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Fri Jan 29, 2021, 09:38 PM

Stunning eagle sculpture uncovered at sacred Aztec temple in Mexico

Stunning eagle sculpture uncovered at sacred Aztec temple in Mexico
By Harry Baker - Staff Writer 6 hours ago

It is around 600 years old.



The bas-relief of a golden eagle found near the foot of Templo Mayor.
(Image: © Mirsa Islas)

A striking 600-year-old Aztec sculpture depicting a golden eagle has been uncovered in an ancient temple in Mexico, archaeologists with Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) announced Monday (Jan. 25).

The eagle, which measures 41.7 inches by 27.6 inches (106 by 70 centimeters), is the largest bas-relief sculpture ever found at the temple.

The eagle was carved into the floor of a structure at the foot of Templo Mayor — the iconic pyramid-shaped temple that was built at the heart of the ancient Aztec capital city of Tenochtitlán and is now in modern-day Mexico City.

Artists created the bas-relief — a type of sculpture with raised images carved out of a stone background — in the mid-15th century during the reign of Moctezuma I.

More:
https://www.livescience.com/aztec-eagle-sculpture-uncovered.html?utm_source=notification




Also







From:
The Great Temple of Tenochtitlan
The archaeological rescue of the Templo Mayor de Tenochtitlan in Mexico revealed a lot of information about the culture of the Aztecs.
https://www.lavanguardia.com/historiayvida/edad-moderna/20190324/47309892142/el-templo-mayor-de-tenochtitlan.html#foto-4









Also posted in Anthropology:
https://www.democraticunderground.com/12296619

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Reply Stunning eagle sculpture uncovered at sacred Aztec temple in Mexico (Original post)
Judi Lynn Jan 2021 OP
tiredtoo Jan 2021 #1
My Pet Orangutan Jan 2021 #4
stevesinpa Jan 2021 #7
My Pet Orangutan Jan 2021 #9
mopinko Jan 2021 #12
My Pet Orangutan Jan 2021 #13
Cozmo Jan 2021 #2
Duppers Jan 2021 #3
Duppers Jan 2021 #5
iluvtennis Jan 2021 #6
stevesinpa Jan 2021 #8
Judi Lynn Jan 2021 #10
Judi Lynn Jan 2021 #11

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jan 29, 2021, 11:25 PM

1. Seeing these pictures

Can make one sad knowing the way our forefathers decimated this great civilization.

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Response to tiredtoo (Reply #1)

Fri Jan 29, 2021, 11:51 PM

4. A 'great civilization' that and practiced and venerated 'human sacrifice like no other

In four days, the Aztecs murdered ('scarified') 80K at Tenochtitlan -butchered 20K people a day - over four days 1487.



That 'civilization' deserved to decimated, re-decimated, and, cremated.



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Response to My Pet Orangutan (Reply #4)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 12:25 AM

7. name a civilization that doesnt have horrible actions in its history.

go ahead, name one.

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Response to stevesinpa (Reply #7)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 12:36 AM

9. All 'civilizations' have murdered ... all of them -

but none, NONE, put ritual murder at the 'heart' of their 'civilization' in the way the Aztec's did.

LIKE NO OTHER

The Aztecs practiced and venerated 'human sacrifice' like no other

If you can nominate any 'civilization' who placed more importance on human 'sacrifice' - who waged wars - not for territory, but to replenish the herd of those to be 'sacrificed' - I am all ears.

I'm all ears - care to play?

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Response to My Pet Orangutan (Reply #4)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 09:00 AM

12. and wore their victims skins.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #12)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 09:03 AM

13. and went to war, not for territory,

but to replenish the sacrificial stock.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Fri Jan 29, 2021, 11:30 PM

2. With all that is going on currently, we may be on the short road to decimation ourselves

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Response to Cozmo (Reply #2)

Fri Jan 29, 2021, 11:47 PM

3. We are!

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 12:16 AM

5. Stunning!

What amazingly creative artisans Cortés destroyed. 😞


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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 12:24 AM

6. KnR. nt

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 12:26 AM

8. i wonder....

how long before the delusional morons at history channel have this on an episode of ancient aliens

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 07:53 AM

10. We Learned About the Aztecs From Their Conquerors--But New Research Is Letting Them Speak for Themsel

We Learned About the Aztecs From Their Conquerors—But New Research Is Letting Them Speak for Themselves



A stone Aztec calendar of the sun, on display at a museum circa 1930 Ewing Galloway—Getty Images

BY CAMILLA TOWNSEND NOVEMBER 1, 2019 1:00 PM EDT
With the U.S.-Mexico border a focal point of division in today’s American politics, it has become commonplace for one group of Americans to hurl insults at Mexicans and clamor for the building of a wall to keep them out, while another group insists on Mexicans’ goodness relative to others and reminds Americans that they have made invaluable contributions to the country.

