HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Arts & Humanities » Languages and Linguistics (Group) » Sweet Briar College (Virg...

Sun May 6, 2012, 09:29 AM

Sweet Briar College (Virginia, independent, women's college) cutting its German program.

Since its inception, German has always been taught and offered as a major both as a language and literature. Three years ago, Italian was cut.

It's a troubling trend to see arts, humanities, and languages as dispensable.

3 replies, 2475 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 3 replies Author Time Post
Reply Sweet Briar College (Virginia, independent, women's college) cutting its German program. (Original post)
no_hypocrisy May 2012 OP
hlthe2b May 2012 #1
Lydia Leftcoast May 2012 #2
CTyankee Jun 2012 #3

Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Sun May 6, 2012, 09:35 AM

1. Yes indeed.. We should be requiring foreign language througout primary school education- college IMO

Heavens.. And we wonder why jobs are being outsourced. sigh....

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hlthe2b (Reply #1)

Tue May 15, 2012, 03:23 PM

2. I traveled in Scandinavia last summer, and although I speak a bit of pidgin Norwegian,

I rarely had to use it, as opposed to when I went as a teenager.

In fact, when I was a teenager, I'd ask store clerks and the like, "Snakker du engelsk?" and about the time, the answer would be "Nej." But this time, I stopped asking, because people actually seemed offended that I thought they might not speak English.

Now everyone under the age of 50 or so speaks English and at least one other language. According to my relatives, they now start English in first grade.

When I was in Iceland, I ended up in one tour group that was about half English-speakers and half German-speakers, so the guide gave his spiel in both languages. His English was perfect, and since I grew up with German-speaking relatives, I could tell that his German was pretty good, too.

It's a shame to drop German. It's not only the official language of two countries (Germany, Austria) and one of the official languages of a third (Switzerland), but according to people I know who have traveled in Eastern Europe, it's a handy second language to know there, because people who don't speak English often speak German. (My church in Portland took in a couple of families of Bosnian refugees in the 1990s, and we German speakers had to do the communicating.)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to no_hypocrisy (Original post)

Mon Jun 11, 2012, 03:18 PM

3. My grandson's elementary school foreign language immersion program is not recruiting for

German kindergarten. They will go through sixth grade in German for the existing class but the German class will disappear.

My grandson's Italian program is doing pretty well. They keep getting the lower grade class populated so so far so good. He is going into 3rd grade in the fall.

The school is meeting with success for the upcoming inauguration of its newest addition, French. So many folks in the LA area want their kids to learn French and there are only private schools that start the little ones off and take them through in French. Our elementary school in Glendale is a magnet school for those families drawn to having their kids start another language (or keep them fluent if a parent speaks the other language in the home).

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread