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Sun May 26, 2019, 11:51 AM

What Fiction are you reading this week, May 26, 2019?



The Falls, an Inspector Rebus novel by Ian Rankin. From the shadowy world of an Internet stalker to the quicksand of lies in a missing girl's dissolute family, Rebus is led into the soul of evil. And to a shattering crime that only he, a man who treads the fine line between investigative brilliance and personal oblivion, could ever hope to understand. Iím loving this one. It is a bit slow to read, though, as it is full of Scottish terms and slang.

The Death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware, an audiobook. Quite suspenseful.

What memorable books are you reading this week?

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Reply What Fiction are you reading this week, May 26, 2019? (Original post)
hermetic May 2019 OP
dameatball May 2019 #1
hermetic May 2019 #2
Backseat Driver May 2019 #3
hermetic May 2019 #4
SeattleVet May 2019 #5
hermetic May 2019 #6
TexasProgresive May 2019 #7
hermetic May 2019 #8
TexasProgresive May 2019 #9
hermetic May 2019 #10
TexasProgresive May 2019 #11
Number9Dream May 2019 #12
hermetic May 2019 #13
mainstreetonce Jun 2019 #14
hermetic Jun 2019 #15

Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 11:54 AM

1. "The Lost Army of Cambyses" by Paul Sussman. Just started last night.

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Response to dameatball (Reply #1)

Sun May 26, 2019, 12:03 PM

2. That does sound memorable.

A labyrinth of intrigue, violence, and betrayal around a mysterious hieroglyphic fragment and rumors of a mythic lost tomb, what begins as a search for the truth becomes a race for survival.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 12:22 PM

3. Margaret Atwood's

Oryx and Crake, the Maddaddam series, I've just started this, but the quality is so evident after reading a pool-side quick and dirty, rather tiresome novel, Robin Cook's Pandemic.

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Response to Backseat Driver (Reply #3)

Sun May 26, 2019, 12:36 PM

4. I love Atwood

One of my top 5 authors. The Maddaddam series was a delight.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 01:39 PM

5. "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal" by Christopher Moore

Pretty well fills in the 'missing years'.

Contains a few characters that also appeared in other Moore novels.

It was recommended to me by a friend (I had been reading other Moore books) with the caveat, "...as long as you don't mind some blasphemy." (Mind it? I revel in it!!!)

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Response to SeattleVet (Reply #5)

Sun May 26, 2019, 02:58 PM

6. Isn't it great?

Comedy gold!

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sun May 26, 2019, 04:44 PM

7. I may never finish reading "The Shadow Rising" by Robert Jordan.

Ever since we have been able to stream TV I have been watching "Bosch," "Monk," and others, and thanks to racoon I started last night on the Ruth Rendell mysteries. I am also watching some cycling. I can't remember when I've watched so much TV.

I finished listening to the "Broken Earth" trilogy by N. K. Jemisin read by Robin Miles. It was excellent. Some probably won't care for it as Ms Jemisin likes to lay stuff out that you won't understand until later. As I am a fan of mysteries that works for me. Ms Miles does a great job performing the novels. I say performing because it is much more than reading.
This is the DU member formerly known as TexasProgresive.

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Response to TexasProgresive (Reply #7)

Sun May 26, 2019, 05:02 PM

8. Fun stuff, eh?

I could see myself doing the same. I read some Ruth Rendell a long time ago and the pathetic library here doesn't have anything of hers. But I will def look for her mysteries on DVDs.

Speaking of pathetic: I just checked and my opportunity to listen to Jemisin's first book is STILL 2 weeks away. Oh well, I'm having fun otherwise so I guess time will just fly by.

Good to see you.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #8)

Sun May 26, 2019, 05:14 PM

9. I thought I should check in.

Its been a while
This is the DU member formerly known as TexasProgresive.

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Response to TexasProgresive (Reply #9)

Sun May 26, 2019, 05:39 PM

10. Yeah,

I worry when I don't hear from my friends here when I know they live in areas with wild weather.

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Response to hermetic (Reply #10)

Sun May 26, 2019, 07:56 PM

11. We've been lucky over the years

The violent weather seems to be north or west or east or south. It was scary when the tornado hit Franklin, TX. That's 20 miles north. During that event there was a suspected rotation that was tracking to 1/2 mile north of the house. I think it dissipated. What's happening in North Texas, Oklahoma and Arkansas is terrible. Houston going underwater has become a regular thing since the 1970s. Very poor urban planing on a very flat coastal plain, too many roofs and too much pavement.
This is the DU member formerly known as TexasProgresive.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Tue May 28, 2019, 07:09 AM

12. I re-read "Dandelion Wine" by Ray Bradbury

First, I hate winter and love summer, so any books or movies that help transport me to warm, sunny days are good. "Dandelion Wine" transports me back to boyhood and summer, even though mine was in the '60's rather than 1928. The feelings and emotions in it are timeless. These words appear very early in the book, "Summer had gathered in the weather, the wind had the proper touch, the breathing of the world was long and warm and slow. You had only to rise, lean from your window, and know that this indeed was the first real time of freedom and living, this was the first morning of summer."

The chapters are episodic, but flow with the passing of the season. Typical Ray Bradbury, many of the episodes have qualities of fantasy and magic. "Dandelion Wine" reminds me that Mr. Bradbury could describe the ordinary as amazing and meaningful. A completely wonderful book which I'm sure I'll re-read again in a couple years.

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Response to Number9Dream (Reply #12)

Tue May 28, 2019, 08:18 AM

13. Nice write up!

I should reread that one myself. Though it would probably make me cry.

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Response to hermetic (Original post)

Sat Jun 1, 2019, 03:44 PM

14. And the Mountains Echoed


Khalid Hosseini

I'm just beginning,but the story really grabbed me.
This is my third read by this author. I think it is probably the best.

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Response to mainstreetonce (Reply #14)

Sun Jun 2, 2019, 11:24 AM

15. I read THE KITE RUNNER

and found the events in it to be quite disturbing. This one sounds like it would be more enjoyable.

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