 2014 #19

Response to ErikJ (Original post)

Sat Jan 11, 2014, 11:06 PM

1. Tom McCall would be pretty pissed.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 11, 2014, 11:24 PM

2. I'm a little pissed myself

Especially when I see what's being done to Portland neighborhoods where out of state developers are razing single family homes and building huge multi-dwellings, ruining the character of the neighborhoods bit by bit.

Time for the city planners to be IMPRESSED by the idea of limited growth instead of what's currently going on.

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Response to grasswire (Reply #2)

Sat Jan 11, 2014, 11:46 PM

3. I absolutely agree...

I am sick of watching outsiders destroying the culture and history of one of the most historic and beautiful cities in America. I have been watching it happen to the entire state since the early 70s. I remember what it was like in the early 60s as a kid living in Laurelhurst and I know the personal history through family back decades earlier. Culture and history seem to be no match for business and money interests gone mad and they are no respecters of human memory, art or advancement.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #3)

Sun Jan 12, 2014, 01:08 AM

4. Laurelhurst is a beautiful, beautiful place.

Some of my happiest childhood memories are of Laurelhurst Park. And of driving across 39th to my grandparents' old craftsman home on Mt. Tabor, on a drizzly evening past Peacock Lane.

I recall trick or treating at the huge mansion just between Burnside and the park. My brother always thought it was a library, it was so gorgeous.

Some family lives in Westmoreland now, and the ruination of that neighborhood is begun. I hate it. Just hate it.

I think there are some grassroots groups opposed to zoning policy. It's just time to stop it. Look what's happening to Division St.!

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Response to grasswire (Reply #4)

Sun Jan 12, 2014, 02:11 AM

5. I used to walk to Laurelhurst park almost every day

by myself or with a friend even when I was 6 years old. Feeding the ducks at the pond was a favorite. My earliest memory of the park was a few weeks before the Columbus Day storm in 62?? The trees were enormous, but after the storm, a bit shorter. I remember playing in the fallen debris.

Mt. Tabor... I miss those reservoir fountains especially the one on Division at Mt Tabor. Now it's condos I think. My brothers an I climbed Mt Tabor every once in a while but only if it was really muddy and never took the paths or stairs. I guess that was the fun of it... and the fact that it was an extinct volcano made it mysterious to this 5-6 year old.

What has really changed? The Columbia gorge and the Mt. Hood Wilderness and surrounding forests. In the 70s I used to hike just about every trail out there from Oxbow to Tanner creek to Larch Mt., Angels and Devils rest and the best of all, Perdition trail which is no more. I would bike to the "The Falls" from school and climb to the top and down before my first class in the morning. I can't even go to Larch Mt. anymore, it's sick what has happened to that area out to Mt. Hood. My memories are just too pristine to foul with what I see now. The same with the drive to and down the coast. The massive forests are gone... all gone. Just some putrid corridors and a lot of clear cut.

Sorry, I could rant about this for hours. My heart is broken over the destruction in and out of town. But I remember all too well.

on edit: It's time to resurrect Tom McCall from the beyond. Oregon needs his kind now. I remember the Entering Oregon sign on 80N (remember 80N) coming in from Idaho... "Welcome to Oregon! Enjoy your visit but don't stay too long or try to get a job here." Tom McCall Governor. He had the attitude.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #5)

Sun Jan 12, 2014, 11:57 PM

6. Yes, we need to resurrect Governor McCall...

or find someone who can channel him.

The downhill slide began in the '60's with the Californication of Oregon.

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Response to love_katz (Reply #6)

Mon Jan 13, 2014, 09:50 PM

7. Tom is my hero.

He once said he loved Oregon more than life. That was not long before he passed away far too soon. He was a great man whose devotion to the preservation of our state knew no bounds. We will not see the likes of him again, but oh, how I'd love to find someone who could channel him. He did Republicans proud. I visited him when he lay in state in the Capitol Rotunda and couldn't help but cry. His legacy will live on to the benefit of Oregonians for all time to come. Or let us hope so!

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #3)

Mon Feb 3, 2014, 11:32 PM

11. i used to live in Laurelhurst, my house (ca 1925) had a rider attached to the deed...

...that said the house could not be sold to "coloreds". Some of that precious history and culture ain't so pretty. i bet a lot of the neighbors back in the '50s and '60s weren't so hot on the "outsiders" moving in and "destroying the culture" then either.

Just sayin'.

Personally, i think high-density housing of the kind put in around 34th and Belmont added a lot to that community.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #11)

Mon Feb 3, 2014, 11:54 PM

13. "Some of that precious history and culture ain't so pretty."

...and so goes the story of most of America in 1925. We both know those standards don't hold in modern deed laws. Racism can be found in many historic documents, it's not news nor specific to Laurelhurst or Oregon or even the US.

As for your next sentence, feel free to back it up. "I bet" and "just sayin'" means there's nothing there.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #13)

Tue Feb 4, 2014, 12:26 AM

15. you know, i could take plenty of issue with your semantics too

but i'm not going to do that. As for backing it up, try this article on the Vanport flood of 1948:
http://www.ohs.org/education/oregonhistory/learning_center/dspresource.cfm?resource_ID=000BC26B-EE5A-1E47-AE5A80B05272FE9F

"Originally meant to be temporary, Vanport was shipbuilding-magnate Henry Kaiser’s answer to a lack of local housing in the early days of World War II, when he was importing men and women from across the United States to work in his Portland-area shipyards. At the height of the war in 1944, close to 40,000 people lived in Vanport, including 6,000 African Americans, three times as many as had lived in all of Portland two years before."

