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Mon Sep 14, 2020, 09:29 AM

So my best friends husband died 20 years ago and he left behind a big box of comic books.

From when he was a kid. Many are wrapped in those plastic bags and in very good shape.
Probably 30 or more of them. Some very early Batman and Superman stuff. Loads of them.

How would she go about determining the value of them?
There is an auction house in Dallas that can send somebody out to her place to peruse the
But she is worried about them being undervalued. No hurry to sell anyway.

Any ideas or clues about how to proceed would be appreciated.
We live in the DFW area, if that helps.

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Reply So my best friends husband died 20 years ago and he left behind a big box of comic books. (Original post)
flying_wahini Sep 14 OP
LiberalArkie Sep 14 #1
SheltieLover Sep 14 #2
Nay Sep 14 #3
N_E_1 for Tennis Sep 14 #4
ItsjustMe Sep 14 #5
Cuthbert Allgood Sep 14 #7
KY_EnviroGuy Sep 14 #6
Cuthbert Allgood Sep 14 #8
KY_EnviroGuy Sep 14 #9
Cuthbert Allgood Sep 14 #10

Response to flying_wahini (Original post)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 09:37 AM

1. There should be several comic book dealers in the areas.

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Response to flying_wahini (Original post)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 09:38 AM

2. Could be worth a fortune!

Google them to see what they are selling for.

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Response to flying_wahini (Original post)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 09:39 AM

3. Look on E-bay? Since she has only 30 comics, it wouldn't be too hard to look them all

up there and get a sense of what they are selling for. Also, I'm sure that there are comics collectors sites that would also have valuations she could use.

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Response to flying_wahini (Original post)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 09:40 AM

4. My first thought...

Search online for each specific book, date publication number so forth. Expect to get approximately half the value of them that you see online...if you want to sell. Many collectors are “flippers” buy then sell at slightly higher prices. This is how it worked in the baseball card world years ago.
Or head over to eBay and search for the specific book you’ll find prices there also...then not too bad of a place to sell.

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Response to ItsjustMe (Reply #5)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 12:10 PM

7. I would add comicbookrealm.com to the mix and/or mycomicshop.com

comicbookrealm is where I keep track of my collection and their prices seem pretty accurate.

mycomicshop is pretty reasonably priced and you can see what they are selling books for though if they don't have one, they don't have the price up.

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Response to flying_wahini (Original post)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 10:03 AM

6. The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide is the premier source....

The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide

See: https://www.gemstonepub.com/en/

About them.....
Best known as the home of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide, Gemstone Publishing, a division of Geppi's Entertainment Publishing & Auctions, was formed by Diamond Comic Distributors President and Chief Executive Officer Stephen A. Geppi as a conduit for his efforts in preserving and promoting the history of the comics medium.

Gemstone's product line also includes recurring publications such as The Big Big Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide, Overstreet's Comic Book Marketplace Yearbook, The Official Price Guide to Pop Culture: 150 Years of Character Toys & Collectibles, and a variety of special editions such as The Overstreet Guide to Grading Comics, The Overstreet Guide to Collecting Comics, and The Overstreet Guide to Collecting Comic and Animation Art.

Past publications include such titles as The Overstreet Comic Book Grading Guide, Hake's Price Guide To Character Toys, The Official Price Guide to Disney Collectibles, The Official Price Guide to Mechanical Banks and The Overstreet Indian Arrowheads Identification and Price Guide, as well as periodicals including Comic Book Marketplace, The Overstreet Comics Price Review, Overstreet's Fan, The Overstreet Comic Book Monthly, and Overstreet's Gold and Silver Age Quarterly. Back issues of many of these titles are available for sale on the Gemstone website. Gemstone also published Disney comic books under license from 2003 through 2008.

Along with our sister company Diamond International Galleries, Gemstone also co-publishes Scoop, a free weekly e-newsletter which looks inside the world of pop culture with a focus on auctions, toys, comics, posters, art and anything and everything pop culture! The spotlight is on fun, while also offering informative insights into the beloved playthings of the past and how they have influenced our culture.


also sold on Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Overstreet-Comic-Book-Price-Guide/dp/1603602526

My son, the sports and memorabilia nut, says if these are quite old and in good condition, it's definitely worth having them valuated. Some comics from the 30s and 40s have sold for millions.

This is an on-line pricing site you may want to investigate: https://comicspriceguide.com/

About them:
Now located in downtown Indianapolis, ComicsPriceGuide.com is comprised of a team of passionate comic book enthusiasts, who are just as passionate about technology. Started in 1995 as a tribute to the memory of Tim Beck, a close childhood friend of founder Bryan Neely, who unfortunately passed away from complications due to leukemia at the age of 25.

From the early days of their friendship, they were both focused on the world of comic reading and collecting. Their entire world revolved around this hobby. It didn't stop even while Bryan was going to college. At Ball State university, Bryan created the very first percursor of ComicsPriceGuide.com. Initially it was named MarvelWorld and featured only data and related information exclusively on Marvel Comics.
Fast-forward 18 years and ComicsPriceGuide.com has become the world's largest and most accurate online community for obtaining comic book value information. In addition to serving over 700,000 users value data, our message boards and blogs have become the go-to-source and authority for connecting comic book enthusiasts.

Our values remain simple, but our technology is not. Using a proprietary value algorithm, paired with dedicated comic enthusiasts, we are able to preserve real sales data to get up-to-the minute comic book value information.


My son also mentioned most all cities have one or more comic book/gaming/sports card shops (Louisville has several) and you may want to call around to those places to see if they offer professional help with valuations.

Best of luck!.......

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Reply #6)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 12:11 PM

8. Not a huge fan of Overstreet but probably on point for this instance

Overstreet isn't as timely on what is hot, but that doesn't seem to be the case here.

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Response to Cuthbert Allgood (Reply #8)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 12:34 PM

9. Thanks, I'm sure the OP will appreciate your expertise.

I'm not in that game at all but just relayed what my son said was the "thing" some years ago. With the internet into every game these days, everything changes too often.

Like any collectible, I would assume the biggest challenge is to not get ripped off by some scam artist on-line or in a store.

KY

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Response to KY_EnviroGuy (Reply #9)

Mon Sep 14, 2020, 12:46 PM

10. Overstreet is still a big part of the game, but some things change so fast.

Sounds like the comics in the OP won't be changing.

Yeah, online is nice because you can be up-to-date, but there are a lot of idiots out there who scam people.

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