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Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:17 PM

Osprey landing! Meeting up with his mate.



((Osprey pairs are generally monogamous and often mate for life. The male selects a nesting site in a dead tree, on a cliff, or on a man-made structure in or near the water. The pair collects sticks and other nesting materials together, but the female generally arranges the nest, which is large and bulky.

In the event that one mate dies, the other osprey will typically advertise for a new one. Male and female ospreys work together to raise chicks and cannot do it on their own.))

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Reply Osprey landing! Meeting up with his mate. (Original post)
elleng Apr 2021 OP
CaliforniaPeggy Apr 2021 #1
AllaN01Bear Apr 2021 #2
elleng Apr 2021 #3
Quakerfriend Apr 2021 #4
Bayard Apr 2021 #5
FirstLight Apr 2021 #6
elleng Apr 2021 #7
FirstLight Apr 2021 #8
elleng Apr 2021 #9
FirstLight Apr 2021 #10
Blue Dawn Apr 2021 #11
elleng Apr 2021 #12
elleng Apr 2021 #13

Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:19 PM

1. Good shot!

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:27 PM

2. eggscllent.

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Response to AllaN01Bear (Reply #2)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:30 PM

3. More like LUCKY!

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:36 PM

4. Wow, great pic!

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 03:46 PM

5. Wonderful!

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 04:12 PM

6. so beautiful....and BIG

I worked for a campground at Emerald Bay/Eagle Point one summer, we had a osprey nest on the cliffs of the point in a tree where the trail went down the steep incline....They saw me one day on the trail and made quite a ruckus! I got outta there before they decided to dive bomb me!

Their wingspan has gotta be at least 3 feet!

(edit after googling: the avg wingspan is FIVE FEET! ohh fuck! I guess it looks different when they are at the top pf a tree! lmao)

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Response to FirstLight (Reply #6)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 04:21 PM

7. Would feel VERY big, and threatening!

Here he is, on tree next to my patio, over my head.

We DO have a relationship, have gotten used to eachother for the 6 years I've been here, I wave and 'whistle,' but I doubt their calls are for me!

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Response to elleng (Reply #7)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 04:28 PM

8. omg wow!

That's awesome!

So far I have only made "friends" with the Stellar's Jays & squirrels... But in the summertime at night, I will go out on the deck and have "hooties" conversations with the Great Horned Owls, they actually DO answer!

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Response to FirstLight (Reply #8)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 04:32 PM

9. Have heard that about owls, but haven't seen any here;

MAY have heard one a few years ago. County placed a box for them near my house years ago, but none have appeared.

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Response to elleng (Reply #9)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 04:34 PM

10. GH Owls are huge too!

...and yet they are so silent they could fly right over me and I wouldnt see or hear them!

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Response to elleng (Original post)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 06:10 PM

11. Elleng, thank you!

I love the photos. I really didn’t know that the male actually finds the nesting site.

You bring a lot of joy to my life with your posts and your photos!

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Response to Blue Dawn (Reply #11)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 06:58 PM

12. You're welcome, Blue Dawn, and THANKS.

Put this together today, worth the time, for me at least:
Osprey Tales ← Osprey NestExtra! Extra! →

The Cloacal Kiss
Posted on April 7, 2014 by Harriett Raptor “To understand osprey reproduction, one must know a bit about osprey anatomy”, said Harriett. “The Doctor will explain”.
The cloaca
The cloaca is the posterior opening that serves as the only opening for the intestinal, reproductive, and urinary tracts of birds. The cloaca of males and females are the same. This confuses some humans. But, it’s not too hard to understand, if you take it step by step. . .
I do not think Harriett would mind showing us hers. Hang on a second. Let me ask.
OK, here it is: 🙂 (See pic)
Copulation
Copulation is the method in which a male bird fertilizes the ovum of a female bird.
The male and female press their cloaca’s together for a few moments to transfer sperm to the female. Each copulation last about 15 seconds; it is fast and furious. . .
Females in older pairs are fed more than females in younger pairs. It points to an inexperienced male.
Once they are settled at a site and start courtship feeding, mating can occur at almost any time.
An Osprey’s mating call consists of a brief “hew” and is repeated many times.
Most copulations take place at the nest because females spend most of their time there, but they can occur anywhere. No elaborate ritual or display precedes mating.
In general osprey copulations begin about 14 days before, and peak in the few days before the start of egg laying. They occur frequently, but only 39% of copulations result in cloacal kiss. It may take 160 copulation attempts to sucessfully fertilze a female to form a clutch of eggs.
Copulation occurs most often in the early morning. Female ospreys spent almost of their time (more than 95%) at the nest as they are fed there by the male. There is no association between courtship feeding and copulation, and hence no evidence that females trade copulations for food. Males maximized the time they spent at the nest with the female just prior to and during egg laying. . .
A male will land on a female’s back many times without this final contact being made. Studies have shown only 30-40% of attempts are successful. Early copulations stimulate the growth of eggs within the female’s ovary and strengthen the pair bond. The last 3 or 4 days before eggs are laid are the most critical for fertilization.
In a successful copulation the sperm travel to the female’s oviduct. This is where the various stages of egg development occur. First, the sperm fertilizes an egg which has been produced during ovulation and already has a yolk. Then the principal coating of albumin is applied before the outer and inner shell membranes are added. These stages take about 5 hours. Next the calcareous shell forms. The background pigments are laid down. The egg stays within the uterus for about 20 hours and tiny glands excrete the streaks and patterns that result in the darker markings on the shell. Finally the egg is laid. The eggs weigh between 60 and 80g and are about the size of duck eggs. The background color ranges from off white to pale brown, the mottling is red or dark brown. The first egg is usually the largest.' OK, we're all ready now, right?!
The Cloacal Kiss
OSPREYTALETELLER.COM

https://ospreytaleteller.com/2014/04/07/the-cloacal-kiss/?

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Response to Blue Dawn (Reply #11)

Wed Apr 7, 2021, 07:00 PM

13. and another:

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