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Thu Apr 16, 2020, 08:26 AM

Here's a bunch of photos from World War II that prove regulation haircuts don't win wars

Bringing up military grooming standards and haircut regulations is, without a doubt, the easiest way to find out who among your group of friends got out after one enlistment, and who stayed in for life.

One group will proclaim that the shortness of one's hair and the tightness of one's fade are inversely proportionate to how much discipline a service member has. The other group will shrug, stick their hands in their pockets, and walk away because they have more important shit to worry about.

This debate is basically the military's version of the chicken or the egg conundrum: Do haircut regulations make service members disciplined, or do service members choose to get screaming high and tights because they're disciplined and follow orders, no matter how asinine?

It's worth considering, since the fight over military haircuts is now making national headlines.

Days after Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton in California announced that barbershops there would remain open in the midst of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, Task & Purpose Pentagon Correspondent Jeff Schogol decided to put the age-old question to Defense Secretary Mark Esper and Army Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

https://taskandpurpose.com/mandatory-fun/haircuts-dont-win-wars

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Reply Here's a bunch of photos from World War II that prove regulation haircuts don't win wars (Original post)
douglas9 Apr 2020 OP
rampartc Apr 2020 #1
Squinch Apr 2020 #2
Chainfire Apr 2020 #3
denbot Apr 2020 #4

Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Apr 16, 2020, 08:32 AM

1. t don't think i got out in 1974 because of the haircts, but

it was symbolic of the constant bullshit on little things by the top sgt.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Apr 16, 2020, 08:36 AM

2. My phone didn't bring up the photos in the article but it DID bring up a video

of a service person making a mask from a Tshirt sleeve and then giving a thumbs up.

We KNOW that a Tshirt sleeve is inadequate protection. No wonder the virus is going like wildfire among the armed forces.

This is shameful. There is no reason, other than the idiocy of Donnie Bodybags, that first responders AND the military AND everyone else can't have masks that actually protect us.

We're 12 weeks into this. 3 months! Where are the masks, where are the tests?????

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Thu Apr 16, 2020, 10:09 AM

3. During WWII, anywhere within a couple of miles of the front

Soldiers would sometimes go for a month or more without a shower or a change of clothes. When you are getting shot at on a regular basis, you don't drive back to the barber shop to get a trim. Front line soldiers were not hassled about hair styles or uniform regulations; It would have been impossible to maintain those standards and that was the kind of chickenshit that destroys morale and would endanger officers. If you are familiar with the "Willie and Joe" cartoons of the era, the guys were depicted as being dirty, unshaven, and with wild hair. (not far from the mark)

One issue that rarely appears in WWII histories, is that during WWII, most front line soldiers in all armies, of all nations, had to deal with body lice infestations. Given a choice a lot of these folks would have preferred to have no body hair for the little white knights to hide in. The first step for front line soldiers being moved to rest and replenishment areas was a delousing, a shower, and recycled clean uniforms. (part of the delousing process was the soldier being dusted with copious amounts of DDT)

The photos of Basilone and Murphy were taken far from the shooting. That photo of Murphy was probably taken after the war.

When I was in Navy boot camp, the first steps of becoming a sailor was to have all of your civilian clothes taken away and sent home, getting all of you hair cut off and getting a uniform. Boot camp consists of first, destroying any vestiges of individuality, they strip you of everything, keep you off balance mentally and keep you stressed. After some weeks of harassment, to make sure that you are sufficiently "broken" they begin to rebuild you into Sailors, Soldiers, Airmen or Marines. It is a very effective technique and succeeds for a very high percentage of people. After basic training they allow you more freedom and more individuality within certain limits.

In boot camp, some of us caught on pretty quickly to what was happening. (others never got it) Those who understood had a lot easier time of the basic training. We were able to smile (on the inside) and watch the process with some detachment and even amusement.

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Response to douglas9 (Original post)

Sat Apr 25, 2020, 08:08 PM

4. Bookmarking website

Thanks.

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