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Sun May 26, 2013, 04:57 AM

Woolwich murder probe: 'Thousands' at risk of radicalisation, says Theresa May

Thousands of people are potentially at risk of being radicalised in the UK, Home Secretary Theresa May has said.

She also told BBC One's Andrew Marr Show that those at risk were at "different points on what could be a path to violent extremism".

Mrs May said a new taskforce would look at whether new powers were needed to tackle radicalisation.

Three more arrests have been made in connection with the killing of soldier Lee Rigby in Woolwich.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22671619

Woolwich attack: soldier's 'killer' in dock on terror link three years ago.

One of the alleged killers of Drummer Lee Rigby appeared in court in Kenya suspected of leading a group of Islamists trying to join terrorists in Somalia.

The Sunday Telegraph can disclose that Michael Adebolajo was held by police close to the Somali border with a band of "radicalised" Muslim youths who wanted to join the notorious al-Shabaab group.

He was deported to Britain after he appeared in court in Mombasa in November 2010.

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The disclosures raise further questions about the monitoring by the security services of Adebowale and Adebolajo, 28, whom sources have said was known to MI5 but not assessed as a "threat to life".

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/editors-choice/editors-picks/10080958/Woolwich-attack-soldiers-killer-in-dock-on-terror-link-three-years-ago.html

I think that should've said "he was deported back to Britain" given that's he's British.

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Reply Woolwich murder probe: 'Thousands' at risk of radicalisation, says Theresa May (Original post)
dipsydoodle May 2013 OP
JustAnotherGen May 2013 #1
dipsydoodle May 2013 #2
JustAnotherGen May 2013 #5
muriel_volestrangler May 2013 #6
JustAnotherGen May 2013 #7
dipsydoodle May 2013 #8
muriel_volestrangler May 2013 #3
muriel_volestrangler May 2013 #4
Jeneral2885 May 2013 #9

Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2013, 06:14 AM

1. I can't copy and paste

From BBC on my tablet for some reason. . .

The first article - Ms May references the need for a Communications Data bill. Am I to understand that FB Posts and such are not able to be entered into court in Great Britain as evidence?

I work in telecom and I think the gathering of phone records willy nilly by law enforcement in the US is over reach - aside from being a pain in the ass and taking us away from revenue earning tasks. But Social Networking - those are already in the public domain. I guess I'm shocked that what one blasts out to the world cannot be used in this case.

Or am I not interpreting it correctly?

Regardless - thanks for posting this as I would have likely missed it.

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #1)

Sun May 26, 2013, 06:29 AM

2. Both FB posts and Tweets have already been used in court here.

.

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Response to dipsydoodle (Reply #2)

Sun May 26, 2013, 07:13 AM

5. I know

Even in family court - its how my brother proved his 20 year old daughter had moved out and in with her boyfriend . . . So he could end child support. I was the person who stalked his ex wife's and daughter's Facebook page.

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #5)

Sun May 26, 2013, 08:18 AM

6. 'Here', for dipsydoodle, is the UK (nt)

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Response to muriel_volestrangler (Reply #6)

Sun May 26, 2013, 08:47 AM

7. Ooooh

I missed that.

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #7)

Sun May 26, 2013, 11:30 AM

8. My fault.

I shouldn't have taken that granted.

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #1)

Sun May 26, 2013, 06:39 AM

3. No, I don't think there's a problem with using Facebook posts as evidence

The involvement of Facebook in the bill seems to be in the area of handing over encrypted data, and decrypting it - see the Parliamentary report: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/jt201213/jtselect/jtdraftcomuni/79/7907.htm

Indeed, people are being arrested right now, for what they've said in the public domain on social networks:

In Surrey, Mohammed Mazar, 19, of Balmoral Drive, Woking has been charged with improper use of the public electronic communications network, in connections with comments posed on a social media website.

Sussex Police arrested and charged a London man in Hastings on Friday in connection with an offensive message on Facebook. Unemployed Adam Rogers, 28, of Kingsman Street, Woolwich, is accused of sending an "offensive, indecent or menacing message" online.

Hampshire Constabulary said a 23-year-old Michaela Turner, of Lumsden Road, Southsea, had been charged with an offence under the Communications Act in connection with a "grossly offensive" message.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-22665443

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2013, 06:44 AM

4. For those who may avoid the Telegraph because of the paywall limit, here's the Independent on Kenya

He was one of seven men arrested by Kenyan police after landing on an island off the Kenyan coast in November 2010. Local press reports of the arrests referred to Mr Adebolajo as a "Nigerian with a British passport" who was "suspected of masterminding the racket". Police claimed the men were travelling to Somalia to join the ranks of the al-Shabaab terrorist group. His family claimed he was held in detention and tortured before being deported back to Britain without charge.

After the incident, members of his family said he was "pestered" by MI5 agents pressuring him to become an informant for them and infiltrate radical Islamic extremist groups. Relatives said other family members were also harassed and questioned by the UK authorities. In an exclusive interview with The IoS, Mr Adebolajo's brother-in law claimed constant demands to get him to spy on Muslim clerics might have pushed him over the edge.
...
The young men had gone on a speedboat from Lamu island to Kizingitini, Pate island, where they were arrested by police who were waiting for them after a tip off. The group he was travelling with, which included two secondary-school boys, had been radicalised during weekly visits to a mosque in Mombasa, according to police sources.

They were thrown in jail and "the suspect from Nigeria" accused police of torturing him, according to local reports.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/mi5-tried-to-recruit-woolwich-attack-suspect-michael-adebolajo-8632398.html

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Response to dipsydoodle (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2013, 04:46 AM

9. At least now its "radicalisation"

And not terrorists as first broadcasted in the media.

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