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Fri Jul 8, 2016, 05:40 PM

Police shooting of gun permit holder concerns others who legally carry

Police shooting of gun permit holder concerns others who legally carry

The death of 32-year-old Philando Castile appears to mark the first time a Minnesota permit-to-carry holder has been shot by police at least since the current permit law took effect in 2003.

And it raises concerns for some permit holders about their interactions with law enforcement.

Unless an officer asks, it is up to the individual whether they tell an officer they are carrying a gun, said Joseph Olson, who was the leading proponent of Minnesotaís permit-to-carry legislation that took effect in 2003. Olson has taught many permit-to-carry courses.


He said the advice he gives students on dealing with police is: Turn off the radio, roll down the window, turn on the interior lights if itís nighttime, put your hands on the top of the steering wheel and follow the officerís instructions.

http://www.twincities.com/2016/07/07/questions-raised-previously-about-st-anthony-police-encounters-with-permit-to-carry-holders/

I usually advise students to place their permit with their license and hand that over to the officer along with anything else requested. Then put your hand back on the wheel. Invariably the next question will be are you carrying and I recommend answering with a clear yes I am or no I am not. I believe that is less threatening even than saying "I have a permit and I am carrying a gun."

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Reply Police shooting of gun permit holder concerns others who legally carry (Original post)
sarisataka Jul 2016 OP
jonno99 Jul 2016 #1
shadowrider Jul 2016 #5
jonno99 Jul 2016 #6
pablo_marmol Jul 2016 #7
here2help Jul 2016 #2
aikoaiko Jul 2016 #3
Mugu Jul 2016 #4

Response to sarisataka (Original post)

Fri Jul 8, 2016, 05:59 PM

1. Excellent advice:

He said the advice he gives students on dealing with police is: Turn off the radio, roll down the window, turn on the interior lights if itís nighttime, put your hands on the top of the steering wheel and follow the officerís instructions.

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Response to jonno99 (Reply #1)

Sat Jul 9, 2016, 02:56 PM

5. It's all about being polite

following instructions and not copping an attitude.

Do that, and your chances of being shot by cop are next to zero.

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Response to shadowrider (Reply #5)

Sat Jul 9, 2016, 03:53 PM

6. That is the trick isn't it?

- being polite even if it seems there was no reason to be pulled over.

I agree with you, but then, I don't have trust issues (and perhaps more important - "authority issues" with the police.



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Response to jonno99 (Reply #1)

Sun Jul 10, 2016, 02:49 AM

7. I actually go a little further than this.


I position my right arm.....with my paperwork in hand......high, by the passenger headrest so it's in clearer view of the officer. For the same reason, I drape my left arm out of the window with my palm facing rearward. Interior lights on, and I've no window tinting. (Though that may change at some point.)

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Response to sarisataka (Original post)

Fri Jul 8, 2016, 06:06 PM

2. Seems like good advice, no?

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Response to sarisataka (Original post)

Fri Jul 8, 2016, 07:36 PM

3. A story that I thought was funny is now not so funny given the shooting of Castille in MN



Came upon a DUI checkpoint while driving my older model Bonneville with the split bench from seat. I mention the slit bench seat because I woukd wedge my .357 into the split because it was reasonably secure and easy to access with my right hand.

Rolled up the the first cop who asked me if I had anything in the car they should know about. I told him no drugs or alcohol but I did have a .357 sitting next to me.

He paused and said, "Ok, but don't make any sudden movements for your gun."

I said, "Same to you," and we stared at each other for bit before he waved me through.

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Response to sarisataka (Original post)

Sat Jul 9, 2016, 02:07 PM

4. Last winter I was stopped for having an obscured license plate (it was covered with snow.)

As Iíve gotten older, Iíve gotten much more far-sighted and without reading glasses have difficulty seeing things that are close to me. My reading glasses were in my inside coat pocket, but that was also where my government model 1911 resided in a shoulder holster. So, I decided to try to find my driverís license without my glasses. Well, with the combination of being far-sighted, it being dark, and the flashing/glaring lights of the police cruiser, I was having considerable difficulty finding my license. Seeing the difficulty, the officer shined his flashlight on my billfold while I shuffled through the cards and announced what card was on top. ďNope, thatís your FOID card. Nope, thatís your carry permit. Yep! Thereís your drivers license.Ē

After seeing my license, he told me that I wasnít the person that he was looking for, said that I was free to leave, and wished me a good evening.

The officer was polite and completely professional. He never asked if I was armed, and I never said.

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