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Wed May 26, 2021, 12:31 PM

Carolina gold rice

Im watching a Netflix series called High on the Hog, which is about the origins of African American cuisine and well worth watching. They brought up an heirloom rice variety called Carolina Gold. I did a bit of googling and its possible to buy this variety, so I did. Now to figure out what to do with it when it arrives.

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Reply Carolina gold rice (Original post)
spinbaby May 26 OP
soothsayer May 26 #1
Cracklin Charlie May 26 #2
spinbaby May 26 #4
northoftheborder May 26 #3
live love laugh May 26 #5
csziggy May 28 #6

Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Wed May 26, 2021, 12:32 PM

1. Ooh, never heard of it! Off to Google with me

Oooh sounds awesome

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Wed May 26, 2021, 12:39 PM

2. "High on the Hog" sounds like a show I need to watch!

Thanks!

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Response to Cracklin Charlie (Reply #2)

Wed May 26, 2021, 02:22 PM

4. Well worth watching

Im learning a lot.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Wed May 26, 2021, 12:58 PM

3. I ordered some of that. (from Anson Mills.)It is excellent - tastes like no other rice I've eaten.

Instructions from their website for cooking.

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Wed May 26, 2021, 06:06 PM

5. Sounds interesting gonna watch. nt

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Response to spinbaby (Original post)

Fri May 28, 2021, 01:18 AM

6. Make the original Hopping John

As discussed in this article:

The Historic Problem With Hoppin' John
by Robert Moss
updated Dec. 22, 2020

{SNIP}

The original ingredients of Hoppin' John are simple: one pound of bacon, one pint of peas, and one pint of rice. The earliest appearance in print seems to be in Sarah Rutledge's The Carolina Housewife (1847), and it's important to note that everything was cooked together in the same pot:

"First put on the peas, and when half boiled, add the bacon. When the peas are well boiled, throw in the rice, which must first be washed and gravelled. When the rice has been boiling half an hour, take the pot off the fire and put it on coals to steam, as in boiling rice alone."


{SNIP}

The Bacon
In the old days, salt and smoke were used to preserve the meat, which cured for weeks and then was smoked for two days or more. Today's commodity bacon is processed in less than a day: brine-injected, flash-smoked, and packed for shipping.

The Rice
The original Hoppin' John was made with the famed Carolina Gold rice, a non-aromatic long-grained variety prized for its lush and delicate flavor. But that rice was ill-suited for modern agriculture. The Lowcountry tidal swamps were too soft to support mechanical harvesters, and the rice required far too much manual labor to be viable in the post-Emancipation world. A hurricane in 1911 effectively finished off the industry in the Carolinas, and American rice production shifted to Texas, Arkansas, and Louisiana, where planters grew new hybridized varieties on dry ground.

The Peas
Red cowpeas have a black-eye in the center just like their paler cousins, so they can be referred to as "red black-eyed peas." To complicate matters, in the 19th century there were any number of landrace and cross-bred varieties, often unique to just one or two family's fields. These included the Sea Island Red Pea, which was once a key rotation crop on the Sea Island just south of Charleston but whose production was abandoned when rice growing ended.

https://www.seriouseats.com/southern-hoppin-john-new-years-tradition


Cowpeas are easy to find dried, you have the Carolina Gold rice, so all you have to source is old fashioned bacon. I know where to get it, at the little country store up the road from here that also makes some of the best smoked sausage in the world. Unfortunately, although they will ship their sausage and smoked pork chops, they don't ship their bacon.

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