Those were African Americans who couldn't buy housing in much of Portland, and according to Oregon's 1st constitution couldn't even have moved into the state. Racist neighborhood covenants like the kind still lingering on my deed when i bought the property in 1994 had the force of law until 1948, and created a pattern of segregation that took decades to begin to undo. That's one cultural heritage i don't find worth preserving.

i could go on about it, but i'd rather not. instead i'll just propose to you that not everything new is negative, not every change and development represents destruction, and some of the people i knew in Laurelhurst who added the most to my experience of the community were probably among those you'd consider "outsiders". i think Mr. James McMurtry sums it up quite nicely:


I'm not from here
But people tell me
It's not like it used to be
They say I should have been here
Back about ten years
Before it got ruined by folks like me

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #15)

Tue Feb 4, 2014, 12:37 AM

17. Oh, where can I sign?

How much do you need to get the project started?

We'll never meet on this. I believe you have no clue.

But, be well.

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Response to grasswire (Reply #2)

Wed Jan 22, 2014, 04:49 AM

8. Would you rather have them build

brand new townhouse complexes on previously wild land? They ARE going to put people somewhere...

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Response to shedevil69taz (Reply #8)

Wed Jan 22, 2014, 07:36 PM

9. wrong

I would rather limit growth. There is no reason for a city like Portland to not manage growth. By "like Portland" I mean the city in the U.S. with the most INflux of new residents. No. 1 in the whole country. If this growth is not managed, the quality of life for most residents (the 99%) will suffer tremendously, eventually.

Just put a cap on new dwellings in the metro area. That's all it takes. Deny the developers and those who want to flip a single family house into a dozen apartments on a single lot, with no parking made available.

Just limit it.

As it is, Portland schools are suffering because the 2-income twenty somethings won't vote for money for quality schools. The beautiful old neighborhoods are suffering because of gentrification and predatory building.

Just limit it. Through the planning and permits processes.

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Response to grasswire (Reply #9)

Thu Jan 23, 2014, 01:55 AM

10. How do you do that?

to fit more people you either have to build up or build out, unless you have some new way that ive never heard of.

More people will come. If the city of Portland denies them places to live, Clackamas, Gresham, Hilsborough, and Vancouver will all happily accommodate them, further congesting and destroying even more of the surrounding areas. These areas are getting seriously wrecked even as is.

Also, It doesn't seem to me your comment re portland schools is fair. To start with, I'm not sure what you are basing your blame of 20 somethings on. In my experience, most of them are very pro school funding, whereas I find more anti sentiment in the "serious" middle age business types. And I can only think of one time in recent history that the vote has gone against funding our schools. Portland is fairly well known for voting yes on school funding measures.

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Response to grasswire (Reply #9)

Mon Feb 3, 2014, 11:48 PM

12. consider the consequences though

At least one of three things happens if we capped metro-area development.
1. The urban growth boundary expands
2. Real estate prices go through the roof (moreso than they do already)
3. People stop moving into Portland

I think we can agree that #3 is quite unlikely, unless something is done to make Portland far less of an urban paradise than it currently is. Do you want that? No? OK, great.

What has happened in the past is a combination of #1 and #2. Metro has slowed expansion of the growth boundary lately, and the less urban development allowed the greater the real estate bubble created. This inflation due to artificial scarcity stands in contrast to real growth in value that can arise from true neighborhood improvements, of which i was fortunate to see plenty while living in Laurelhurst in the '90s. By encouraging in-fill, the city can develop previously undervalued areas and by doing so lead to steady improvements all around for nearby homeowners.

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #12)

Tue Feb 4, 2014, 12:31 AM

16. What?

"I think we can agree that #3 is quite unlikely, unless something is done to make Portland far less of an urban paradise than it currently is. Do you want that? No? OK, great. "

I don't agree with any of your premises nor your tactics, which makes it impossible to agree with any of your points. They are completely contradictory. It's the same repetitive sales pitch you hear in a "I made my first million in real estate before I was six" seminar. So you think you were "fortunate" in the 90s? I guess that's why your view of paradise is so unhinged.

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Response to defacto7 (Reply #16)

Tue Feb 4, 2014, 12:45 AM

18. well then, i think our conversation has come to a rather unpleasant end

It's a pity we couldn't have had a more cordial discussion. I'm sure we agree about many more points than those on which we disagree. However, i find your hostile antagonistic approach increasingly distasteful and will no longer interact with you on this or any other thread, as it wastes my time and quite possibly yours as well. Of all the people on my ignore list, you are the first.

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Response to shedevil69taz (Reply #8)

Tue Feb 4, 2014, 12:11 AM

14. Previously wild land?

There is no "wild" land anymore. That was destroyed long ago. Nothing to save.

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Response to ErikJ (Original post)

Tue Feb 25, 2014, 09:27 PM

19. You know, i am seriuosly considering moving back

I lived in Oregon for 19 years and moved to Minnesota in 2003, partly because my mother and stepfather were old and frail.

They're both gone now, and I find that I not only have trouble with the winters (the coldest since the 1980s--the HIGH on Thursday will be -5°, that MINUS 5) but I also realized that I don't do as much as I did in Portland, which is compact and has some of the best public transit in the country.

Everything in Minneapolis-St. Paul is so spread out. I have to drive to live a full live, and I HATE to drive and resent every dollar I spend on the car.

I can't afford to move anywhere at the moment (I'm a free-lance translator with a variable income), but I'm hoping to make the move before the next winter.

I do know that some things have changed. I was there for a visit in 2011 and found that I still liked it, even though Tri-Met had rerouted everything.

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