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Wed May 15, 2019, 07:28 AM

Beer Soup for Breakfast and Corn Flakes instead of Sex



A history behind the way Americans eat in the mornings......

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American breakfast begins in Europe, which provided the food norms imported by early colonizers. There, the day’s first meal had emerged from centuries of prohibition under the Catholic Church. “There was a period of time in England and western Europe where eating breakfast was sort of tied to gluttony,” says Heather Arndt Anderson, the author of Breakfast: A History. That all changed with the Protestant Reformation, when morning sustenance became more broadly permissible, if not all that exciting, or even distinct from everything else people ate. Lack of refrigeration meant the meal was usually sour and tepid. In Germany, beer soup was common.

In early America, breakfast remained a matter of convenience for most people: bread; preserved meats; repurposed leftovers; and things, like eggs, that were easy to prepare and regularly available to rural families, Arndt Anderson says.

According to Krishnendu Ray, a professor of food studies at New York University, that’s consistent with how much of the world still approaches the day’s first meal. “Poorer people everywhere, especially in places like India and China, eat the same kind of food for meal after meal,” he says. “The strict differentiation of meals is partly an American thing, but partly a thing of upward mobility.” Breakfast food, as a concept, is a luxury. As colonial America developed into a more robust culture with distinct class markers, breakfast started to change with it.

The alarm with which Americans now commonly regard eating day-old, unrefrigerated food started to develop as the Industrial Revolution changed food preservation, the workday, and cultural conceptions of health. Arguably no one was more directly responsible for these shifts than the Kellogg brothers, who developed Corn Flakes in the late 1800s as an outgrowth of John Harvey Kellogg’s work at his Battle Creek Sanitarium, in Michigan. Kellogg was a doctor and an adherent of the Seventh Day Adventist Church, which advocated a bland, vegetarian diet and abstention from things like caffeine and alcohol.

Although historical tellings tend to emphasize that Corn Flakes were designed to steer people away from sexual thoughts, Arndt Anderson says they also served other Adventist aims. “It was tied to the health benefits of having a little grain to get your morning constitutional,” she says. Kellogg was “really interested in getting people to poop.”

More:

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2019/05/what-is-breakfast/589411/

********* I can't help but notice that organized religion tried to rule even what people ate in years gone by! Ugh

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Reply Beer Soup for Breakfast and Corn Flakes instead of Sex (Original post)
Ohiogal May 2019 OP
underpants May 2019 #1
Siwsan May 2019 #2
Ohiogal May 2019 #4
Siwsan May 2019 #5
Ohiogal May 2019 #7
Siwsan May 2019 #8
Saviolo May 2019 #9
elleng May 2019 #10
csziggy May 2019 #12
marble falls May 2019 #3
Ohiogal May 2019 #6
Kali May 2019 #11

Response to Ohiogal (Original post)

Wed May 15, 2019, 07:34 AM

1. Knew about the Kellog's masterbation thing.

We used to drink a lot more than we do know as hard as that is to believe.

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Response to Ohiogal (Original post)

Wed May 15, 2019, 07:44 AM

2. Here's a breakfast photo shared on one of my favorite Welsh FB pages

There's a saying that the British don't break fast. They SHATTER fast. And I can attest to it. On my earlier trips to the UK, we would stay at Bed and Breakfast places, off the main roads. This is the sort of breakfast we'd be served. We'd always look for places that advertised serving a "Full English" for breakfast. Sometimes we'd set the bread and sliced meats aside, and use them to make sandwiches, for lunch. The only thing missing from this picture is a bowl of cold cereal.

The landlords at one B&B in Llandudno, North Wales, were surprised that, every morning, I'd ask for the full breakfast - black pudding, and all. They said very few Americans are quite that adventurous, when it came to their morning meal.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #2)

Wed May 15, 2019, 07:53 AM

4. Yikes!

I don’t think I could eat all that in one day!

But, a Denny’s All American grand slam would probably be comparable.

(an aside, coffee and a yogurt is about all I can handle most days)

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #4)

Wed May 15, 2019, 07:58 AM

5. I love a good breakfast

There's an old saying that goes something like 'Eat breakfast like a King, lunch like a Prince and dinner like a Pauper.' Which makes sense. The mornings are when you need the biggest energy provider, to get through the day. Lunch maintains the energy, and at night, well, it's time to fuel down. Which is pretty much the opposite of the American way of dining.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #5)

Wed May 15, 2019, 08:06 AM

7. That's very true and it makes a lot of sense.

I just cannot face food of any kind until I’m up for several hours.

If I didn’t have a spouse and two adult sons here at home, I’d probably end up grazing all day.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #7)

Wed May 15, 2019, 08:09 AM

8. Grazing is my mode, after breakfast is digested

Especially in the Spring/Summer when I'm entrenched in the yard work. Every time I take a break, I'll find some 'fuel' to munch on. Sometimes dinner is little more than cheese and crackers.

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Response to Ohiogal (Reply #7)

Wed May 15, 2019, 09:17 AM

9. That is very much me.

I can't even look at food when I first wake up. My husband is the exactly opposite, he has to have a snack of something pretty protein-ey just before bed or he wakes up famished. He needs to eat as soon as he's out of bed, preferably something with protein, as a bunch of carbs make him hungry again right away.

We tend to make breakfast jars (rolled oats, milk, chia seeds, peanut butter, yogurt, frozen fruit/berries) the night before and eat them for breakfast the next morning. He gets out of bed, makes a couple of strips of bacon, and eats them with his breakfast jar. I pack mine in my backpack and take it to work with me, and eat it at my desk after some walking and an hour of transit.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #2)

Wed May 15, 2019, 11:51 AM

10. Love the reminder! Little b&b we visited in Llandudno didn't serve such.

Closer was the boarding house I stayed at in London for a while, included 1/2 tomato baked/broiled but no mushrooms, and no black pudding.

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Response to Siwsan (Reply #2)

Wed May 15, 2019, 12:51 PM

12. Later this year I will be in Britain for almost three months

And I'm wondering what I can have for breakfast that won't destroy my diet! Out of the things on the plate in your picture, I could have one egg, mushrooms, tomatoes, one slice of bacon, and maybe a slice of toast.

Part of the trip I will be with a tour. They are recommending a "hearty" breakfast, a light lunch, and then a decent dinner. For breakfast I am used to eating one or two homemade muffins (low fat, low sugar) with a cup of hot tea. Somehow I think that will have to change for this trip!

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Response to marble falls (Reply #3)

Wed May 15, 2019, 08:03 AM

6. Wow.

It was served to “prisoners and children”. Both demographics lowest on the totem pole back then, evidently. Sheesh.

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Response to Ohiogal (Original post)

Wed May 15, 2019, 11:52 AM

11. controlling food is directly related to the origins of "modern" religions

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