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Mon Apr 6, 2015, 01:54 PM

Where are the bills to end the militarization of police and murder of black men?

There's an interesting thread in GD, but it's getting no play, and more importantly, no thought on appropriate activism to move forward, so I thought I'd cross reference it here.
http://www.democraticunderground.com/10026425866

6 replies, 1658 views

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Reply Where are the bills to end the militarization of police and murder of black men? (Original post)
qwlauren35 Apr 2015 OP
guillaumeb Apr 2015 #1
Smarmie Doofus Apr 2015 #2
marym625 May 2015 #5
FrankAB May 2015 #3
marym625 May 2015 #4
California Patriot May 2015 #6

Response to qwlauren35 (Original post)

Mon Apr 6, 2015, 02:04 PM

1. This is how I responded to the other post:

I am a member of SouthsidersforPeace, a social justice group based in the Beverly area of Chicago.

We have been hosting movies about racism, as well as forums.

We had a recent discussion about Ferguson where a number of Ferguson protesters came with a video and spoken presentation.

We most recently showed the movie "Tulia Texas" about the racist implications of the drug war.
We have shown "The house I live in" also.

We are planning a forum on the Chicago Police Department for April 25th at the Beverly Unitarian Church.

Information about us can be found at www.southsidersforpeace.org

We both know that there are many groups working on this issue, but progress is slow.


And yes, the post should have triggered more responses, especially at DU. The militarization of the police is totally ignored by the media, which instead focuses on all the new "war toys" that are available to a police force that more and more resembles an occupying army.

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Response to guillaumeb (Reply #1)

Thu Apr 9, 2015, 12:59 PM

2. +1 n/t

 

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Response to guillaumeb (Reply #1)

Sat May 16, 2015, 10:00 PM

5. I was just going to message you

We need to protest at Homan. Please let me know if you have any plans for that. I am willing to help get something together

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Response to qwlauren35 (Original post)

Sat May 16, 2015, 09:44 PM

3. Militarization costs money

 

"militarization of police "


They act like they are getting these military items for free, but there are huge costs involved. A department often has to transport equipment itself. If you're talking about a Bearcat or other personnel carriers with armor, then your talking horrible gas mileage costs.

You also have to store these items, and storing a large item like a Bearcat is not cheap. There is also the cost of maintenance. The vehicles take a lot of oil and other routine maintenance. Don't forget the training. Many law enforcement are totally unfamiliar with these vehicles and how to even run them, let alone use them effectively.

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Response to qwlauren35 (Original post)

Sat May 16, 2015, 09:58 PM

4. I just saw this

Thank you

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Response to qwlauren35 (Original post)

Thu May 21, 2015, 11:23 AM

6. What I would like to see as an appropriate activism focus:

I live in Southern California, and just retired from a career in law enforcement last month. I am both shocked and disheartened to see how many individuals and even departments negatively represent themselves in my beloved profession.

The question then becomes, what exactly is "police" and their function?

In 1829, Sir Robert Peel created the London Metropolitan Police, the first ever official police organization. In it's creation, he cited 9 principles of policing. These principles were to guide them as an organization. When looking comparatively to various negative police actions with the guiding principles of their profession, it is not difficult to see where the actions have deviated from these guiding principles. These principles are taught in the academy, but more along the lines of a historical footnote respecting how police were created. They should be taught and given much more priority, as the heartbeat of what their "job function" is. I would personally like to see an activism focus urging police as an organization to place a much greater emphasis on returning to and embracing their guiding principles (especially principle 7).

These principles are:

PRINCIPLE 1 “The basic mission for which the police exist is to prevent crime and disorder.”
PRINCIPLE 2 “The ability of the police to perform their duties is dependent upon public approval of police actions.”
PRINCIPLE 3 “Police must secure the willing cooperation of the public in voluntary observance of the law to be able to secure and maintain the respect of the public.”
PRINCIPLE 4 “The degree of cooperation of the public that can be secured diminishes proportionately to the necessity of the use of physical force.”
PRINCIPLE 5 “Police seek and preserve public favor not by catering to the public opinion but by constantly demonstrating absolute impartial service to the law.”
PRINCIPLE 6 “Police use physical force to the extent necessary to secure observance of the law or to restore order only when the exercise of persuasion, advice and warning is found to be insufficient.”
PRINCIPLE 7 “Police, at all times, should maintain a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and the public are the police; the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full-time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence.”
PRINCIPLE 8 “Police should always direct their action strictly towards their functions and never appear to usurp the powers of the judiciary.”
PRINCIPLE 9 “The test of police efficiency is the absence of crime and disorder, not the visible evidence of police action in dealing with it.”

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