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Sun Mar 15, 2015, 10:43 PM

New ICC President Silvia Fernández de Gurmendi: 'Trials in Argentina have been an example for world'

Buenos Aires Herald
March 15, 2015

Argentine jurist Silvia Fernández de Gurmendi became the president of the International Criminal Court (ICC) last week. In conversation with the Herald, the lawyer — the second Argentine to arrive at The Hague after Luis Moreno Ocampo was first appointed prosecutor before the ICC — said the 1985 trial against the Junta leaders was the example to follow when it came to prosecuting heinous crimes.

“Trials in Argentina have been an example for the rest of the world,” Fernández de Gurmendi said in a telephone conversation with this newspaper two days after she was appointed to head the ICC for the next three years. Soon after the Cold War was over, countries around the world started debating the creation of an international court to end with the impunity of criminal perpetrators. The milestone came in 1998 when the Rome Statute was approved, which entered into force four years later when it was ratified by more than 100 nations.

...

Q:Some authors say that the 1985 trial against the leaders of the 1976-83 dictatorship triggered a “cascade of justice” around the world. Do you agree?

A:Of course. Proceedings in Argentina influenced other trials around the world and were taken as example of how criminal justice can be applied to these crimes. The Argentine experience is an example.

At: http://buenosairesherald.com/article/184340/%E2%80%98trials-in-argentina-have-been-an-example-for-world%E2%80%99
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It's worth noting Argentina is the only country in the world to have systemically tried human rights offenders regardless of military rank or having civilian/clergy status, rather than merely prosecuting a few former dictators or generals (of course, most countries with past or ongoing dirty wars have refused to do even that - or, like Colombia, Honduras, or Mexico, even admit a dirty war has taken place at all).

To be fair, it's certainly not easy and it takes courage.

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Reply New ICC President Silvia Fernández de Gurmendi: 'Trials in Argentina have been an example for world' (Original post)
forest444 Mar 2015 OP
Judi Lynn Mar 2015 #1

Response to forest444 (Original post)

Mon Mar 16, 2015, 01:24 AM

1. It takes courage when supporters of those former fascist regimes still live within the countries.

It takes a long time before brutal, arrogant, murderous right-wingers who sustained the evil tyrants in their genocidal abuse of leftists completely lose their influence, since the administrations following them don't round them all up, torture and murder them, as they did their political opponents.

As we all know, Carlos Saul Menem, friend of the entire George H. W. Bush family, made special efforts to give blanket immunity to all the murdering, torturing monsters during his loathesome time in office before Kirshner and Fernandez were able to start bringing justice to life in that country.

We've heard there is still an extremist right-wing faction wielding enormous power in Argentina, some of whom assisted US military in training right-wing death squads in both South and Central American countries.

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