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Wed Feb 24, 2021, 07:36 AM

Mexico moves to strip Tamaulipas governor's immunity for alleged organized crime links

FEBRUARY 23, 202110:17 PM UPDATED 7 HOURS AGO
By Reuters Staff
2 MIN READ

MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - Mexico’s attorney general’s office has asked lawmakers to strip the governor of the violent northern state of Tamaulipas of his immunity, alleging probable cause for money laundering and ties to organized crime, a ruling party leader said on Tuesday.

Ignacio Mier, the majority leader of Mexico’s lower house of Congress, wrote on Twitter on Tuesday that lawmakers received the request for Francisco Garcia Cabeza de Vaca’s immunity to be removed, posting a copy of a letter along with his tweet.

Federal sources confirmed the authenticity of the letter to Reuters.

Tamaulipas is widely considered one of the most lawless areas of Mexico, where the line between the authorities and organized crime sometimes blurs. This month, officials arrested a dozen elite Tamaulipas state officers for alleged involvement in a massacre that left 19 people, mostly migrants, dead, with many of the bodies badly charred.

Two of the state’s previous three governors are now under arrest.

More:
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mexico-crime/mexico-moves-to-strip-tamaulipas-governors-immunity-for-alleged-organized-crime-links-idUSKBN2AO0D9

Might want to swerve around Tamaulipas when driving south!







Back up! Wrong way.

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Reply Mexico moves to strip Tamaulipas governor's immunity for alleged organized crime links (Original post)
Judi Lynn Feb 2021 OP
Cirque du So-What Feb 2021 #1
Judi Lynn Feb 2021 #2
Cirque du So-What Feb 2021 #3
Judi Lynn Mar 2021 #4

Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Wed Feb 24, 2021, 08:54 AM

1. I worked at a company that moved a big chunk of its manufacturing to Reynosa (a city in Tamaulipas)

It necessitated a good amount of travel there to educate the local workforce on how to do the jobs they were relinquishing to the new employees. One new expense of doing business in Tamaulipas was paying off the cartel to leave their operation alone - not unlike a bar owner paying off the mob in any major American city.

Sorpresa!

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Response to Cirque du So-What (Reply #1)

Wed Feb 24, 2021, 09:49 AM

2. Wow. Interesting situation, could be uncomfortable. Sounds as if they have the run of the place.

One has to wonder how that area will ever be free of them...

Thanks.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #2)

Wed Feb 24, 2021, 09:56 AM

3. It's a bad situation

considering that the cartel could shut down - or destroy - that facility any time they wanted.

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Response to Judi Lynn (Original post)

Mon Mar 1, 2021, 07:58 PM

4. He fled Guatemala looking for a better life. But he and 18 others were killed en route to the US.

Karol SuarezSpecial to The Louisville Courier Journal
Published 3:30 p.m. ET Mar. 1, 2021




COMITANCILLO, Guatemala – In early January, Marvin Alberto Tomás woke up here in his hometown, eager to start the long journey to America he hoped would provide a better life for his mother and four little sisters.

Instead, the nearly 2,000-mile trip through two countries would end with his death.

Tomás, 22, nicknamed "El Zurdo" or "Lefty," was one of 19 migrants whose charred bodies were found Jan. 22 inside two vans in the town of Santa Anita in Camargo, the Mexican state of Tamaulipas – barely 50 miles from the U.S. border.

A dozen Mexican police officers are now being held in custody on homicide charges in the deaths.

The massacre and subsequent arrests have further exposed the danger facing Central American migrants fleeing their countries because of unemployment, poverty and gang violence in the hope of a better life in America.

But for too many families, those hopes are ending in despair and death.

"He just wanted a better life for his four little siblings," Ingrid Tomás, Marvin's eldest sister, said from her home in Comitancillo.

More:
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2021/03/01/migrants-hoping-new-start-us-fall-prey-violence-mexico/6870768002/

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