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Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:07 PM

 

Message auto-removed

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply Message auto-removed (Original post)
Name removed Sep 19 OP
elleng Sep 19 #1
wendyb-NC Sep 19 #2
Name removed Sep 19 #10
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 19 #3
Name removed Sep 19 #7
The Velveteen Ocelot Sep 19 #11
niyad Sep 19 #4
Mme. Defarge Sep 19 #5
Name removed Sep 19 #8
Mme. Defarge Sep 19 #6
Name removed Sep 19 #9

Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:11 PM

1. Danke, Merci, Gracie, and WELCOME!

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Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:16 PM

2. Obrigada

I checked out the site it's very interesting.

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Response to wendyb-NC (Reply #2)


Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:18 PM

3. In all of the Scandinavian languages it's about the same,

but with different spellings:

Norwegian - Takk skal du ha (thanks you shall have)
Danish - Tak skal du have
Swedish - Tack
Icelandic - Ůakka ■Úr fyrir

Icelandic is a little different because ■ is pronounced as an unvoiced th as in English thank.

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #3)


Response to Name removed (Reply #7)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 01:28 PM

11. Pretty much, except for Icelandic.

Spoken Norwegian and Swedish sound pretty similar and the two languages are for the most part mutually intelligible though a lot of the words are spelled differently; written Danish and Norwegian are very close but spoken Danish is very hard to understand, even by other Scandinavians. It sounds like they are being strangled. Icelandic is a different animal; it's close to Old Norse, from which all the other languages descended, and it hasn't changed much since 1100. When you read it you can pick up a lot of words that are the same or similar to Norwegian in particular, but the grammar is very complex, as is typical of old languages, so even if you can decipher some words you can't figure out the context. When spoken it sounds like a creole of Norwegian and Klingon.

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Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:18 PM

4. Thank you for this most interesting OP

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Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:18 PM

5. In Greek

ευχαριστώ, ef̱charistˇ̱

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Response to Mme. Defarge (Reply #5)


Response to Name removed (Original post)

Sat Sep 19, 2020, 12:20 PM

6. In Arabic

شكرا, shukran

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Response to Mme. Defarge (Reply #6)