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Mon Oct 1, 2018, 03:55 AM

Rare bee discovered at National Butterfly Center

Two nature surveyors this month discovered a red-legged Toluca Leafcutter Bee at the National Butterfly Center in Mission. Itís the first time the bee species has been spotted in the U.S.

The Toluca Leafcutter Bee had been documented in Tamaulipas, Mexico, but American Museum of Natural History bee experts John Ascher and Jack Neff identified it in South Texas through photographs taken by surveyors Paula Sharp and Ross Eatman.

The bee was temporarily captured and released back to its home at the National Butterfly Center.

The male bee, which was found to use Texas snout bean as its food source, has not been documented anywhere else in the U.S. Leafcutter bees carry pieces of leaves to their egg chambers, according to Sharp and Eastmanís website.

Read more and see photo: https://www.themonitor.com/news/local/article_8f2edd76-c516-11e8-a133-d335f1557075.html
(McAllen Monitor)

6 replies, 1066 views

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Reply Rare bee discovered at National Butterfly Center (Original post)
TexasTowelie Oct 2018 OP
sprinkleeninow Oct 2018 #1
TexasTowelie Oct 2018 #2
Kurt V. Oct 2018 #3
Alliepoo Oct 2018 #5
Kurt V. Oct 2018 #6
texasfiddler Oct 2018 #4

Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 03:59 AM

1. I positively love reading news like this about nature.🐝

Thank you, TT.

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Response to sprinkleeninow (Reply #1)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 04:07 AM

2. You're welcome and it's definitely better than when the killer bees came up north.

It's another sign of climate change I suppose. I remember over 30 years ago when we started seeing green jays in south Texas where I grew up. We lived more than 150 miles further north than their natural habitat in the Rio Grande Valley so it was a notable event.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 05:32 AM

3. Speaking of butterflies

the monarchs have been coming through Missouri all weekend. That was good to see.

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Response to Kurt V. (Reply #3)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 08:59 AM

5. Great news!!

I hope some of those beautiful Monarchs are mine!! We raised 28 beauties in our kitchen this summer. Just released our last one on Friday!!

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Response to Alliepoo (Reply #5)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 10:15 AM

6. Amazing! thank you

Where did release them from?

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Oct 1, 2018, 06:16 AM

4. I see this as a result of climate change

I have lived in South Texas all of my life. Many species that I see now, were not in this area when I was a kid. All of the new species I see have moved up from Central America. Caracaras, coati, brown widows, green jays, white wing dove, etc. Even white cattle egrets were not around in our area before the mid 60s (before my time). A biologist friend of mine blames the northern migration of the egret with the demise of horned lizards in our area.

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