Amid all this, it is easy to forget that migrations between today’s United States and Mexico once went in the reverse direction, that what is now Mexico City was once the Aztec capital — and that it was, without a doubt, the beating heart of North America.

Corn farmers had lived in central Mexico longer than anywhere else and, as a result, had developed a great civilization, complete with marketplaces, schools and running water. People as far north as today’s Utah had heard all about their marvelous and wealthy land, and whenever warfare or drought brought suffering, hundreds and even thousands of people would make their way south, hoping for a better life.

The city that emerged on a lake in the central valley of Mexico was called Tenochtitlan (Ten-och-TEE-tlan) and its people were called the Mexica (Me-SHEE-ka). Today we call them the Aztecs, and they have a fearsome reputation in our minds. The Spaniards, whose conquest of the Aztecs began 500 years ago this year, in 1519, told us most of what we think we know about them. Apparently motivated by guilt about what they had destroyed, the Europeans painted a bleak picture of Aztec life before the Christians arrived. (Remorse can be seen in a famous account written by the foot soldier Bernal Diaz de Castillo: “Of that beautiful place, nothing is now left standing.”). Since the 1970s, archaeologists, in uncovering their most dramatic site, twin temple pyramids, produced a horrifying record of skulls and serrated flint-knives. Taken together, these artifacts and accounts suggested that the Mexica were a barbaric and violent people.

But defining the Aztecs based purely on their European conquerors’ judgments and the look of a few silent objects leads to an incomplete picture at best. Until we have heard people speak for themselves—explain their actions and motivations; disclose their fears and insecurities; and express love, humor and wit—we don’t really know them.

. . .

For too long, we have accepted as fact the records left behind by the Spaniards, whose language, culture and worldview vastly differed from the people they conquered. Five hundred years ago Hernando Cortés arrived in Mexico, and all these centuries later we still don’t really know the Aztecs—or their descendants—at all. There is a rich and multifaceted Aztec history that we’ve been missing all along. Luckily for us, the Mexica people had the forethought to write down their stories, to record their voices for posterity. It’s time we started listening.

More:
https://time.com/5715476/aztec-history-myths/

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2021, 08:28 AM

11. 500 Years Later, The Spanish Conquest Of Mexico Is Still Being Debated

November 10, 20199:00 AM ET

JAMES FREDRICK

Twice this year, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has publicly asked the Spanish crown to apologize for atrocities against native people.

. . .

"After they arrived here on Nov. 8, it's likely that the first place the Aztecs brought the Spanish was here to the Great Temple," says Carlos Javier González González, former director of the Great Temple project. "Symbolically, the Great Temple was the center of the universe to the Aztecs. It was the point from which the world turned."

NPR joined González and Raúl Barrera Rodríguez, director of the urban archaeology program at Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, for a tour around the Great Temple's remains.

For centuries, Spanish testimony portrayed the Aztecs and other Indigenous groups in the Americas as uncivilized, savage barbarians. But continued excavation of the Great Temple and Tenochtitlán has helped change that perception.

"Tenochtitlán was a huge city," says Barrera. "It had public institutions, a whole system of government, public servants, schools, public services — it was a totally organized city."

After the fall of Tenochtitlán, the Spanish built their city directly on top of it. Barrera's urban archaeology program, which has first rights to excavation at any buildings under construction or renovation in Mexico City's historical center, aims to reveal this underground city.

"It's like a puzzle we're trying to put together," he says.

. . .

For centuries, Spanish testimony portrayed the Aztecs and other Indigenous groups in the Americas as uncivilized, savage barbarians. But continued excavation of the Great Temple and Tenochtitlán has helped change that perception.

"Tenochtitlán was a huge city," says Barrera. "It had public institutions, a whole system of government, public servants, schools, public services — it was a totally organized city."

After the fall of Tenochtitlán, the Spanish built their city directly on top of it. Barrera's urban archaeology program, which has first rights to excavation at any buildings under construction or renovation in Mexico City's historical center, aims to reveal this underground city.

"It's like a puzzle we're trying to put together," he says.

. . .

"Misunderstanding and misrepresentation of something like Aztec civilization today can make it easier for us to misunderstand and misrepresent Indigenous peoples of the Americas," he says.

More:
https://www.npr.org/2019/11/10/777220132/500-years-later-the-spanish-conquest-of-mexico-is-still-being-debated


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