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Sat Apr 25, 2015, 01:00 PM

Sailed off to Galipolli

They told me, dear young ANZAC;
They told me you were dead.
They brought me bitter news to hear
And bitter tears I shed.

Yes Indeed the band did play...




We won't forget your fallen Australia!

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Reply Sailed off to Galipolli (Original post)
mackerel Apr 2015 OP
The River Apr 2015 #1
Shrike47 Apr 2015 #2
Fairgo Apr 2015 #3
Matilda Apr 2015 #4
Fairgo Apr 2015 #5
Matilda May 2015 #6
Fairgo May 2015 #7

Response to mackerel (Original post)

Sat Apr 25, 2015, 01:11 PM

1. Geat Tune

I included it my play list (guitar) many years ago.

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Response to mackerel (Original post)

Sat Apr 25, 2015, 01:46 PM

2. World War One was a tragic and very personal war. Poor heroes.

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Response to mackerel (Original post)

Sat Apr 25, 2015, 06:29 PM

3. Anzac from the outside

I observed the day in full, and in a way, for the first time upon the Centenary. It's difficult to wrap your head and heart around the moment and its meaning to Australians. This year I made a bit of a study of it, and talked to my Aussie friends about it...visited the memorial in Hyde Park, and finally watch the dawn ceremony in the cove. To all my Aussie friends, I stand with you and pay respects. "...Lest we forget"

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Response to Fairgo (Reply #3)

Sun Apr 26, 2015, 11:12 PM

4. I've been through the whole range of emotions.

From the pride of a youthful member of the Junior Red Cross, attending our own service at Government House, to the twenty-something rebellion against the "glorification" of war, to the poignancy of seeing my father's generation of WWII vets age and gradually diminish in numbers, until now there are only a handful left.

It means more to me now than it ever did before, yet still there is always in my mind now the message of the play and film "Oh, What A Lovely War", which more than anything reminds us of the sheer waste and horror of war.

We never have learned.

Lest We Forget

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Response to Matilda (Reply #4)

Mon Apr 27, 2015, 05:38 AM

5. Thanks for the insight

I've got a lot to learn about this beautiful country...

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Response to Fairgo (Reply #5)

Sun May 3, 2015, 10:54 PM

6. Not all glory and honour ...

I'm part of the Vietnam War generation, so there is still a big question for me, and that is why Australia (and the other Commonweath countries) jumped uunquestioningly into both World Wars. There were in both wars some who questioned whether we should be involved, but they were regarded almost as traitors.

PM Menzies' statement in 1939 that "England has declared war on Germany. Australia is therefore also at war with Germany" has today been condemned by many legal experts as a load of rubbish: there was no legal requirement for Australia to follow England into war with Germany, or anybody else.

Only with Vietnam did Australians begin to question our blind obedience to foreign powers, and that came from the young, who were being asked to fight a war in a country we'd never heard of for a reason we didn't care about. Older Australians once again took it for granted that we would fight wherever we were asked to. Only when it dragged on with no victory and thousands of dead, did the older generations join the condemnation of that particular exercise in futility.

Yet there we were again this century, following the U.S. and the U.K. into a foreign war that not only had nothing to do with us, but was for obviously spurious reasons. Yet although hundreds of thousands marched in this country against it, once again, our craven politicians (most of whom had never been in any war), followed our foreign allies blindly into Iraq, and we are now all paying the price for the destabilisation of that country.

I feel pride and sadness for all the young men who "went with songs to the battle", having no idea of the horrors they were about to face, and who came back if they did come back wounded in mind and body. But it would have been better if they'd never gone.

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Response to Matilda (Reply #6)

Mon May 4, 2015, 03:34 AM

7. Last draft card

I received my number, then Saigon fell, and I didn't have to announce what i had already decided. Since then i have marched and held vigil in protest of every misguided adventure US industry has drummed us into. Same as it ever was...and I'll never understand.

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