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Wed Jul 26, 2017, 09:00 PM

Can healing come without listening to those we differ with?

My efficacy and usefulness as a pastor and caregiver (and as a decent member of humanity), is predicated on knowing how people’s hearts work, the way they think, how they respond to fear, what motivates and hurts them. Understanding human beings is my life’s work. It is the work of every one of us striving for empathy regardless of profession or placement.

There are times though, when people’s actions are so profoundly damaging to others, that asking why isn’t the most pressing question; moments when to belabor that question would be irresponsible to those at risk.


http://johnpavlovitz.com/2017/07/18/dont-care-still-support-president/

I get his point and it certainly resonates, and I agree that our first priority has to be those who are bullied. But how can we be "ambassadors of reconciliation" or turn our brothers and sisters from sin without also having conversations? After all the root word of conversation and conversion are the same.

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Reply Can healing come without listening to those we differ with? (Original post)
summer_in_TX Jul 2017 OP
guillaumeb Jul 2017 #1
summer_in_TX Jul 2017 #4
spicysista Jul 2017 #2
summer_in_TX Jul 2017 #3

Response to summer_in_TX (Original post)

Wed Jul 26, 2017, 09:06 PM

1. From the article:

In these moments, I’m not really interested in whatever toxic cocktail of bad theology, fear, life experience, nationalism, and personality that have created their responses—as I am helping people who are made vulnerable by their responses. I’d like to uncover and care for the heart of the bully, but in this hour I need to defend the bodies and souls of the bullied.


Very well written. Recommended.

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Response to guillaumeb (Reply #1)

Thu Jul 27, 2017, 12:39 AM

4. Thankful for a liberal Christian as articulate

as John Pavlovitz. He says it so much better than I could possibly do.

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Response to summer_in_TX (Original post)

Wed Jul 26, 2017, 10:02 PM

2. This....is a hard one.

I do struggle with finding a sort of balance. Often, I find myself wondering.....where to even start with the bully. You can find all kinds of examples in scriptural text that will justify any number of reactions. How is one to know what to do?
I personally seek the good and beauty in all of my fellow man. I actively, as a testament of my faith and rearing, try to look past the faults of others to instead recognize their hurt and pain. I am determined to stay on this path but it is getting harder by the ....tweet.
I see bullying on all forums and in every place under the sun. I'm just not sure that compassion and changing hearts and minds is the way to go. No, we must change policy.
If we had waited on the bullies of the south to see the error of their ways and change their hearts toward their black neighbors, we'd still have american apartheid as law.
Thanks for posting this. It's beautifully written.

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Response to spicysista (Reply #2)

Thu Jul 27, 2017, 12:35 AM

3. I do think changing policy is key

Various Civil Rights era provisions had a big impact on many Americans. Likewise the Supreme Court ruling on Marriage Equality has caused attitudes to change for a large percentage of society.

I'm struggling here too.

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