HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Justice & Public Safety » Gun Control & RKBA (Group) » Ghost Gunner 2 moves AR p...

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 03:30 PM

 

Ghost Gunner 2 moves AR production to the living room



3D pioneers Defense Distributed has taken gun manufacturing to the next level with the Ghost Gunner 2, a do-it-yourself CNC mill programmed to complete unfinished AR lower receivers. The company introduced the machine last week after spending two years upgrading the technology.

While building a gun at home may appeal to the self-reliant, the Ghost Gunner 2 is also another way for patrons to thumb their nose at government regulators. Referencing language used by a California lawmaker, the machine was designed so laymen could complete “ghost guns,” or unserialized AR rifles, in just a few mouse clicks. The $1,500 set-up includes the mill, mounting jigs, software, instructions and pre-loaded design files.

Although federal law permits unlicensed manufacturing of firearms, unfinished AR lower receivers toe the line. Businesses that sell unfinished lowers, or 80 percent receivers, can do so as long as they’re not pre-drilled, cast or dimpled. However, actually finishing one can be a sensitive issue.

The ATF issued Rul. 2015-1 early last year that said home gunsmiths must use their own tools to manufacture their own firearms. Because of the revision, “you kind of have to own your own equipment,” said Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, in a phone interview with Guns.com. He added that the Ghost Gunner 2 brings the building process down to an individual, consumer level.

Complete story at link

14 replies, 2540 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 14 replies Author Time Post
Reply Ghost Gunner 2 moves AR production to the living room (Original post)
Just reading posts Jun 2016 OP
gejohnston Jun 2016 #1
virginia mountainman Jun 2016 #2
Puha Ekapi Jun 2016 #3
Name removed Jun 2016 #4
Puha Ekapi Jun 2016 #5
JonathanRackham Jun 2016 #6
Puha Ekapi Jun 2016 #7
bolus Jun 2016 #8
Puha Ekapi Jul 2016 #9
bolus Jul 2016 #10
Puha Ekapi Jul 2016 #11
DonP Jul 2016 #12
Eleanors38 Jul 2016 #13
DonP Jul 2016 #14

Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 04:48 PM

1. just like the web and blog brought back

self publishing and pamphleteers, technology will bring back the local gunsmith. Of course, you can get a couple of these and a manufactures license and create a niche market.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 04:53 PM

2. $1,500...

And a few other minor things, like raw material, and you can make all the AR-15's you want...In metal....

And gun control advocates arguments become even more moot.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 04:59 PM

3. there have been..

...some issues with the quality of the final machining with this unit, and it can be done with absolutely PERFECT results for a lot less invested in tools. I've completed four lowers....3 AR-15's and an AR-10...using an 80% jig, a drill press and a router and they are absolutely flawless. No paperwork, no serial number, no registration, no trail along with a big middle finger and a FU to the grabbers. What's not to like?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Puha Ekapi (Reply #3)


Response to Name removed (Reply #4)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 09:54 AM

5. Look up...

.."80% Arms". I use their Easy Jig (you can find better deals on lowers elsewhere) and there are a ton of videos online.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 10:07 AM

6. The local college campus has 60 Maker-Bot 3D printers

The students have access for projects 24/7. Card swipe access w/no supervision.

Damn those engineering students.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 03:12 PM

7. I know of a fellow...

...who made a very fine AR-15 receiver from a "0% billet" using a Bridgeport mill in his garage. Are they gonna ban these?

?v=1400294673

I also know of another who made a very nice AK pattern rifle receiver from....wait for it....a shovel.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Thu Jun 30, 2016, 03:24 PM

8. only if they knew..

I've made 3 AR15 receivers, 3 1911 pistol receivers, 1 Sig Sauer p228 receiver, a glock 17 compatible receiver and a 50 BMG single shot rifle receiver all from "untraceable ghost gun" 80% receivers. If only the media knew of what you can make at home with hand tools, a router form home depot and a drill at home

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bolus (Reply #8)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 11:21 AM

9. I'd like...

...to try a 1911. How much more involved is that as compared to an 80% AR receiver?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Puha Ekapi (Reply #9)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 01:26 PM

10. Depends on the parts

I've done 3 with no experience and just watched youtube videos on how to do them. If you do a drop in parts kit then all that is needed is cutting the rails on the receiver and drilling 3 pin holes and then putting the parts together.

If you decide on a match parts kit or buying match parts individually, then every part needs to be hand fit together. Still doable but you will need a lot more specialty tools to finish and it takes a great deal longer. But you get to fit the parts together perfectly and it is much more satisfying to complete one.

Stealth Arms makes a good jig for finishing a receiver by hand (plus a drill). Matrix Precision also makes very good 1911 jigs for finishing a receiver by hand. I have both. The matrix ones are more expensive but make it a lot easier to finish one by hand. There are jigs for using machine shop tools as well but I dont have a milling machine.

search for "mosinvirus" on youtube. He has videos where he makes several 1911's and gives very good step by step instructions

Here is the first one I did.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bolus (Reply #10)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 01:31 PM

11. +1

Thanks for the info. Nice looking pistol too

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Just reading posts (Original post)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 01:42 PM

12. Banned in California yet?

 

With technology evolving as fast as it is, the legislature and Gov. Brown may need to get Leland Yee a pardon, so he can help them draft more control legislation to keep everyone "safe".

While they're at it better ban aluminum assault billets too.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DonP (Reply #12)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 02:21 PM

13. Banning technologies. California. The two don't seem to match.

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Eleanors38 (Reply #13)

Fri Jul 1, 2016, 03:57 PM

14. Kinda like banning sliced bread

 

Never dawns on the California brain trust that the Genie just ain't going back in that bottle, no matter how many laws they pass.

Just like Cook County, passed a law with a $25 surcharge on every firearms sold in the County and their budget counted on $2 million in revenue from that, from the 5 gun stores still within County limits.

Guess what? The real "take" was way less than $200,00 for almost 2 years and they are scratching their pointy little heads about the "shortfall". It's the same thing with hiking the taxes on gasoline.

People, including me, voted with our feet and wallets.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread