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Tue Jan 3, 2012, 01:59 PM

What is your favorite American English dialect?

I don't have a single favorite, but I like the R-dropping coastal Southern dialects (think Jimmy Carter), and the dialects of New England (pahk da cah in hahvahd yahd!)

And, of course, I like my own accent, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Central_American_English , which is also developing elements of the Northern Cities Vowel Shit (so when I say "cat" it sounds something like "ket", but with the vowel held longer).

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Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply What is your favorite American English dialect? (Original post)
Odin2005 Jan 2012 OP
RZM Jan 2012 #1
whathehell Sep 2012 #7
kag Jan 2012 #2
TigerToMany Jan 2012 #4
CTyankee Jun 2012 #6
lazarus Jan 2012 #3
raccoon Jan 2012 #5
geardaddy Oct 2012 #8
valerief Jan 2013 #9
Recursion Jan 2013 #10
RAFREE Dec 2013 #11
lanlady May 2020 #12
PoindexterOglethorpe May 2020 #13

Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 01:09 AM

1. I think most accents are interesting

 

I was at a cafe in Maine once. I was the only non-local there. Everyone else was a fisherman/lobsterman and they were all telling stories about that day's events. Apparently there had been a shark sighting. I remember thinking that the Maine accent isn't just a stereotype. They were all saying 'ayup' and lots of 'aas.' That's one of my favorites.

I also like the northern Great Lakes accent.

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Response to RZM (Reply #1)

Sat Sep 29, 2012, 02:56 PM

7. Me too.. so much so that I almost joined the American Dialect Society

but I found it a bit too wonky for me.

I come from Philadelphia and occassionally slip into that accent, but my favorite is the Boston Accent -- Pahk the Cah in Hahved Yahd.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 11:44 AM

2. I like the southern dialects.

I grew up in East Texas, and my next door neighbor was a native of New Orleans. I was always interested in how different her accent was from most of the people I knew. Hers was a slow, southern drawl, which I loved.

While I appear to have escaped the "Texas" accent (people are always surprised to find that I'm from Texas), I can spot different Texas dialects pretty easily. The quick, East Texas twang, versus the slow, West Texas drawl with its funny colloquialisms (Sodeee Water).

I also like the far northeastern (Maine) dialect, like the guy on the old Pepperidge Farm commercials.

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Response to kag (Reply #2)

Thu Jan 12, 2012, 07:00 AM

4. I don't like the South's politics

 

But I think that certain southern accents sound cool. Not so much the really hick type accent where it's hard to understand, but other southern accents like the Cajun one sound ok interesting.

I'm from Delaware, by the way.

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Response to kag (Reply #2)

Mon Jun 11, 2012, 03:41 PM

6. I grew up with that north Texas twang (in Dallas). I no longer have an accent, tho.

I love the north texas accent. It is soft and pretty.

GW Bush annoyed the hell out of me with his faux accent.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Thu Jan 5, 2012, 09:17 PM

3. Southern

but most people don't realize how many Southern accents there are. Hollywood, in particular, makes this mistake, with a jumble of accents all supposedly in one small town.

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Response to lazarus (Reply #3)

Thu Jan 12, 2012, 04:10 PM

5. Also Hollywood usually portrays Southerners as being dumb as rocks.

OF COURSE none of them are!

Well, you know, not all of them are.








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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Fri Oct 5, 2012, 02:09 PM

8. Great Lakes accent.

That Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Milwaukee nasally working class accent.

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sat Jan 5, 2013, 02:50 PM

9. New York, definitely. nt

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Fri Jan 11, 2013, 02:09 AM

10. "The pure American English is spoken in Boston, and perhaps as far as Watertown" (nt)

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed Dec 4, 2013, 10:28 AM

11. My favourite English Dialect

It's not necessarily "American" English dialect and is indeed a language all it's own. Derived from English as Dr. Louise Bennett "Miss Lou" said. Patois! She used to talk about how some made fun of Patois as being a "bastardization" of English while other sorts of accents and even American English were "derived from" English.

I've done volunteer work in Jamaican schools and so...I'm biased of course but, it's a very distinct language. It's sounds very poetic when spoken with a great lilt and timing. I can understand most of it except when locals speak it extremely fast then I lose the plot sometimes. Wish I could speak it as they do but, it's not proper really for "foreign" to take over Patois.

I wish there were a section for Caribbean issues. Lots of poverty there and lots of issues in places like Haiti, Jamaica, DR, Cuba to be discussed.

At any rate. Patois is my favourite derived from English dialect.

P.S. the spell check here marks British English as incorrect spelling! lol!

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Sat May 9, 2020, 03:16 PM

12. My grandmother's old New England accent

Dropping "r's" where they were supposed to be and putting them in where they had no business being. Her prayers would start with something that sounded like "lawd gurd." I'd laugh and say grandma, is god a squash?

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Response to Odin2005 (Original post)

Wed May 13, 2020, 12:52 AM

13. We really don't have dialects in American English.

Accents, yes. Dialects, no.

And there's a difference between the two.

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